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Part 1 Chapter 6

Emma could not feel a doubt of having given Harriet's fancy a proper direction and raised the gratitude1 of her young vanity to a very good purpose, for she found her decidedly more sensible than before of Mr. Elton's being a remarkably2 handsome man, with most agreeable manners; and as she had no hesitation3 in following up the assurance of his admiration4 by agreeable hints, she was soon pretty confident of creating as much liking5 on Harriet's side, as there could be any occasion for. She was quite convinced of Mr. Elton's being in the fairest way of falling in love, if not in love already. She had no scruple6 with regard to him. He talked of Harriet, and praised her so warmly, that she could not suppose any thing wanting which a little time would not add. His perception of the striking improvement of Harriet's manner, since her introduction at Hartfield, was not one of the least agreeable proofs of his growing attachment7.

`You have given Miss Smith all that she required,' said he; `you have made her graceful8 and easy. She was a beautiful creature when she came to you, but, in my opinion, the attractions you have added are infinitely9 superior to what she received from nature.'

`I am glad you think I have been useful to her; but Harriet only wanted drawing out, and receiving a few, very few hints. She had all the natural grace of sweetness of temper and artlessness in herself. I have done very little.'

`If it were admissible to contradict a lady,' said the gallant10 Mr. Elton -

`I have perhaps given her a little more decision of character, have taught her to think on points which had not fallen in her way before.'

`Exactly so; that is what principally strikes me. So much superadded decision of character! Skilful11 has been the hand!'

`Great has been the pleasure, I am sure. I never met with a disposition12 more truly amiable13.'

`I have no doubt of it.' And it was spoken with a sort of sighing animation14, which had a vast deal of the lover. She was not less pleased another day with the manner in which he seconded a sudden wish of hers, to have Harriet's picture.

`Did you ever have your likeness15 taken, Harriet?' said she: `did you ever sit for your picture?'

Harriet was on the point of leaving the room, and only stopt to say, with a very interesting na?veté,

`Oh! dear, no, never.'

No sooner was she out of sight, than Emma exclaimed,

`What an exquisite16 possession a good picture of her would be! I would give any money for it. I almost long to attempt her likeness myself. You do not know it I dare say, but two or three years ago I had a great passion for taking likenesses, and attempted several of my friends, and was thought to have a tolerable eye in general. But from one cause or another, I gave it up in disgust. But really, I could almost venture, if Harriet would sit to me. It would be such a delight to have her picture!'

`Let me entreat17 you,' cried Mr. Elton; `it would indeed be a delight! Let me entreat you, Miss Woodhouse, to exercise so charming a talent in favour of your friend. I know what your drawings are. How could you suppose me ignorant? Is not this room rich in specimens18 of your landscapes and flowers; and has not Mrs. Weston some inimitable figure-pieces in her drawing-room, at Randalls?'

Yes, good man! - thought Emma - but what has all that to do with taking likenesses? You know nothing of drawing. Don't pretend to be in raptures19 about mine. Keep your raptures for Harriet's face. `Well, if you give me such kind encouragement, Mr. Elton, I believe I shall try what I can do. Harriet's features are very delicate, which makes a likeness difficult; and yet there is a peculiarity20 in the shape of the eye and the lines about the mouth which one ought to catch.'

`Exactly so - The shape of the eye and the lines about the mouth - I have not a doubt of your success. Pray, pray attempt it. As you will do it, it will indeed, to use your own words, be an exquisite possession.'

`But I am afraid, Mr. Elton, Harriet will not like to sit. She thinks so little of her own beauty. Did not you observe her manner of answering me? How completely it meant, ``why should my picture be drawn21?'''

`Oh! yes, I observed it, I assure you. It was not lost on me. But still I cannot imagine she would not be persuaded.'

Harriet was soon back again, and the proposal almost immediately made; and she had no scruples22 which could stand many minutes against the earnest pressing of both the others. Emma wished to go to work directly, and therefore produced the portfolio23 containing her various attempts at portraits, for not one of them had ever been finished, that they might decide together on the best size for Harriet. Her many beginnings were displayed. Miniatures, half-lengths, whole-lengths, pencil, crayon, and water-colours had been all tried in turn. She had always wanted to do every thing, and had made more progress both in drawing and music than many might have done with so little labour as she would ever submit to. She played and sang; - and drew in almost every style; but steadiness had always been wanting; and in nothing had she approached the degree of excellence24 which she would have been glad to command, and ought not to have failed of. She was not much deceived as to her own skill either as an artist or a musician, but she was not unwilling25 to have others deceived, or sorry to know her reputation for accomplishment26 often higher than it deserved.

There was merit in every drawing - in the least finished, perhaps the most; her style was spirited; but had there been much less, or had there been ten times more, the delight and admiration of her two companions would have been the same. They were both in ecstasies27. A likeness pleases every body; and Miss Woodhouse's performances must be capital.

`No great variety of faces for you,' said Emma. `I had only my own family to study from. There is my father - another of my father - but the idea of sitting for his picture made him so nervous, that I could only take him by stealth; neither of them very like therefore. Mrs. Weston again, and again, and again, you see. Dear Mrs. Weston! always my kindest friend on every occasion. She would sit whenever I asked her. There is my sister; and really quite her own little elegant figure! - and the face not unlike. I should have made a good likeness of her, if she would have sat longer, but she was in such a hurry to have me draw her four children that she would not be quiet. Then, here come all my attempts at three of those four children; - there they are, Henry and John and Bella, from one end of the sheet to the other, and any one of them might do for any one of the rest. She was so eager to have them drawn that I could not refuse; but there is no making children of three or four years old stand still you know; nor can it be very easy to take any likeness of them, beyond the air and complexion28, unless they are coarser featured than any of mama's children ever were. Here is my sketch29 of the fourth, who was a baby. I took him as he was sleeping on the sofa, and it is as strong a likeness of his cockade as you would wish to see. He had nestled down his head most conveniently. That's very like. I am rather proud of little George. The corner of the sofa is very good. Then here is my last,' - unclosing a pretty sketch of a gentleman in small size, whole-length - `my last and my best - my brother, Mr. John Knightley. - This did not want much of being finished, when I put it away in a pet, and vowed30 I would never take another likeness. I could not help being provoked; for after all my pains, and when I had really made a very good likeness of it - (Mrs. Weston and I were quite agreed in thinking it very like) - only too handsome - too flattering - but that was a fault on the right side - after all this, came poor dear Isabella's cold approbation31 of - `Yes, it was a little like - but to be sure it did not do him justice.' We had had a great deal of trouble in persuading him to sit at all. It was made a great favour of; and altogether it was more than I could bear; and so I never would finish it, to have it apologised over as an unfavourable likeness, to every morning visitor in Brunswick Square; - and, as I said, I did then forswear ever drawing any body again. But for Harriet's sake, or rather for my own, and as there are no husbands and wives in the case at present, I will break my resolution now.'

Mr. Elton seemed very properly struck and delighted by the idea, and was repeating, `No husbands and wives in the case at present indeed, as you observe. Exactly so. No husbands and wives,' with so interesting a consciousness, that Emma began to consider whether she had not better leave them together at once. But as she wanted to be drawing, the declaration must wait a little longer.

She had soon fixed32 on the size and sort of portrait. It was to be a whole-length in water-colours, like Mr. John Knightley's, and was destined33, if she could please herself, to hold a very honourable34 station over the mantelpiece.

The sitting began; and Harriet, smiling and blushing, and afraid of not keeping her attitude and countenance35, presented a very sweet mixture of youthful expression to the steady eyes of the artist. But there was no doing any thing, with Mr. Elton fidgeting behind her and watching every touch. She gave him credit for stationing himself where he might gaze and gaze again without offence; but was really obliged to put an end to it, and request him to place himself elsewhere. It then occurred to her to employ him in reading.

`If he would be so good as to read to them, it would be a kindness indeed! It would amuse away the difficulties of her part, and lessen36 the irksomeness of Miss Smith's.'

Mr. Elton was only too happy. Harriet listened, and Emma drew in peace. She must allow him to be still frequently coming to look; any thing less would certainly have been too little in a lover; and he was ready at the smallest intermission of the pencil, to jump up and see the progress, and be charmed. - There was no being displeased37 with such an encourager, for his admiration made him discern a likeness almost before it was possible. She could not respect his eye, but his love and his complaisance38 were unexceptionable.

The sitting was altogether very satisfactory; she was quite enough pleased with the first day's sketch to wish to go on. There was no want of likeness, she had been fortunate in the attitude, and as she meant to throw in a little improvement to the figure, to give a little more height, and considerably39 more elegance40, she had great confidence of its being in every way a pretty drawing at last, and of its filling its destined place with credit to them both - a standing41 memorial of the beauty of one, the skill of the other, and the friendship of both; with as many other agreeable associations as Mr. Elton's very promising42 attachment was likely to add.

Harriet was to sit again the next day; and Mr. Elton, just as he ought, entreated43 for the permission of attending and reading to them again.

`By all means. We shall be most happy to consider you as one of the party.'

The same civilities and courtesies, the same success and satisfaction, took place on the morrow, and accompanied the whole progress of the picture, which was rapid and happy. Every body who saw it was pleased, but Mr. Elton was in continual raptures, and defended it through every criticism.

`Miss Woodhouse has given her friend the only beauty she wanted,' - observed Mrs. Weston to him - not in the least suspecting that she was addressing a lover. - `The expression of the eye is most correct, but Miss Smith has not those eyebrows44 and eyelashes. It is the fault of her face that she has them not.'

`Do you think so?' replied he. `I cannot agree with you. It appears to me a most perfect resemblance in every feature. I never saw such a likeness in my life. We must allow for the effect of shade, you know.'

`You have made her too tall, Emma,' said Mr. Knightley.

Emma knew that she had, but would not own it; and Mr. Elton warmly added,

`Oh no! certainly not too tall; not in the least too tall. Consider, she is sitting down - which naturally presents a different - which in short gives exactly the idea - and the proportions must be preserved, you know. Proportions, fore-shortening. - Oh no! it gives one exactly the idea of such a height as Miss Smith's. Exactly so indeed!'

`It is very pretty,' said Mr. Woodhouse. `So prettily45 done! Just as your drawings always are, my dear. I do not know any body who draws so well as you do. The only thing I do not thoroughly46 like is, that she seems to be sitting out of doors, with only a little shawl over her shoulders - and it makes one think she must catch cold.'

`But, my dear papa, it is supposed to be summer; a warm day in summer. Look at the tree.'

`But it is never safe to sit out of doors, my dear.'

`You, sir, may say any thing,' cried Mr. Elton, `but I must confess that I regard it as a most happy thought, the placing of Miss Smith out of doors; and the tree is touched with such inimitable spirit! Any other situation would have been much less in character. The na?veté of Miss Smith's manners - and altogether - Oh, it is most admirable! I cannot keep my eyes from it. I never saw such a likeness.'

The next thing wanted was to get the picture framed; and here were a few difficulties. It must be done directly; it must be done in London; the order must go through the hands of some intelligent person whose taste could be depended on; and Isabella, the usual doer of all commissions, must not be applied47 to, because it was December, and Mr. Woodhouse could not bear the idea of her stirring out of her house in the fogs of December. But no sooner was the distress48 known to Mr. Elton, than it was removed. His gallantry was always on the alert. `Might he be trusted with the commission, what infinite pleasure should he have in executing it! he could ride to London at any time. It was impossible to say how much he should be gratified by being employed on such an errand.'

`He was too good! - she could not endure the thought! - she would not give him such a troublesome office for the world,' - brought on the desired repetition of entreaties49 and assurances, - and a very few minutes settled the business.

Mr. Elton was to take the drawing to London, chuse the frame, and give the directions; and Emma thought she could so pack it as to ensure its safety without much incommoding him, while he seemed mostly fearful of not being incommoded enough.

`What a precious deposit!' said he with a tender sigh, as he received it.

`This man is almost too gallant to be in love,' thought Emma. `I should say so, but that I suppose there may be a hundred different ways of being in love. He is an excellent young man, and will suit Harriet exactly; it will be an ``Exactly so,'' as he says himself; but he does sigh and languish50, and study for compliments rather more than I could endure as a principal. I come in for a pretty good share as a second. But it is his gratitude on Harriet's account.'

 

爱玛毫不怀疑她已把哈丽特的幻想引上了正确的方向,并把她新近出于虚荣心而产生的感激之情引导到有益的目标上,因为她发现,哈丽特比以前更明确地认识到:埃尔顿先生仪表堂堂,风度翩翩。她一方面采取循循善诱的办法,步步增进埃尔顿先生的倾慕之情,另一方面又满怀信心地抓住每个机会,培养哈丽特对他的好感。她相信,埃尔顿先生即便还没爱上哈丽特,那他也是正在坠人情网。她对他丝毫没有什么怀疑的。他喜欢谈论哈丽特,热烈地赞扬她,爱玛觉得,只要略给点时间,就能水到渠成。哈丽特来哈特菲尔德以后,举止有了明显的长进,埃尔顿先生把这一情况看在眼里,这是一个令人可喜的证明,说明他对哈丽特渐渐有了意思。

“你给了史密斯小姐所需要的一切,”埃尔顿先生说。“你把她培养得既优雅又大方。她刚到你这儿来的时候,也算得上是个美人,不过依我看来,你给她增添的妩媚多姿,要远远胜过她的天生丽质。”

“我很高兴,你觉得我帮了她的忙。不过哈丽特只需要别人诱导一下,稍微点拨一两句就行了。她天生性情温柔,天真朴实。我尽的力很少。”

“如果我可以跟一位小姐唱反调的话——”埃尔顿先生摆出一副献殷勤的样子说。

“我也许使她的性格变得果断了一点,教她思考一些以前不曾想过的问题。”

“一点不错,我感觉最明显的正是这一点。性格变得果断多啦!你还真行啊。”

“我觉得非常有意思。我以前从没遇见过这么可爱的人。”

“这我毫不怀疑。”埃尔顿先生说罢,兴奋地叹了口气,活像一个坠人情网的人。又有一天,爱玛突然生出一个念头,要给哈丽特画像,埃尔顿欣然表示支持的样子,也让爱玛同样为之高兴。

“哈丽特,你有没有让人给你画过像?”爱玛说道。“你以前让人给你画过吗?”

“啊呀!没有,从来没有。”

等她一走出房去,爱玛便大声说道: “她的像要是画得好,该是一件多么精美的珍藏品啊!出多少钱我都要。我简直想亲自给她画一幅。你或许还不知道,就在两三年前,我非常喜欢画像,曾给几个朋友画过,大家觉得还看得过去。然而,由于这样那样的原因,我后来就不高兴画了。不过说真的,如果哈丽特愿意让我画,我倒可以试一试。给她画像该是多么令人高兴啊!”

“我恳求你啦,”埃尔顿先生叫了起来。“那当然令人高兴啦!我恳求你啦,伍德豪斯小姐,你就为你的朋友施展一下你那卓越的才能吧。我知道你绘画很有功夫,你怎么能当我不了解呢?这间屋里不是有不少你的风景画和花卉画吗?在兰多尔斯,韦斯顿太太的客厅里不是也有几幅无与伦比的人物画吗?”

是呀,埃尔顿先生!爱玛心想,可这与画像有什么关系呢?你对绘画一窍不通。不要假装为我的画所陶醉。还是留着这份痴情去迷恋哈丽特的脸蛋吧。“好吧,埃尔顿先生,既然你好心鼓励我,那我不妨试试看。哈丽特长得眉清目秀,画起来比较困难。不过,她眼睛的形状和嘴巴的线条比较奇特,一定要描绘出来。”

“一点不错——眼睛的形状和嘴巴的线条——毫无疑问你会画好的。求你务必试一试。要是由你来画,一定会像你说的那样,成为一件精美的珍藏品。”

“不过,埃尔顿先生,我担心哈丽特不愿意让我画。她并不觉得自己有多美。你刚才有没有注意她是怎么回答我的?那意思是说:‘干吗要给我画像呢?”’

“哦!是的,我确实注意到了。我并没视若无睹。不过,我想她不至于说不通吧。”

不一会工夫,哈丽特又进来了,两人马上提出了给她画像的事。哈丽特虽然有些顾虑,但经不住两人的再三劝说,没过多久就同意了。爱玛想要马上动笔,因此便取出画夹,里面夹着她好多的习作,却没有一张画完的,他们准备一起挑选一下,看给哈丽特画多大的比较合适。她把一张张画摆开,都是刚开了个头,什么小画像、半身像、全身像、铅笔画、蜡笔画、水笔画,全都试过了。她总是什么都想试试,无论绘画还是音乐,都能少出力气多长进,让许多人望尘莫及。她又弹琴又唱歌,还画各种风格的图画,可就是缺乏恒心。她什么都想精通,按理说也该精通,可惜什么都没精通过。她对自己的绘画和弹唱技艺并没看得太高,不过要是别人把她的技艺看得很高,她也不会不愿意,知道自己的才艺往往被人高估,她也并不感到不安。

每一幅画都有优点——而越是没画几笔的画,或许优点越多。从风格上看,她的画很有生气。不过,即使优点少得多,或者比现在多十倍,她那两个伙伴也会同样喜欢,同样赞赏。他们俩都看得人了迷。画像本来是人人喜爱的,而伍德豪斯小姐又画得那么棒。

“我也没有多少人可画的,”爱玛说道。“初学的时候只能给自家的人画。这是我父亲的,这一幅也是他的。不过,他一听说别人给他画像就紧张,我只能偷偷地给他画,因此这两张都不大像。你瞧,又是书斯顿太太的,又是她的,又是她的。亲爱的韦斯顿太太!无论什么时候都是我最好的朋友。只要我说一声,她就会让我给她画像。这是我姐姐的,她的身材就是这么小巧玲珑!还有那张脸也挺像的。她要是多坐一会,我还要画得好些,可她急着要我给她的四个孩子画,就是坐不安稳。这些是我给她的三个孩子画的,你们瞧,从画纸的一边到另一边,依次是亨利、约翰和贝拉,其中任何一个都可以说成是另两人中的任何一个。我姐姐非要我给他们画,我都没法推托。不过你也知道,你没法让三四岁的孩子安安静静地站着,再说给他们画像,除了神态和肤色以外,要画好也不是很容易,除非他们比别人家的孩子长得五官粗俗一些。这是我给她第四个孩子画的素描,当时他还是个娃娃。我是趁他在沙发上睡着了给他画的,他帽子上的花结画得要多像有多像。他怡然自得地垂着头,这就很像他。我很为小乔治感到自豪。这个沙发角也画得很好。这是我最后的一幅,”说着摊开一位男士的一幅漂亮的全身素描,“我最后的一幅,也是最好的一幅——我姐夫约翰-奈特利先生的。这幅画只差一点点就画完了,可我当时心里不高兴,就把它搁到了一边,还发誓以后再也不给人画像了。我没法不生气,因为我费了那么大的劲儿,而且又画得那么像——(韦斯顿太太和我一致认为画得非常像)——只是画得太英俊——太潇洒了,不过这只是把他画得太好的缺陷,没想到可怜的伊莎贝拉冷言冷语地说什么:‘是的,有一点像——不过确实没有把他画好。’我们起初费了不少口舌才劝他坐下来,算是给了我好大的面子。我实在咽不下这口气,因而一直没有画完,省得布伦斯维克广场早上来了客人,还得向人家赔不是,说是画得不像样。我刚才说过,我当时就发誓再也不给任何入画像。不过,看在哈丽特的分上,也是为了我自己,再说这次也牵扯不到丈夫和妻子的问题,我愿意破一次例。”

埃尔顿先生听了这话,似乎大为感动,也很高兴,因而重复说道:“正如你说的,这次还真是一点不错,牵扯不到丈夫和妻子的问题。”十分有趣的是,他说这话的时候还有点不好意思,爱玛心想是否应该立即走开,让他们两人单独在一起。然而她一心想要画像,埃尔顿先生想表白钟情还要再等一会。

她很快决定了画像的大小和种类。跟约翰·奈特利先生的一样,画一张全身水彩像。如果画得满意,就挂在壁炉上方的显要位置。

开始画像了。哈丽特脸上笑吟吟、红彤彤的,唯恐把握不住姿态和表情,眼见那位艺术家目不转睛地盯着她,硬摆出一副又活泼又甜蜜的神态。怎奈埃尔顿先生焦灼不安地站在爱玛身后,注视着每一笔每一画,真让爱玛没法画下去。爱玛给了他面子,任他随意站在什么地方,只要不碍事就可以看个不停,可是这下还真得结束这种局面了,要求他挪个地方。这时她灵机一动,叫他念书给她们听。

“你要是肯念书给我们听,那该有多好啊!有了这样的消遣,我就不会觉得吃力,史密斯小姐也不会觉得腻烦。”

埃尔顿先生十分乐意。哈丽特听他念书,爱玛静静地作画。她得允许他不时地过来看一眼,否则就太没有情人味了。他随时留心,画笔稍一停顿,就跳起来看看画得怎么样了,为之倾倒一番。有这样一个人在旁边鼓气,倒也没有什么令人不快的,因为他心里情意绵绵,在几乎还看不出像不像的时候,就能发觉画得很逼真了。爱玛并不欣赏他的眼力,他的痴情和殷勤却是无可挑剔的。

画像进行得令人十分满意。爱玛对头一天的草图感到很称心,打算继续画下去。她画得很像,姿势取得恰到好处,她还有意在身材上加了点工,个子稍微拔高一点,风度却要优雅得多,因而她充满自信,觉得这幅画最后一定会取得圆满成功,挂在那显要的位置,为她们两人增添光彩——永远记录了一个人的美貌,另一个人的技艺,以及两个人的友情。加上埃尔顿先生一片钟情,好事在望,更能引起许多美好的联想。

第二天还要给哈丽特画像,埃尔顿先生理所当然提出请求,允许他再来给她们念书。

“当然可以。热烈欢迎你参加。”

第二天,又出现了同样的殷勤多礼,同样的称心满意,而且贯穿在整个绘画过程之中。画像完成得又快又好,谁见了谁喜欢,埃尔顿先生更是欣喜不止,别人每挑一点毛病,他都要加以辩驳。

“伍德豪斯小姐弥补了她的朋友唯一美中不足的地方,”韦斯顿太太对他说,却丝毫没有料到,她在跟一个坠人情网的人说话。“眼神画得像极了,不过史密斯小姐的眉毛和睫毛却不是这样的。她的眉毛和睫毛没长好,这是她面部的唯一缺陷。”

“你是这样认为的吗?”埃尔顿先生说。“我不同意你的看法。依我看来,这幅画像处处都画得惟妙惟肖。我长了这么大,从未见过这么好的画像。你要知道,我们必须考虑到阴影的效果。”

“你把她画得过高了,爱玛,”奈特利先生说。

爱玛知道确实如此,可她又不愿承认,这时埃尔顿先生情绪激昂地说道: “哦,没有的事!根本就不过高,一点也不过高。想想看,她是坐着的——这当然与站着不一样啦——总而言之,跟她真人丝毫不差——你知道,还要保持一定的比例。按比例缩短。哦,没有的事!画的就是史密斯小姐的身高,分毫不差。确实分毫不差!”

“画得很好,”伍德豪斯先生说。“画得好极啦!亲爱的,你画的画总是这么好看。我看谁也没有你画得好。只有一点我不是很欣赏:她似乎坐在户外,肩上只披了一条披巾——让人担心她要着凉。”

“亲爱的爸爸,画上画的是夏天呀,一个暖暖和和的夏日。你看那上面的树。”

“可是坐在户外总不保险呀,宝贝。”

“先生,你怎么说都可以,”埃尔顿先生大声嚷道。“不过说实话,我觉得把史密斯小姐放在户外真是妙极了。这棵树画得栩栩如生,简直无与伦比了!换个别的背景就不那么协调了。史密斯小姐神态那样天真——总的说来——哦,画得绝妙极了!我两眼都挪不开了。我从没见过这么好的画像。”

接着要办的是给画像配个镜框。这有几个难处:一是要立即配好,二是要到伦敦去配,三是要找一个聪明可靠的人去经办。往常有事总找伊莎贝拉,这一次可不能劳驾她了,因为眼下已是十二月,伍德豪斯先生不忍心让她冒着十二月的大雾出门。不过,埃尔顿先生一得知此事,难题便迎刃而解。他要向女人献殷勤,总是伺机以待。“要是把这事委托给我,我会感到多么荣幸啊!我可以随时骑马去伦敦。若是能让我去办这件事,我真说不出该有多高兴。”

“你真是太好了!真让我于心不忍!我说什么也不忍心让你去办这样一件麻烦事。”埃尔顿先生一听这话,又恳求了一番,并且叫她尽管放心——不一会工夫,事情就谈妥了。

埃尔顿先生要把画像带到伦敦,选个镜框,指点怎么装置。爱玛就想把画像包扎好,既能保证安然无恙,又不给埃尔顿先生带来许多麻烦,而埃尔顿先生好像生怕麻烦不多似的。

“多么珍贵的画呀!”他接过画像,轻轻叹了口气,说道。

“这个人简直太殷勤了,不大会坠人情网,”爱玛心想。“话可以这么说,不过坠人情网有种种方式。他是个出色的青年,与哈丽特正相匹配。正如他自己说的,‘分毫不差’。不过,他还真是在叹息,在害相思病,满嘴的恭维话,我要是他的主要恭维对象,那可真要受不了。我作为次要恭维对象,也听到了不少恭维话。不过,他那是感激我对哈丽特好罢了。”


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 gratitude p6wyS     
adj.感激,感谢
参考例句:
  • I have expressed the depth of my gratitude to him.我向他表示了深切的谢意。
  • She could not help her tears of gratitude rolling down her face.她感激的泪珠禁不住沿着面颊流了下来。
2 remarkably EkPzTW     
ad.不同寻常地,相当地
参考例句:
  • I thought she was remarkably restrained in the circumstances. 我认为她在那种情况下非常克制。
  • He made a remarkably swift recovery. 他康复得相当快。
3 hesitation tdsz5     
n.犹豫,踌躇
参考例句:
  • After a long hesitation, he told the truth at last.踌躇了半天,他终于直说了。
  • There was a certain hesitation in her manner.她的态度有些犹豫不决。
4 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
5 liking mpXzQ5     
n.爱好;嗜好;喜欢
参考例句:
  • The word palate also means taste or liking.Palate这个词也有“口味”或“嗜好”的意思。
  • I must admit I have no liking for exaggeration.我必须承认我不喜欢夸大其词。
6 scruple eDOz7     
n./v.顾忌,迟疑
参考例句:
  • It'seemed to her now that she could marry him without the remnant of a scruple.她觉得现在她可以跟他成婚而不需要有任何顾忌。
  • He makes no scruple to tell a lie.他说起谎来无所顾忌。
7 attachment POpy1     
n.附属物,附件;依恋;依附
参考例句:
  • She has a great attachment to her sister.她十分依恋她的姐姐。
  • She's on attachment to the Ministry of Defense.她现在隶属于国防部。
8 graceful deHza     
adj.优美的,优雅的;得体的
参考例句:
  • His movements on the parallel bars were very graceful.他的双杠动作可帅了!
  • The ballet dancer is so graceful.芭蕾舞演员的姿态是如此的优美。
9 infinitely 0qhz2I     
adv.无限地,无穷地
参考例句:
  • There is an infinitely bright future ahead of us.我们有无限光明的前途。
  • The universe is infinitely large.宇宙是无限大的。
10 gallant 66Myb     
adj.英勇的,豪侠的;(向女人)献殷勤的
参考例句:
  • Huang Jiguang's gallant deed is known by all men. 黄继光的英勇事迹尽人皆知。
  • These gallant soldiers will protect our country.这些勇敢的士兵会保卫我们的国家的。
11 skilful 8i2zDY     
(=skillful)adj.灵巧的,熟练的
参考例句:
  • The more you practise,the more skilful you'll become.练习的次数越多,熟练的程度越高。
  • He's not very skilful with his chopsticks.他用筷子不大熟练。
12 disposition GljzO     
n.性情,性格;意向,倾向;排列,部署
参考例句:
  • He has made a good disposition of his property.他已对财产作了妥善处理。
  • He has a cheerful disposition.他性情开朗。
13 amiable hxAzZ     
adj.和蔼可亲的,友善的,亲切的
参考例句:
  • She was a very kind and amiable old woman.她是个善良和气的老太太。
  • We have a very amiable companionship.我们之间存在一种友好的关系。
14 animation UMdyv     
n.活泼,兴奋,卡通片/动画片的制作
参考例句:
  • They are full of animation as they talked about their childhood.当他们谈及童年的往事时都非常兴奋。
  • The animation of China made a great progress.中国的卡通片制作取得很大发展。
15 likeness P1txX     
n.相像,相似(之处)
参考例句:
  • I think the painter has produced a very true likeness.我认为这位画家画得非常逼真。
  • She treasured the painted likeness of her son.她珍藏她儿子的画像。
16 exquisite zhez1     
adj.精美的;敏锐的;剧烈的,感觉强烈的
参考例句:
  • I was admiring the exquisite workmanship in the mosaic.我当时正在欣赏镶嵌画的精致做工。
  • I still remember the exquisite pleasure I experienced in Bali.我依然记得在巴厘岛所经历的那种剧烈的快感。
17 entreat soexj     
v.恳求,恳请
参考例句:
  • Charles Darnay felt it hopeless entreat him further,and his pride was touched besides.查尔斯-达尔内感到再恳求他已是枉然,自尊心也受到了伤害。
  • I entreat you to contribute generously to the building fund.我恳求您慷慨捐助建设基金。
18 specimens 91fc365099a256001af897127174fcce     
n.样品( specimen的名词复数 );范例;(化验的)抽样;某种类型的人
参考例句:
  • Astronauts have brought back specimens of rock from the moon. 宇航员从月球带回了岩石标本。
  • The traveler brought back some specimens of the rocks from the mountains. 那位旅行者从山上带回了一些岩石标本。 来自《简明英汉词典》
19 raptures 9c456fd812d0e9fdc436e568ad8e29c6     
极度欢喜( rapture的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Her heart melted away in secret raptures. 她暗自高兴得心花怒放。
  • The mere thought of his bride moves Pinkerton to raptures. 一想起新娘,平克顿不禁心花怒放。
20 peculiarity GiWyp     
n.独特性,特色;特殊的东西;怪癖
参考例句:
  • Each country has its own peculiarity.每个国家都有自己的独特之处。
  • The peculiarity of this shop is its day and nigth service.这家商店的特点是昼夜服务。
21 drawn MuXzIi     
v.拖,拉,拔出;adj.憔悴的,紧张的
参考例句:
  • All the characters in the story are drawn from life.故事中的所有人物都取材于生活。
  • Her gaze was drawn irresistibly to the scene outside.她的目光禁不住被外面的风景所吸引。
22 scruples 14d2b6347f5953bad0a0c5eebf78068a     
n.良心上的不安( scruple的名词复数 );顾虑,顾忌v.感到于心不安,有顾忌( scruple的第三人称单数 )
参考例句:
  • I overcame my moral scruples. 我抛开了道德方面的顾虑。
  • I'm not ashamed of my scruples about your family. They were natural. 我并未因为对你家人的顾虑而感到羞耻。这种感觉是自然而然的。 来自疯狂英语突破英语语调
23 portfolio 9OzxZ     
n.公事包;文件夹;大臣及部长职位
参考例句:
  • He remembered her because she was carrying a large portfolio.他因为她带着一个大公文包而记住了她。
  • He resigned his portfolio.他辞去了大臣职务。
24 excellence ZnhxM     
n.优秀,杰出,(pl.)优点,美德
参考例句:
  • His art has reached a high degree of excellence.他的艺术已达到炉火纯青的地步。
  • My performance is far below excellence.我的表演离优秀还差得远呢。
25 unwilling CjpwB     
adj.不情愿的
参考例句:
  • The natives were unwilling to be bent by colonial power.土著居民不愿受殖民势力的摆布。
  • His tightfisted employer was unwilling to give him a raise.他那吝啬的雇主不肯给他加薪。
26 accomplishment 2Jkyo     
n.完成,成就,(pl.)造诣,技能
参考例句:
  • The series of paintings is quite an accomplishment.这一系列的绘画真是了不起的成就。
  • Money will be crucial to the accomplishment of our objectives.要实现我们的目标,钱是至关重要的。
27 ecstasies 79e8aad1272f899ef497b3a037130d17     
狂喜( ecstasy的名词复数 ); 出神; 入迷; 迷幻药
参考例句:
  • In such ecstasies that he even controlled his tongue and was silent. 但他闭着嘴,一言不发。
  • We were in ecstasies at the thought of going home. 一想到回家,我们高兴极了。
28 complexion IOsz4     
n.肤色;情况,局面;气质,性格
参考例句:
  • Red does not suit with her complexion.红色与她的肤色不协调。
  • Her resignation puts a different complexion on things.她一辞职局面就全变了。
29 sketch UEyyG     
n.草图;梗概;素描;v.素描;概述
参考例句:
  • My sister often goes into the country to sketch. 我姐姐常到乡间去写生。
  • I will send you a slight sketch of the house.我将给你寄去房屋的草图。
30 vowed 6996270667378281d2f9ee561353c089     
起誓,发誓(vow的过去式与过去分词形式)
参考例句:
  • He vowed quite solemnly that he would carry out his promise. 他非常庄严地发誓要实现他的诺言。
  • I vowed to do more of the cooking myself. 我发誓自己要多动手做饭。
31 approbation INMyt     
n.称赞;认可
参考例句:
  • He tasted the wine of audience approbation.他尝到了像酒般令人陶醉的听众赞许滋味。
  • The result has not met universal approbation.该结果尚未获得普遍认同。
32 fixed JsKzzj     
adj.固定的,不变的,准备好的;(计算机)固定的
参考例句:
  • Have you two fixed on a date for the wedding yet?你们俩选定婚期了吗?
  • Once the aim is fixed,we should not change it arbitrarily.目标一旦确定,我们就不应该随意改变。
33 destined Dunznz     
adj.命中注定的;(for)以…为目的地的
参考例句:
  • It was destined that they would marry.他们结婚是缘分。
  • The shipment is destined for America.这批货物将运往美国。
34 honourable honourable     
adj.可敬的;荣誉的,光荣的
参考例句:
  • I don't think I am worthy of such an honourable title.这样的光荣称号,我可担当不起。
  • I hope to find an honourable way of settling difficulties.我希望设法找到一个体面的办法以摆脱困境。
35 countenance iztxc     
n.脸色,面容;面部表情;vt.支持,赞同
参考例句:
  • At the sight of this photograph he changed his countenance.他一看见这张照片脸色就变了。
  • I made a fierce countenance as if I would eat him alive.我脸色恶狠狠地,仿佛要把他活生生地吞下去。
36 lessen 01gx4     
vt.减少,减轻;缩小
参考例句:
  • Regular exercise can help to lessen the pain.经常运动有助于减轻痛感。
  • They've made great effort to lessen the noise of planes.他们尽力减小飞机的噪音。
37 displeased 1uFz5L     
a.不快的
参考例句:
  • The old man was displeased and darted an angry look at me. 老人不高兴了,瞪了我一眼。
  • He was displeased about the whole affair. 他对整个事情感到很不高兴。
38 complaisance 1Xky2     
n.彬彬有礼,殷勤,柔顺
参考例句:
  • She speaks with complaisance.她说话彬彬有礼。
  • His complaisance leaves a good impression on her.他的彬彬有礼给她留下了深刻的印象。
39 considerably 0YWyQ     
adv.极大地;相当大地;在很大程度上
参考例句:
  • The economic situation has changed considerably.经济形势已发生了相当大的变化。
  • The gap has narrowed considerably.分歧大大缩小了。
40 elegance QjPzj     
n.优雅;优美,雅致;精致,巧妙
参考例句:
  • The furnishings in the room imparted an air of elegance.这个房间的家具带给这房间一种优雅的气氛。
  • John has been known for his sartorial elegance.约翰因为衣着讲究而出名。
41 standing 2hCzgo     
n.持续,地位;adj.永久的,不动的,直立的,不流动的
参考例句:
  • After the earthquake only a few houses were left standing.地震过后只有几幢房屋还立着。
  • They're standing out against any change in the law.他们坚决反对对法律做任何修改。
42 promising BkQzsk     
adj.有希望的,有前途的
参考例句:
  • The results of the experiments are very promising.实验的结果充满了希望。
  • We're trying to bring along one or two promising young swimmers.我们正设法培养出一两名有前途的年轻游泳选手。
43 entreated 945bd967211682a0f50f01c1ca215de3     
恳求,乞求( entreat的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • They entreated and threatened, but all this seemed of no avail. 他们时而恳求,时而威胁,但这一切看来都没有用。
  • 'One word,' the Doctor entreated. 'Will you tell me who denounced him?' “还有一个问题,”医生请求道,“你可否告诉我是谁告发他的?” 来自英汉文学 - 双城记
44 eyebrows a0e6fb1330e9cfecfd1c7a4d00030ed5     
眉毛( eyebrow的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Eyebrows stop sweat from coming down into the eyes. 眉毛挡住汗水使其不能流进眼睛。
  • His eyebrows project noticeably. 他的眉毛特别突出。
45 prettily xQAxh     
adv.优美地;可爱地
参考例句:
  • It was prettily engraved with flowers on the back.此件雕刻精美,背面有花饰图案。
  • She pouted prettily at him.她冲他撅着嘴,样子很可爱。
46 thoroughly sgmz0J     
adv.完全地,彻底地,十足地
参考例句:
  • The soil must be thoroughly turned over before planting.一定要先把土地深翻一遍再下种。
  • The soldiers have been thoroughly instructed in the care of their weapons.士兵们都系统地接受过保护武器的训练。
47 applied Tz2zXA     
adj.应用的;v.应用,适用
参考例句:
  • She plans to take a course in applied linguistics.她打算学习应用语言学课程。
  • This cream is best applied to the face at night.这种乳霜最好晚上擦脸用。
48 distress 3llzX     
n.苦恼,痛苦,不舒适;不幸;vt.使悲痛
参考例句:
  • Nothing could alleviate his distress.什么都不能减轻他的痛苦。
  • Please don't distress yourself.请你不要忧愁了。
49 entreaties d56c170cf2a22c1ecef1ae585b702562     
n.恳求,乞求( entreaty的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He began with entreaties and ended with a threat. 他先是恳求,最后是威胁。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The tyrant was deaf to the entreaties of the slaves. 暴君听不到奴隶们的哀鸣。 来自《简明英汉词典》
50 languish K9Mze     
vi.变得衰弱无力,失去活力,(植物等)凋萎
参考例句:
  • Without the founder's drive and direction,the company gradually languished.没有了创始人的斗志与指引,公司逐渐走向没落。
  • New products languish on the drawing board.新产品在计划阶段即告失败。


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