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Chapter 6
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COLONEL AURELIANO BUENDíA organized thirty--two armed uprisings and he lost them all. He had seventeen male children by seventeen different women and they were exterminated1 one after the other on a single night before the oldest one had reached the age of thirty-five. He survived fourteen attempts on his life, seventy-three ambushes2, and a firing squad3. He lived through a dose of strychnine in his coffee that was enough to kill a horse. He refused the Order of Merit, which the President of the Republic awarded him. He rose to be Commander in Chief of the revolutionary forces, with jurisdiction4 and command from one border to the other, and the man most feared by the government, but he never let himself be photographed. He declined the lifetime pension offered him after the war and until old age he made his living from the little gold fishes that he manufactured in his workshop in Macondo. Although he always fought at the head of his men, the only wound that he received was the one he gave himself after signing the Treaty of Neerlandia, which put an end to almost twenty years of civil war. He shot himself in the chest with a pistol and the bullet came out through his back without damaging any vital organ. The only thing left of all that was a street that bore his name in Macondo. And yet, as he declared a few years before he died of old age, he had not expected any of that on the dawn he left with his twenty-one men to join the forces of General Victorio Medina.
"We leave Macondo in your care." was all that he said to Arcadio before leaving. "We leave it to you in good shape, try to have it in better shape when we return."
Arcadio gave a very personal interpretation5 to the instructions. He invented a uniform with the braid and epaulets of a marshal, inspired by the prints in one of Melquíades' books, and around his waist he buckled6 the saber with gold tassels7 that had belonged to the executed captain. He set up the two artillery8 pieces at the entrance to town, put uniforms on his former pupils, who had been amused by his fiery9 proclamations, and let them wander through the streets armed in order to give outsiders an impression of invulnerability. It was a doubleedged deception10, for the government did not dare attack the place for ten months, but when it did it unleashed11 such a large force against it that resistance was liquidated12 in a half hour. From the first day of his rule Arcadio revealed his predilection13 for decrees. He would read as many as four a day in order to decree and institute everything that came into his head. He imposed obligatory14 military service for men over eighteen, declared to be public property any animals walking the streets after six in the evening, and made men who were overage wear red armbands. He sequestered15 Father Nicanor in the parish house under pain of execution and prohibited from saying mass or ringing the bells unless it was for a Liberal victory. In order that no one would doubt the severity of his aims, he ordered a firing squad organized in the square and had it shoot at a scarecrow. At first no one took him seriously. They were, after all, schoolchildren playing at being grownups. But one night, when Arcadio went into Catarino's store, the trumpeter in the group greeted him with a fanfare16 that made the customers laugh and Arcadio had him shot for disrespect for the authorities. People who protested were put on bread and water with their ankles in a set of stocks that he had set up in a schoolroom. "You murderer!" úrsula would shout at him every time she learned of some new arbitrary act. "When Aureliano finds out he's going to shoot you and I'll be the first one to be glad." But it was of no use. Arcadio continued tightening17 the tourniquet18 with unnecessary rigor19 until he became the cruelest ruler that Macondo had ever known. "Now let them suffer the difference," Don Apolinar Moscote said on one occasion. "This is the Liberal paradise." Arcadio found out about it. At the head of a patrol he assaulted the house, destroyed the furniture, flogged the daughters, and dragged out Don Apolinar Moscote. When úrsula burst into the courtyard of headquarters, after having gone through the town shouting shame brandishing20 with rage a pitch-covered whip, Arcadio himself was preparing to give the squad the command to fire.
"I dare you to, bastard21!" úrsula shouted.
Before Arcadio had time to read she let go with the first blow of the lash22. "I dare you to, murderer!" she shouted. "And kill me too, son an evil mother. That way I won't have the eyes to weep for the shame of having raised a monster." Whipping him without mercy, she chased him to the back of the courtyard, where Arcadio curled up like a snail23 in its shell. Don Apolinar Moscote was unconscious, tied to the post where previously24 they had had the scarecrow that had been cut to pieces by shots fired in fun. The boys in the squad scattered25, fearful that úrsula would go after them too. But she did not even look at them. She left Arcadio with his uniform torn, roaring with pain and rage, and she untied26 Don Apolinar Moscote and took him home. Before leaving the headquarters she released the prisoners from the stocks.
From that time on she was the one who ruled in the town. She reestablished Sunday masses, suspended the use of red armbands, and abrogated27 the harebrained decrees. But in spite of her strength, she still wept over her unfortunate fate. She felt so much alone that she sought the useless company of her husband, who had been forgotten under the chestnut28 tree. "Look what we've come to," she would tell him as the June rains threatened to knock the shelter down. "Look at the empty house, our children scattered all over the world, and the two of us alone again, the same as in the beginning." José Arcadio Buendía, sunk in an abyss of unawareness29, was deaf to her lamentations. At the beginning of his madness he would announce his daily needs with urgent Latin phrases. In fleeting31 clear spells of lucidity32, when Amaranta would bring him his meals he would tell her what bothered him most and would accept her sucking glasses and mustard plasters in a docile33 way. But at the time when úrsula went to lament30 by his side he had lost all contact with reality. She would bathe him bit by bit as he sat on his stool while she gave him news of the family. "Aureliano went to war more than four months ago and we haven't heard anything about him," she would say, scrubbing his back with a soaped brush. "José Arcadio came back a big man, taller than you, all covered with needle-work, but he only brought shame to our house." She thought she noticed, however, that her husband would grow sad with the bad news. Then she decided34 to lie to him. 'Rou won't believe what I'm going to tell you," she said as she threw ashes over his excrement35 in order to pick it up with the shovel36. "God willed that José Arcadio and Rebeca should get married, and now they're very happy." She got to be so sincere in the deception that she ended up by consoling herself with her own lies. "Arcadio is a serious man now," she said, "and very brave, and a fine-looking young man with his uniform and saber." It was like speaking to a dead man, for José Arcadio Buendía was already beyond the reach of any worry. But she insisted. He seemed so peaceful, so indifferent to everything that she decided to release him. He did not even move from his stool. He stayed there, exposed to the sun and the rain, as if the thongs37 were unnecessary, for a dominion38 superior to any visible bond kept tied to the trunk of the chestnut tree. Toward August, when winter began to last forever, úrsula was finally able to give him a piece of news that sounded like the truth.
"Would you believe it that good luck is still pouring down on us?" she told him. "Amaranta and the pianola Italian are going to get married."
Amaranta and Pietro Crespi had, in fact, deepened their friendship, protected by úrsula, who this time did not think it necessary to watch over the visits. It was a twilight39 engagement. The Italian would arrive at dusk, with a gardenia40 in his buttonhole, and he would translate Petrarch's sonnets41 for Amaranta. They would sit on the porch, suffocated42 by the oregano and the roses, he reading and she sewing lace cuffs43, indifferent to the shocks and bad news the war, until the mosquitoes made them take refuge in the parlor44. Amaranta's sensibility, her discreet45 but enveloping46 tenderness had been wearing an invisible web about her fiancé, which he had to push aside materially his pale and ringless fingers in order to leave the house at eight o'clock. They had put together a delightful47 album with the postcards that Pietro Crespi received from Italy. They were pictures of lovers in lonely parks, vignettes of hearts pierced with arrows and golden ribbons held by doves. "I've been to this park in Florence," Pietro Crespi would say, going through the cards. "A person can put out his hand and the birds will come to feed." Sometimes, over a watercolor of Venice, nostalgia48 would transform the smell of mud and putrefying shellfish of the canals into the warm aroma49 of flowers. Amaranta would sigh, laugh, and dream of a second homeland of handsome men and beautiful women who spoke50 a childlike language with ancient cities of whose past grandeur51 only the cats among the rubble52 remained. After crossing the ocean in search of it, after having confused passion with the vehement53 stroking of Rebeca, Pietro Crespi had found love. Happiness was accompanied by prosperity. His warehouse54 at that time occupied almost a whole block and it was a hothouse of fantasy, with reproductions of the bell tower of Florence that told time with a concert of carillons, and music boxes from Sorrento and compacts from China that sang five-note melodies when they were opened, and all the musical instruments imaginable and all the mechanical toys that could be conceived. Bruno Crespi, his younger brother, was in charge of the store because Pietro Crespi barely had enough time to take care the music school. Thanks to him the Street of the Turks, with its dazzling display of knickknacks, became a melodic55 oasis56 where one could forget Arcadio's arbitrary acts and the distant nightmare of the war. When úrsula ordered the revival57 of Sunday mass, Pietro Crespi donated a German harmonium to the church, organized a children's chorus, and prepared a Gregorian repertory that added a note of splendor58 to Father Nicanor's quiet rite59. No one doubted that he would make Amaranta a fortunate mate. Not pushing their feelings, letting themselves be borne along by the natural flow of their hearth60 they reached a point where all that was left to do was set a wedding date. They did not encounter any obstacles. úrsula accused herself inwardly of having twisted Rebecca's destiny with repeated postponements and she was not about to add more remorse61. The rigor of the mourning for Remedios had been relegated62 to the background by the mortifications of the war, Aureliano's absence, Arcadio's brutality63, and the expulsion José Arcadio and Rebeca. With the imminence64 of the wedding, Pietro Crespi had hinted that Aureliano José, in whom he had stirred up a love that was almost filial, would be considered their oldest child. Everything made Amaranta think that she was heading toward a smooth happiness. But unlike Rebeca, she did not reveal the slightest anxiety. With the same patience with which she dyed tablecloths65, sewed lace masterpieces, embroidered67 needlepoint peacocks, she waited for Pietro Crespi to be unable to bear the urges of his heart and more. Her day came with the illfated October rains. Pietro Crespi took the sewing basket from her lap and he told her, "We'll get married next month." Amaranta did not tremble at the contact with his icy hands. She withdrew hers like a timid little animal and went back to her work.
"Don't be simple, Crespi." She smiled. "I wouldn't marry you even if I were dead."
Pietro Crespi lost control of himself. He wept shamelessly, almost breaking his fingers with desperation, but he could not break her down. "Don't waste your time," was all that Amaranta said. "If you really love me so much, don't set foot in this house again." úrsula thought she would go mad with shame. Pietro Crespi exhausted69 all manner of pleas. He went through incredible extremes of humiliation70. He wept one whole afternoon in úrsula's lap and she would have sold her soul in order to comfort him. On rainy nights he could be seen prowling about the house with an umbrella, waiting for a light in Amaranta's bedroom. He was never better dressed than at that time. His august head of a tormented71 emperor had acquired a strange air of grandeur. He begged Amaranta's friends, the ones who sewed with her on the porch, to try to persuade her. He neglected his business. He would spend the day in the rear of the store writing wild notes, which he would send to Amaranta with flower petals72 and dried butterflies, and which she would return unopened. He would shut himself up for hours on end to play the zither. One night he sang. Macondo woke up in a kind of angelic stupor73 that was caused by a zither that deserved more than this world and a voice that led one to believe that no other person on earth could feel such love. Pietro Crespi then saw the lights go on in every window in town except that of Amaranta. On November second, All Souls' Day, his brother opened the store and found all the lamps lighted, all the music boxes opened, and all the docks striking an interminable hour, in the midst of that mad concert he found Pietro Crespi at the desk in the rear with his wrists cut by a razor and his hands thrust into a basin of benzoin.
úrsula decreed that the wake would be in house. Father Nicanor was against a religious ceremony and burial in consecrated74 ground. úrsula stood up to him. "In a way that neither you nor I can understand, that man was a saint," she said. "So I am going to bury him, against your wishes, beside Melquíades' grave." She did it the support of the whole town and with a magnificent funeral. Amaranta did not leave her bedroom. From her bed she heard úrsula's weeping, the steps and whispers of the multitude that invaded the house, the wailing75 of the mourners, and then a deep silence that smelled of trampled76 flowers. For a long time she kept on smelling Pietro Crespi's lavender breath at dusk, but she had the strength not to succumb77 to delirium78. úrsula abandoned her. She did not even raise her eyes to pity her on the afternoon when Amaranta went into the kitchen and put her hand into the coals of the stove until it hurt her so much that she felt no more pain but instead smelled the pestilence79 of her own singed80 flesh. It was a stupid cure for her remorse. For several days she went about the house with her hand in a pot of egg whites, and when the burns healed it appeared as if the whites had also scarred over the sores on her heart. The only external trace that the tragedy left was the bandage of black gauze that she put on her burned hand and that she wore until her death.

Arcadio gave a rare display of generosity81 by decreeing official mourning for Pietro Crespi. úrsula interpreted it as the return of the strayed lamb. But she was mistaken. She had lost Arcadio, not when he had put on his military uniform, but from the beginning. She thought she had raised him as a son, as she had raised Rebeca, with no privileges or discrimination. Nevertheless, Arcadio was a solitary82 and frightened child during the insomnia83 plague, in the midst of úrsula's utilitarian84 fervor85, during the delirium of José Arcadio Buendía, the hermetism of Aureliano, and the mortal rivalry86 between Amaranta Rebeca. Aureliano had taught him to read and write, thinking about other things, as he would have done with a stranger. He gave him his clothing so that Visitación could take it in when it was ready to be thrown away. Arcadio suffered from shoes that were too large, from his patched pants, from his female buttocks. He never succeeded in communicating with anyone better than he did with Visitación and Cataure in their language. Melquíades was the only one who really was concerned with him as he made him listen to his incomprehensible texts and gave him lessons in the art of daguerreotype87. No one imagined how much he wept in secret and the desperation with which he tried to revive Melquíades with the useless study of his papers. The school, where they paid attention to him and respected him, and then power, with his endless decrees and his glorious uniform, freed him from the weight of an old bitterness. One night in Catarino's store someone dared tell him, "you don't deserve the last name you carry." Contrary to what everyone expected, Arcadio did not have him shot.
"To my great honor," he said, "I am not a Buendía."
Those who knew the secret of his parentage thought that the answer meant that he too was aware of it, but he had really never been. Pilar Ternera, his mother, who had made his blood boil in the darkroom, was as much an irresistible88 obsession89 for him as she had been first for José Arcadio and then for Aureliano. In spite of her having lost her charms the splendor of her laugh, he sought her out and found her by the trail of her smell of smoke. A short time before the war, one noon when she was later than usual in coming for her younger son at school, Arcadio was waiting for her in the room where he was accustomed to take his siesta90 and where he later set up the stocks. While the child played in the courtyard, he waited in his hammock, trembling with anxiety, knowing that Pillar Ternera would have to pass through there. She arrived. Arcadio grabbed her by the wrist and tried to pull her into the hammock. "I can't, I can't," Pilar Ternera said in horror. "You can't imagine how much I would like to make you happy, but as God is my witness I can't." Arcadio took by the waist with his tremendous hereditary91 strength and he felt the world disappear with the contact of her skin. "Don't play the saint," he said. "After all, everybody knows that you're a whore." Pilar overcame the disgust that her miserable92 fate inspired in her.
"The children will find out," she murmured. "It will be better if you leave the bar off the door tonight."
The only relatives who knew about it were José Arcadio and Rebeca, with whom Arcadio maintained close relations at that time, based not so much on kinship as on complicity. José Arcadio had put his neck into the marital93 yoke94. Rebeca's firm character, the voracity95 stomach, her tenacious96 ambition absorbed the tremendous energy of her husband, who had been changed from a lazy, womanchasing man into an enormous work animal. They kept a clean and neat house. Rebeca would open it wide at dawn and the wind from the graveyard97 would come in through the windows and go out through the doors to the yard and leave the whitewashed98 walls and furniture tanned by the saltpeter of the dead. Her hunger for earth, the cloccloc of her parents' bones, the impatience99 of her blood as it faced Pietro Crespi's passivity were relegated to the attic100 of her memory. All day long she would embroider66 beside the window, withdrawn101 from the uneasiness of the war, until the ceramic103 pots would begin to vibrate in the cupboard and she would get up to warm the meal, much before the appearance, first, of the mangy hounds, and then of the colossus in leggings and spurs with a double-barreled shotgun, who sometimes carried a deer on his shoulder and almost always a string rabbits or wild ducks. One afternoon, at the beginning of his rule, Arcadio paid them a surprise visit. They had not seen him since they had left the house, but he seemed so friendly and familiar that they invited him to share the stew104.
Only when they were having coffee did Arcadio reveal the motive105 behind his visit: he had received a complaint against José Arcadio. It was said that he had begun by plowing106 his own yard and had gone straight ahead into neighboring lands, knocking down fences and buildings with his oxen until he took forcible possession of the best plots of land around. On the peasants whom he had not despoiled107 because he was not interested in their lands, he levied108 a contribution which he collected every Saturday with his hunting dogs and his double-barreled shotgun. He did not deny it. He based his right on the fact that the usurped109 lands had been distributed by José Arcadio Buendía at the time of the founding, and he thought it possible to prove that his father had been crazy ever since that time, for he had disposed of a patrimony110 that really belonged to the family. It was an unnecessary allegation, because Arcadio had not come to do justice. He simply offered to set up a registry office so that José Arcadio could legalize his title to the usurped land, under the condition that he delegate to the local government the right to collect the contributions. They made an agreement. Years later, when Colonel Aureliano Buendía examined the titles to property, he found registered in his brother's name all of the land between the hill where his yard was on up to the horizon, including the cemetery111, and discovered that during the eleven months of his rule, Arcadio had collected not only the money of the contributions, but had also collected fees from people for the right to bury their dead in José Arcadio's land.
It took úrsula several months to find out what was already public knowledge because people hid it from her so as not to increase her suffering. At first she suspected it. "Arcadio is building a house," she confided112 with feigned113 pride to her husband as she tried to put a spoonful of calabash syrup114 into his mouth. Nevertheless, she involuntarily sighed and said, "I don't know why, but all this has a bad smell to me." Later on, when she found out that Arcadio had not only built a house but had ordered some Viennese furniture, she confirmed her suspicion that he was using public funds. "You're the shame of our family name," she shouted at him one Sunday after mass when she saw him in his new house playing cards with his officers. Arcadio paid no attention to her. Only then did úrsula know that he had a six-month-old daughter and that Santa Sofía de la Piedad, with whom he was living outside of marriage, was pregnant again. She decided to write to Colonel Aureliano Buendía, wherever he was, to bring him up to date on the situation. But the fast-moving events of those days not only prevented her plans from being carried out, they made her regret having conceived them. The war, which until then had been only a word to designate a vague and remote circumstance, became a concrete and dramatic reality. Around the end of February an old woman with an ashen115 look arrived in Macondo riding a donkey loaded down with brooms. She seemed so inoffensive that the sentries116 let her pass without any questions as another vendor117, one of the many who often arrived from the towns in the swamp. She went directly to the barracks. Arcadio received her in the place where the classroom used to be and which at that time had been transformed into a kind of rearguard encampment, with roiled118 hammocks hanging on hooks and mats piled up in the corners, and rifles and carbines and even hunting shotguns scattered on the floor. The old woman stiffened119 into a military salute120 before identifying herself:
"I am Colonel Gregorio Stevenson."
He brought bad news. The last centers Liberal resistance, according to what he said, were being wiped out. Colonel Aureliano Buendía, whom he had left fighting in retreat near Riohacha, had given him a message for Arcadio. He should surrender the town without resistance on the condition that the lives and property of Liberals would be respected. Arcadio examined that strange messenger who could have been a fugitive121 grandmother with a look of pity.
"You have brought something in writing, naturally," he said.
"Naturally," the emissary answered, "I have brought nothing of the sort. It's easy to understand that under the present circumstances a person can't carry anything that would compromise him."
As he was speaking he reached into his bodice and took out a small gold fish. "I think that this will be sufficient," he said. Arcadio could see that indeed it was one of the little fishes made by Colonel Aureliano Buendía. But anyone could have bought it before the war or stolen it, and it had no merit as a safe-conduct pass. The messenger even went to the extreme of violating a military secret so that they would believe his identity. He revealed that he was on a mission to Cura鏰o, where he hoped to recruit exiles from all over the Caribbean and acquire arms and supplies sufficient to attempt a landing at the end of the year. With faith in that plan, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was not in favor of any useless sacrifices at that time. But Arcadio was inflexible122. He had the prisoner put into the stocks until he could prove his identity and he resolved to defend the town to the death.
He did not have long to wait. The news of the Liberal defeat was more and more concrete. Toward the end March, before a dawn of premature123 rain, the tense calm of the previous weeks was abruptly124 broken by the desperate sounds of a cornet and a cannon125 shot that knocked down the steeple of the church. Actually, Arcadio's decision to resist was madness. He had only fifty poorly armed men with a ration68 of twenty cartridges126 apiece. But among them, his former pupils, excited by the high-sounding proclamations, the determination reigned127 to sacrifice their skins for a lost cause. In the midst of the tramping of boots, contradictory128 commands, cannon shots that made the earth tremble, wild shooting, and the senseless sound of cornets, the supposed Colonel Stevenson managed to speak to Arcadio. "Don't let me undergo the indignity129 of dying in the stocks in these women's clothes," he said to him. "If I have to die, let me die fighting." He succeeded in convincing him. Arcadio ordered them to give him a weapon and twenty cartridges, and he left him with five men to defend headquarters while he went off with his staff to head up the resistance. He did not get to the road to the swamp. The barricades130 had been broken and the defenders131 were openly fighting in the streets, first until they used up their ration rifle bullets, then with pistols against rifles, and finally hto hand. With the imminence of defeat, some women went into the street armed with sticks and kitchen knives. In that confusion Arcadio found Amaranta, who was looking for him like a madwoman, in her nightgown two old pistols that had belonged to José Arcadio Buendía. He gave his rifle to an officer who had been disarmed132 in the fight and escaped with Amaranta through a nearby street to take her home. úrsula was, in the doorway133 waiting, indifferent to the cannon shots that had opened up a hole in the front of the house next door. The rain was letting up, but the streets were as slippery and as smooth as melted soap, and one had to guess distances in the darkness. Arcadio left Amaranta with úrsula and made an attempt to face two soldiers who had opened up with heavy firing from the corner. The old pistols that had been kept for many years in the bureau did not work. Protecting Arcadio with her body, úrsula tried to drag him toward the house.
"Come along in the name of God," she shouted at him. "There's been enough madness!"
The soldiers aimed at them.
"Let go of that man, ma'am," one of them shouted, "or we won't be responsible!"
Arcadio pushed úrsula toward the house and surrendered. A short time later the shooting stopped and the bells began to toll134. The resistance had been wiped out in less than half an hour. Not a single one of Arcadio's men had survived the attack, but before dying they had killed three hundred soldiers. The last stronghold was the barracks. Before being attacked, the supposed Colonel Gregorio Stevenson had freed the prisoners and ordered his men to go out and fight in the street. The extraordinary mobility135 and accurate aim which he placed his twenty cartridges gave the impression that the barracks was well-defended, and the attackers blew it to pieces with cannon fire. The captain who directed the operation was startled to find the rubble deserted136 and a single dead man in his undershorts with an empty rifle still clutched in an arm that had been blown completely off. He had a woman's full head of hair held at the neck with a comb and on his neck a chain with a small gold fish. When he turned him over the tip of his boot and put the light on his face, the captain was perplexed137. "Jesus Christ," he exclaimed. Other officers came over.
"Look where this fellow turned up," the captain said. "It's Gregorio Stevenson."
Before they took him to the execution wall FatNicanor tried to attend him. "I have nothing to repent," Arcadio said, and he put himself under the orders of the squad after drinking a cup of black coffee. The leader of the squad, a specialist in summary executions, had a name that had much more about it than chance: Captain Roque Carnicero, which meant butcher. On the way to the cemetery, under the persistent138 drizzle139, Arcadio saw that a radiant Wednesday was breaking out on the horizon. His nostalgia disappeared with the mist and left an immense curiosity in its place. Only when they ordered him to put his back to the wall did Arcadio see Rebeca, with wet hair and a pink flowered dress, opening wide the door. He made an effort to get her to recognize him. And Rebeca did take a casual look toward the wall and was paralyzed with stupor, barely able to react and wave goodbye to Arcadio. Arcadio answered her the same way. At that instant the smoking mouths of the rifles were aimed at him and letter by letter he heard the encyclicals that Melquíades had chanted and he heard the lost steps of Santa Sofía de la Piedad, a virgin140, in the classroom, and in his nose he felt the same icy hardness that had drawn102 his attention in the nostrils141 of the corpse142 of Remedios. "Oh, God damn it!" he managed to think. "I forgot to say that if it was a girl they should name her Remedios." Then, all accumulated in the rip of a claw, he felt again all the terror that had tormented him in his life. The captain gave the order to fire. Arcadio barely had time to put out his chest and raise his head, not understanding where the hot liquid that burned his thighs143 was pouring from.
"Bastards144!" he shouted. "Long live the Liberal Party!"

 

奥雷连诺上校发动了三十二次武装起义,三十二次都遭到了失败。他跟十六个女人生了十七个儿子,这些儿子都在一个晚上接二连三被杀死了,其中最大的还不满三十五岁。他自己遭到过十四次暗杀、七十二次埋伏和一次枪决,但都幸免于难。他喝了一杯掺有士的宁(注:一种毒药)的咖啡,剂量足以毒死一匹马,可他也活过来了。他拒绝了共和国总统授予他的荣誉勋章。他曾升为革命军总司令,在全国广大地区拥有生杀予夺之权,成了政府最畏惧的人物,但他从来没有让人给他拍过照。战争结束以后,他拒绝了政府给他的终身养老金,直到年老都在马孔多作坊里制作小金鱼为生。尽管他作战时经常身先士卒,但他唯一的伤却是他亲手造成的,那是结束二十年内战的尼兰德投降书签订之后的事。他用手枪朝自己的胸膛开了一枪,子弹穿过脊背,可是没有击中要害。这一切的结果不过是马扎多的一条街道拿他命了名。

然而,据他自己寿终之前不久承认,那天早晨,他率领二十一人的队伍离开马孔多,去投奔维克多里奥·麦丁纳将军的部队时,他是没有想到这些的。

“我们把这个镇子交给你了,”他离开时向阿卡蒂奥说。“你瞧,我们是把它好好儿交给你的,到我们回来的时候,它该更好了。”

阿卡蒂奥对这个指示作了十分独特的解释。他看了梅尔加德斯书里的彩色插图,受到启发,就给自己设计了一套制服,制服上面配了元帅的饰带和肩章,并且在腰边挂了一把带有金色穗子的军刀;这把军刀本来是属于那个已经被枪决的上尉的。然后,他在市镇人口处安了两门大炮,鼓动他以往的学生,叫他们穿上军服,把他们武装起来,让他们耀武扬威地走过街头,使人从旁看出这个镇子是坚不可摧的。其实,这个鬼把戏未必有用:的确,几乎整整一年,政府不敢发出进攻马孔多的命令,可是最终决定大举猛攻这个镇子时,半小时之内就把抵抗镇压下去了。阿卡蒂奥在执掌政权之初,对发号施令表现了很大的爱好。有时,他一天发布四项命令,想干什么就干什么。他规定年满十八岁的人都须服兵役,宣布晚上六时以后出现在街上的牲畜为公共财产,强迫中年男人戴上红臂章。他把尼康诺神父关在家里,禁止外出,否则枪毙:只有在庆祝自由党胜利时,才准做弥撒、敲钟。为了让大家知道他并不想说着玩玩,他命令一队士兵在广场上向稻草人练习射击。起初,谁也没有认真看待这些。归根到底,这些士兵不过是假装大人的小学生。有一天晚上,阿卡蒂奥走进卡塔林诺游艺场的时候,乐队小号手故意用军号声欢迎他,引起了哄堂大笑。阿卡蒂奥认为这个号手不尊重新的当局,下令把他枪毙了。那些敢于反对的人,他下令给他们戴上脚镣,把他们关在学校教室里,只让他们喝水、吃面包。“你是杀人犯!”乌苏娜每次听到他的横行霸道,都向他叫嚷。“奥雷连诺知道的时候,他会枪毙你,我第一个高兴。”然而一切都是枉然。阿卡蒂奥继续加强这种毫无必要的酷烈手段,终于成了马孔多不曾有过的暴君。“现在,镇上的人感到不同啦,”阿·摩斯柯特有一次说。“这就是自由党的天堂。”这些话传到了阿卡蒂奥耳里。他领着一队巡逻兵,闯进阿.摩斯柯特的住所,砸毁家具,抽打他的几个女儿,而把过去的镇长沿着街道朝兵营拖去。乌苏娜知道了这伴事情,非常惭愧,狂喊乱叫,愤怒地挥着树脂浸透的鞭子,撒腿奔过市镇;当她冲进兵营院子的时候,士兵们已经站好了枪毙阿·摩斯柯特先生的队列,阿卡蒂奥准备亲自发出“开枪”的命令。

“你敢,杂种!”乌苏娜叫道。

阿卡蒂奥还没清醒过来,她已拿粗大的牛筋鞭给了他一下子。“你敢,杀人犯,”她喝道。“你也杀死我吧,你这婊子养的。那样,我起码用不着因为喂大了你这个怪物而惭愧得流泪了。”她无情地追着阿卡蒂奥抽打,直到他躲在院中最远的一个角落里,象蜗牛似的蜷缩在那儿。绑在柱子上的阿·摩斯柯特先生已经失去知觉,在这之前,柱子上挂着一个被子弹打穿了许多窟窿的稻草人。行刑的小伙子们四散奔逃,生怕乌苏娜也拿他们出气。可她看都不看他们一眼。阿卡蒂奥的制服已经扯破,他又痛又恼,大声狂叫;乌苏娜把他撇在一边,就去松开阿·摩斯柯特先生,领他回家。但在离开兵营之前,她把戴着脚镣的犯人都给放了。

从这时起,乌苏娜开始掌管这个市镇。她恢复了星期日的弥撒,取消了红色臂章,宣布阿卡蒂奥轻率的命令无效。乌苏娜虽然表现勇敢,心中却悲叹自己的命运。她感到自己那么孤独,就去找被忘在栗树下的丈夫,向他无用地诉苦。“你瞧,咱们到了什么地步啦,”她向他说;周围是六月里的雨声,雨水很有冲毁棕榈棚的危险。“咱们的房子空啦,儿女们四分五散啦,象最初那样,又是咱们两人了。”可是,霍·阿·布恩蒂亚精神错乱,对她的抱怨听而不闻。最初丧失理智的时候,他还用半通不通的拉丁语说说日常生活的需要。在短暂的神志清醒当中,阿玛兰塔给他送饮食来的时候,他还向她诉说自己最大的痛苦,顺从地让她给他拨火罐、抹芥末膏。可是,乌苏娜开始到栗树下来诉苦时,他已失去了跟现实生活的一切联系。他坐在板凳上,乌苏娜一点一点地给他擦身,同时就谈家里的事。“奥雷连诺出去打仗,已经四个多月啦,我们一点都不知道他的消息,”她一面说,一面用抹了肥皂的刷子给丈夫擦背。“霍·阿卡蒂奥回来了,长得比你还高,全身刺满了花纹,可他只给我们家丢脸。”她觉得坏消息会使丈夫伤心,于是决定向他撒谎。“你别相信我刚才告诉你的话吧,”说着,她拿灰撒在他的粪便上,然后用铲子把它铲了起来。“感谢上帝,霍·阿卡蒂奥和雷贝卡结婚啦,现在他们挺幸福。”她学会了把假话说得十分逼真,自己也终于在捏造中寻得安慰。“阿卡蒂奥已经是个正经的人,很勇敢,穿上制服挺神气,还配带了一把军刀。”这等于跟死人说话,因为已经没有什么能使霍·阿·布恩蒂亚愉快和悲哀了。可是,乌苏娜继续跟丈夫唠叨。他是那么驯顺,对一切都很冷淡,她就决定给他松绑。松了绳子的霍·阿·布恩蒂亚,在板凳上动都不动一下。他就那么日晒雨淋,仿佛绳子没有任何意义,因为有一种比眼睛能够看见的绳索更强大的力量把他拴在粟树上。八月间,大家已经开始觉得战争将要永远拖延下去的时候,乌苏娜终于把她认为真实的消息告诉了大夫。

“好运气总是跟着咱们的,”她说。“阿玛兰塔和摆弄自动钢琴的意大利人快要结婚啦!”

在乌苏娜的信任下,阿玛兰塔和皮埃特罗·克列斯比的友好关系确实发展很快;现在,意大利人来访时,乌苏娜认为没有心要在场监视了。这是一种黄昏的幽会。皮埃特罗·克列斯比总是傍晚才来,钮扣孔眼里插一朵栀子花,把佩特拉克的十四行诗翻译给阿玛兰塔听。他俩坐在充满了玫瑰花和牛至花馨香的长廊上:他念诗,她就绣制花边袖口,两人都把战争的惊扰和变化抛到脑后;她的敏感、审慎和掩藏的温情,仿佛蛛网一样把未婚夫缠绕起来,每当晚上八时他起身离开的时候,他都不得不用没戴戒指的苍白手指拨开这些看不见的蛛网,他跟阿玛兰塔·起做了一个精美的明信画片册,这些明信画片都是他从意大利带来的。在每张明信片上,都有一对情人呆在公园绿树丛中的僻静角落里,还有一些小花饰--箭穿的红心或者两只鸽子用嘴衔着的一条金色丝带。“我去过佛罗伦萨的这个公园,”皮埃特罗·克列斯比翻阅着画片说。“只要伸出下去,鸟儿就会飞来啄食。”有时,看到一幅威尼斯水彩画,他的怀乡之情会把水沟里的淤泥气味和海中贝壳的腐臭昧儿变成鲜花的香气。阿玛兰塔一面叹息一面笑,并且憧憬着那个国家,那里的男男女女都挺漂亮,说起话来象孩子,那里有古老的城市,它们往日的宏伟建筑只剩下了在瓦砾堆里乱刨的几只小猫。皮埃特罗·克列斯比漂洋过海追求爱情,并且把雷贝卡的感情冲动跟爱情混为一谈,但他总算得到了爱情,慌忙热情地吻她。幸福的爱情带来了生意的兴隆。皮埃特罗·克列斯比的店铺已经占了几乎整整一条街道,变成了幻想的温室--这里可以看到精确复制的佛罗伦萨钟楼上的自鸣钟,它用乐曲报告时刻;索伦托的八音盒和中国的扑粉盒,此种扑粉盒一开盖子,就会奏出五个音符的曲子;此外还有各种难以想象的乐器和自动玩具。他把商店交给弟弟布兽诺·克列斯比经管,因为他需要有充分的时间照顾音乐学校。由于他的经营,各种玩物令人目眩的上耳其人街变成了一个仙境,人们一到这里就忘掉了阿卡蒂奥的专横暴戾,忘掉了战争的噩梦。根据乌苏娜的嘱咐,星期日的弥撒恢复以后,皮埃特罗·克列斯比送给教堂一架德国风琴,组织了一个儿童合唱队,并且教他们练会格里戈里的圣歌--这给尼康诺神父简单的礼拜仪式增添了一些光彩。大家相信,阿玛兰塔跟这意大利人结婚是会幸福的。他俩并不催促自己的感情,而让感情平稳、自然地发展,终于到了只待确定婚期的地步。他俩没有遇到任何阻碍。乌苏娜心中谴责自己的是,一再拖延婚期曾把雷贝卡的生活搞得很不象样,所以她就不想再增加良心的不安了。由于战争的灾难、奥雷连诺的出走、阿卡蒂奥的暴虐、霍·阿卡蒂奥和雷贝卡的被逐,雷麦黛丝的丧事就给放到了次要地位。皮埃特罗·克列斯比相信婚礼非举行不可,甚至暗示要把奥雷连诺·霍塞认做自己的大儿子,因为他对这个孩子充满了父爱。一切都使人想到,阿玛兰塔已经游近了宁静的海湾,就要过美满幸福的生活了。但她跟雷贝卡相反,没有表现一点急躁。犹如绣制桌布的图案、缝制精美的金银花边、刺绣孔雀那样,她平静地等待皮埃特罗·克列斯比再也无法忍受的内心煎熬。这种时刻跟十月的暴雨一块儿来临了。皮埃特罗·克列斯比从阿玛兰塔膝上拿开刺绣篮于,双手握住她的一只手。“我不能再等了,”他说。“咱们下个月结婚吧。”接触他那冰凉的手,她甚至没有颤栗一下。她象一只不驯服的小野兽,缩回手来,重新干活。

“别天真了,克列斯比,”阿玛兰塔微笑着说。“我死也不会嫁给你。”

皮埃特罗·克列斯比失去了自制。他毫不害臊地哭了起来,在绝望中差点儿扭断了手指,可是无法动摇她的决心。“别白费时间了,”阿玛兰塔回答他。“如果你真的那么爱我,你就不要再跨过这座房子的门坎。”乌苏娜羞愧得无地自容。皮埃特罗·克列斯比说尽了哀求的话。他卑屈到了不可思议的地步。整个下午,他都在乌苏娜怀里痛哭流涕,乌苏娜宁愿掏出心来安慰他。雨天的晚上,他总撑着一把绸伞在房子周围徘徊,观望阿玛兰塔窗子里有没有灯光。皮埃特罗·克列斯比从来不象这几天穿得那么讲究。他虽象个落难的皇帝,但头饰还是挺有气派的。见到阿玛兰塔的女友--常在长廊上绣花的那些女人,他就恳求她们设法让她回心转意。他抛弃了自己的一切事情,整天整天地呆在商店后面的房间里,写出一封封发狂的信,夹进一些花瓣和蝴蝶标本,寄给阿玛兰塔;她根本没有拆阅就把一封封信原壁退回。他把自己关在屋子里弹齐特拉琴,一弹就是几个小时。有一天夜里,他唱起歌来,马孔多的人闻声惊醒,被齐特拉琴神奇的乐曲声迷住了,因为这种乐曲声不可能是这个世界上的;他们也给充满爱情的歌声迷住了,因为比这更强烈的爱情在人世间是不可能想象的。然而,皮埃特罗·克列斯比看见了全镇各个窗户的灯光,只是没有看兄阿玛兰塔窗子里的灯光。十一月二日,万灵节那一夭,他的弟弟打开店门,发现所有的灯都是亮着的,所有的八音盒都奏着乐曲,所有的钟都在没完没了地报告时刻;在这乱七八槽的交响乐中,他发现皮埃特罗·克列斯比伏在爪屋的写字台上--他手腕上的静脉已给刀子割断,两只手都放在盛满安息香树胶的盟洗盆中。

乌苏娜吩咐把灵枢放在她的家里,尼康诺神父既反对为自杀者举行宗教仪式,也反对把人埋在圣地。乌苏娜跟神父争论起来。“这个人成了圣徒,”她说。“这是怎么一回事,你我都不了解。不管你想咋办,我都要把他埋在梅尔加德斯旁边。”举行了隆重的葬礼之后,在全镇的人一致同意下,她就那样做了。阿玛兰塔没有走出卧室。她从自己的床铺上,听到了乌苏娜的号啕声、人们的脚步声和低低的谈话声,以及哭灵女人的数落声,然后是一片深沉的寂静,寂静中充满了踩烂的花朵的气味。在颇长一段时间里。阿玛兰塔每到晚上都还感到薰衣草的味儿,但她竭力不让自己精神错乱。乌苏娜不理睬她了。那天傍晚,阿玛兰塔走进厨房,把一只手放在炉灶的炭火上,过了一会儿,她感到的已经不只是疼痛,而是烧焦的肉发出的臭味了,这时,乌苏娜连眼睛都不扬一扬,一点也不怜悯女儿。这是对付良心不安的人最激烈的办法。一连几天,阿玛兰塔都在家中把手放在一只盛着蛋清的盆子里,的伤就逐渐痊愈了,而且在蛋清的良好作用下,她心灵的创伤也好了。这场悲剧留下的唯一痕迹,是缠在她那的伤的手上的黑色绷带,她至死都是把它缠在手上的。

阿卡蒂奥表现了意外的宽厚态度,发布了正式哀悼皮埃特罗·克列斯比的命令。乌苏娜认为这是浪子回头的举动,但她想错了。她失去了他,根本不是从他穿上军服时开始的,而是老早开始的,她认为,她把他当做自己的孙子抚养成人,就象养育雷贝卡一样,既没优待他,也没亏待他。然而,阿卡蒂奥却长成了个乖僻、胆怯的孩子,因为在他童年的时候,正好失眠症广泛流行,乌苏娜大兴土木,霍·阿·布恩蒂亚精神错乱,奥雷连诺遁居家门,阿玛兰塔和雷贝卡彼此仇视。奥雷连诺教他读书写字时,仿佛对待一个陌生人似的,他心中所想的完全是另一码事。他拿自己的衣服给阿卡蒂奥(让维希塔香加以修改),因为这些衣服准备扔掉了。阿卡蒂奥感到苦恼的是一双不合脚的大鞋、裤子上的补丁以及女人的屁股。他跟维希塔香和卡塔乌尔谈话时,多半是用他们的语言。唯一真正关心他的人是梅尔加德斯:这老头儿把令人不解的笔记念给他听,教他照相术。谁也没有猜到,他在大家面前如何掩饰自己的痛苦,如何哀悼老头儿的去世;他翻阅老头儿的笔记,拼命寻找使这吉卜赛人复活的办法,但是毫无结果。在学校里,他受到大家的尊敬;掌握市镇大权以后,他穿上神气的军服,发布严厉的命令,他那经常落落寡欢的感觉才消失了。有天晚上在卡塔林诺游艺场里,有人大胆地向他说:“你配不上你现在的这个姓。”出乎大家的预料,阿卡蒂奥没有枪毙这个鲁莽的人。

“我不是布恩蒂亚家的人,”他说,“那倒荣幸得很。”

了解他那出身秘密的人听了这个回答,以为他一切都明白了,其实他永远都不知道谁是他的父母。象霍·阿卡蒂奥和奥雷连诺一样,他对自己的母亲皮拉·苔列娜感到一种不可遏止的欲望:当她走进他正在修饰照相底版的暗室时,他那血管里的热血竟然沸腾起来。尽管皮拉·苔列娜已经失去魅力,已经没有朗朗的笑声,他还是寻烟的苦味找到她。战前不久,有一天中午,比往常稍迟一些,她到学校里去找自己的小儿子。阿卡蒂奥在房间里等候她--平常他都在这儿睡午觉,后来他命令把这儿变成把拘留室。孩子在院子里玩耍,他却躺在吊床上急躁得发颤,因他知道皮拉·苔列娜准会经过这个房间。她来了。阿卡蒂奥一把抓住她的手,试图把她拉上吊床。“我不能,我不能,”皮拉·苔列娜惊恐地说。“你不知道,我多想让你快活,可是上帝作证,我不能。”阿卡蒂奥用他祖传的膂力拦腰把她抱住,一接触她的身体,他的两眼都开始模糊了,“别装圣女啦,”他说。“大家都知道你是个婊子。”皮拉·苔列娜竭力忍受悲惨的命运在她身上引起的厌恶。

“孩子们会看见的,”她低声说。“今儿晚上你最好不要闩上房门。”

夜里,他在吊床上等她,火烧火燎地急得直颤。他没合眼,仔细倾听蟋蟀不住地鸣叫,而且麻鹬象时刻表那样准时地叫了起来,他越来越相信自己受骗了。他的渴望刚要变成愤怒的当儿,房门忽然打开。几个月以后,站在行刑队面前的时候,阿卡蒂奥将会忆起这些时刻:他首先听到的是邻室黑暗中摸摸索索的脚步声,有人撞到凳子的磕绊声,然后漆黑里出现了一个人影,此人怦怦直跳的心脏把空气都给震动了。他伸出一只手去,碰到了另一只手,这只手的一个指头上戴着两只戒指。他伸手抓住那一只手正是时候,要不然,那一只手又会给黑暗吞没了。他感到了对方手上的筋脉和脉搏的猛烈跳动,觉得这个手掌是湿漉漉的,在大拇指的根部,生命线被一条歪斜的死亡线切断了。他这才明白,这并不是他等待的女人,因为她身上发出的不是烟的苦昧,而是花儿的芳香,她有丰满的胸脯和男人一样扁扁的乳头。她的温存有点儿手忙脚乱,她的兴奋显得缺乏经验。她是个处女,有一个完全不可思议的名字--圣索菲娅·德拉佩德。皮拉·苔列娜拿自己的一半积蓄--五十比索给了她,让她来干现在所干的事儿。阿卡蒂奥不止一次看见这个姑娘在食品店里帮助自己的父母,但是从来没有注意过她,因为她有一种罕见的本领:除非碰上机会,否则你是找不到她的。可是从这一夜起,她就象只小猫似的蜷缩在他那暖和的腋下了。她得到父母的同意,经常在午睡时到学校里来,因为皮拉·苔列娜把自己的另一半积蓄给了她的父母。后来,政府军把阿卡蒂奥和圣索菲娅·德拉佩德撵出学校,他俩就在店铺后屋的黄油罐头和玉米袋子之间幽会了。到阿卡蒂奥担任市镇军政长官的时候,他俩有了一个女儿。

知道这件事情的亲戚只有霍·阿卡蒂奥和雷贝卡,这时,阿卡蒂奥是跟他俩保持着密切关系的,这种关系的基础与其说是亲人的感情,不如说是共同的利益。霍·阿卡蒂奥被家庭的重担压得弯着脖子。雷贝卡的坚强性格,她那不知满足的情欲,她那顽固的虚荣心,遏制了丈大桀骜不驯的脾气--他从一个懒汉和色鬼变成了一头力气挺大的、干活的牲口。他俩家里一片整洁。每天早晨,雷贝卡都把窗子完全敞开,风儿从墓地吹进房间,通过房门刮到院里,在墙上和家具上都留下薄薄一层灰尘。吃土的欲望,父母骸骨的声响,她的急不可耐和皮埃特罗·克列斯比的消极等待,--所有这些都给抛到脑后了。雷贝卡整天都在窗前绣花,毫不忧虑战争,直到食厨里的瓶瓶罐罐开始震动的时候,她才站起身来做午饭;然后出现了满身污泥的几条猎狗,它们后面是一个拿着双筒枪、穿着马靴的大汉;有时,他肩上是一只鹿,但他经常拎回来的是一串野兔或野鸭。阿卡蒂奥开始掌权的时候,有一天下午突然前来看望雷贝卡和她丈夫。自从他俩离家之后,阿卡蒂奥就没有跟他俩见过面,但他显得那么友好、亲密,他们就请他尝尝烤肉。

开始喝咖啡时,阿卡蒂奥才说出自己来访的真正目的:他接到了别人对霍·阿卡蒂奥的控告。有人抱怨说,霍·阿卡蒂奥除了耕种自己的地段,还向邻接的土地扩张;他用自己的牛撞倒了别人的篱笆,毁坏了别人的棚子,强占了周围最好的耕地。那些没有遭到他掠夺的农民--他不需要他们的土地--他就向他们收税。每逢星期六,他都肩挎双筒枪,带着一群狗去强征税款。霍·阿卡蒂奥一点也不否认。他强词夺理地说,他侵占的土地是霍·阿·布恩蒂亚在马孔多建村时分配的,他能证明:他的父亲当时已经疯了,把事实上属于布恩蒂亚家的地段给了别人。这是没有必要的辩解,因为阿卡蒂奥根本不是来裁决的。他主张成立一个登记处,让霍·阿卡蒂奥侵占的土地合法化,条件是霍· 阿卡蒂奥必须让地方当局代替他收税。事情就这样商定。过了几年,奥雷连诺上校重新审查土地所有权时发现,从他哥哥家所在的山丘直到目力所及之处,包括墓地在内的全部土地都是记在他哥哥名下的,而且阿卡蒂奥在掌权的十一个月中,在自己的衣兜里不仅塞满了税款,还有他允许人家在霍·阿卡蒂奥土地上埋葬死人所收的费用。

过了几个月,乌苏娜才发现了大家都已知道的情况,因为人家不愿增加她的痛苦,是把这种情况瞒着她的。起初,她产生了怀疑。“阿卡蒂奥在给自己盖房子啦,” 她试图拿一匙南瓜粥喂到丈夫嘴里,假装骄傲地告诉他。但她忍不住叹气:“我不知道为啥,这些都不合我的意。”随后,她知道阿卡蒂奥不仅盖成了房子。甚至给自己订购了维也纳家具,她就怀疑他动用了公款。有个星期天做完弥撒回来,她看见他在新房子里跟自己的军官们玩纸牌。“你是咱们家的耻辱,”她向他叫嚷。阿卡蒂奥没有理睬她。乌苏娜这时才知道,他有一个刚满半岁的女儿,跟他非法同居的圣索菲娅·德拉佩德又怀了孕。乌苏娜决定写信给奥雷连诺上校,不管他在哪儿,把这些情况告诉他,然而随后几天事态的发展,不但阻止了她实现自己的计划,甚至使她感到后悔。对马孔多的居民来说,“战争”至今不过是一个词儿,表示一种模糊的、遥远的事情,现在成了具体的、明显的现实了。二月底,一个老妇骑着一头毛驴,驴背。上载着一些笤帚,来到马孔多镇口。她的模样是完全没有恶意的,哨兵没问什么就让她通行了,他们以为她不过是从沼泽地来的一个女商贩,老妇迳直走向兵营。阿卡蒂奥在以前的教室里接见她,这教室现在变成了后方营地:到处都可看见卷着的或者悬在铁环上的吊铺,各个角落都堆着草席,地上乱七八糟地扔着步枪、卡宾枪、甚至猎枪。老妇采取“立正”姿势,行了个军礼,然后自我介绍:

“我是格列戈里奥·史蒂文森上校。”

他带来了不好的消息。据他说,自由党人进行抵抗的最后几个据点已给消灭了。奥雷连诺上校正在一面战斗,一面撤离列奥阿察,派他带着使命来见阿卡蒂奥,说明马孔多无需抵抗就得放弃,条件是自由党人的生命财产必须得到保障。阿卡蒂奥轻蔑地打量古怪的信使,这人是不难被看成一个可怜老妇的。

“你当然带有书面指示罗,”他说。

“不,”使者回答,“我没带任何这类东西。每个人都明白,在目前情况下,身边是不能有任何招惹麻烦的东西的。”

说着,他从怀里掏出一条小金鱼来放在桌上。“我认为这就够了,”他说。阿卡蒂奥看出,这确实是奥雷连诺上校所做的小金鱼。不过,这个东西也可能是谁在战前就买去或偷去的,因此不能作为证件。为了证明自己的身份,使者甚至不惜泄露军事秘密。他说,他带着重要使命潜往库拉索岛,希望在那儿招募加勒比海岛上的流亡者,弄到足够的武器和装备,打算年底登陆。奥雷连诺上校对这个计划很有信心,所以认为目前不该作无益的牺牲。可是阿卡蒂奥十分固执,命令把使者拘押起来,弄清了此人的身份再说:而且,他誓死要保卫马孔多镇。

没等多久。自由党人失败的消息就越来越可信了。三月底的一天晚上,不合节令的雨水提前泼到马孔多街上的时候,前几个星期紧张的宁静突然被撕心裂肺的号声冲破了,接着,隆隆的炮击摧毁了教堂的钟楼。其实决定抵抗纯粹是疯狂的打算。阿卡蒂奥指挥的总共是五十个人,装备很差,每人顶多只有二十发子弹。诚然,在这些人当中有他学校里的学生,在他漂亮的号召激励之下,他们准备为了毫无希望的事情牺牲自己的性命。炮声隆隆,震天动地,只能听到零乱的射击声、靴子的践踏声、矛盾的命令声、毫无意义的号声;这时,自称史蒂文森上校的人,终于跟阿卡蒂奥谈了一次话。“别让我戴着镣铐、穿着女人的衣服可耻地死,”他说,“如果我非死不可,那就让我在战斗中死吧,”他的话说服了阿卡蒂奥。阿卡蒂奥命令自己的人给了他一支枪和二十发子弹,让他和五个人留下来保卫兵营,自己就带着参谋人员去指挥战斗。阿卡蒂奥还没走到通往沼地的路上,马孔多镇口的防栅就被摧毁了,保卫市镇的人已在街上作战,从一座房子跑到另一座房子;起初,子弹没有打完时,他们拿步枪射击,然后就用手枪对付敌人的步枪了,最后发生了白刃战。失败的危急情况迫使许多妇女都拿着棍捧和菜刀奔到街上。在一片混乱中,阿卡蒂奥看见了阿玛兰塔,她正在找他:她穿着一个睡衣,手里握着霍·阿·布恩蒂亚的两支旧式手枪,活象一个疯子。阿卡蒂奥把步枪交给一个在战斗中失掉武器的军官,带着阿玛兰塔穿过近旁的一条小街,想把她送回家去。乌苏娜不顾炮弹的呼啸,在门口等候,其中一发炮弹把邻舍的正面打穿了一个窟窿。雨停了街道滑溜溜的,好似融化的肥皂,在夜的黑暗里只能摸索前进。阿卡蒂奥把阿玛兰塔交给乌苏娜,转身就向两个敌兵射击,因为那两个敌兵正从旁边的角落里向他开火。在橱里放了多年的手枪没有打响。乌苏娜用身体挡住阿卡蒂奥,打算把他推到房子里去。“去吧,看在上帝份上,”她向他叫道。“胡闹够啦!”

敌兵向他俩瞄准。

“放开这个人,老大娘,”一个士兵吆喝,“要不,我们就不管三七二十一了!”

阿卡蒂奥推开乌苏娜,投降了。过了一阵,枪声停息,钟声响了起来。总共半小时,抵抗就被镇压下去了。阿卡蒂奥的人没有一个幸存。但在牺牲之前,他们勇敢地抗击了三百名敌兵。兵营成了他们的最后一个据点。政府军已经准备猛攻。自称格列戈里奥·史蒂文森的人,释放了囚犯,命令自己的人离开兵营,到街上去战斗。他从几个窗口射击,异常灵活,准确无误,打完了自己的二十发子弹使人觉得这个兵营是有防御力量的,于是进攻者就用大炮摧毁了它。指挥作战的上尉惊讶地发现,瓦砾堆里只有一个穿着衬裤的死人。炮弹打断的一只手还握着一支步枪,弹夹已经空了;死人的头发又密又长,好象女人的头发,用梳子别在脑后;他的脖子上挂着一根链条,链条上有条小金鱼。上尉用靴尖翻过尸体,一看死者的面孔,就惊得发呆了。“我的上帝!”他叫了一声。其他的军官走拢过来。

“你们瞧,他钻到哪儿来啦,”上尉说,“这是格列戈里奥·史蒂文森呀。”

黎明时分,根据战地军事法庭的判决,阿卡蒂奥在墓地的墙壁前面被枪决了。在一生的最后两小时里,他还没弄明白,他从童年时代起满怀的恐惧为什么消失了。他倾听他的各项罪行时是十分平静的,完全不是因为打算表现不久之前产生的勇气。他想起了乌苏娜--这时,她大概跟霍·阿·布恩蒂亚一起,正在栗树下面喝咖啡。他想起了还没取名的八个月的女儿,想起了八月间就要出生的孩子。他想起了圣索菲娅·德拉佩德,想起了昨天晚上他出来打仗时,她为了第二天的午餐而把鹿肉腌起来的情景,他记起了她那披到两肩的头发和又浓又长的睫毛,那样的睫毛仿佛是人造的。他怀念亲人时并没有感伤情绪,只是严峻地总结了自己的一生,开始明白自己实际上多么喜爱自己最憎恨的人。法庭庭长作出最后判决时,阿卡蒂奥还没发现两个小时已经过去了。“即使列举的罪行没有充分的罪证,”庭长说,“但是根据被告不负责任地把自己的部下推向毫无意义的死亡的鲁莽行为,已经足以判决被告的死刑。”在炮火毁掉的学校里,他曾第一次有过掌权以后的安全感,而在离这儿几米远的一个房间里,他也曾模糊地尝到过爱情的滋味,所以他觉得这一套死亡的程序太可笑了。其实,对他来说,死亡是没有意义的,生命才是重要的。因此,听到判决之后,他感到的不是恐惧,而是留恋。他一句话没说,直到庭长问他还有什么最后的要求。

“请告诉我老婆,”他用响亮的声音回答。“让她把女儿取名叫乌苏娜,”停了停又说:“象祖母一样叫做乌苏娜。也请告诉她,如果将要出生的是个男孩,就管他叫霍·阿卡蒂奥,但这不是为了尊敬我的大伯,而是为了尊敬我的祖父。”

在阿卡蒂奥给带到墙边之前,尼康诺神父打算让他忏悔。“我没有什么忏悔的,”阿卡蒂奥说,然后喝了一杯黑咖啡,就听凭行刑队处置了。行刑队长是个“立即执行”的专家,他的名字并不偶然,叫做罗克·卡尼瑟洛上尉,意思就是“屠夫”。毛毛丽不停地下了起来,阿卡蒂奥走向墓地的时候,望见天际出现了星期二灿烂的晨光。他的留恋也随着夜雾消散了,留下的是无限的好奇。行刑队命令他背向墙壁站立时,他才发现了雷贝卡--她满头湿发,穿一件带有粉红色小花朵的衣服,正把窗子打开。他竭力引起她的注意。的确,雷贝卡突然朝墙壁这边瞥了一眼,就惊恐得愣住了,然后勉强向他招手告别。阿卡蒂奥也向她挥了挥手。在这片刻间,几支步枪黑乎乎的枪口瞄准了他,接着,他听到了梅尔加德斯一字一句朗诵的教皇通谕,听到了小姑娘圣索菲娅·德拉佩德在教室里摸索的脚步声,感到自己的鼻子冰冷、发硬,就象他曾觉得惊异的雷麦黛丝尸体的鼻子。“嗨,他妈的,”他还来得及想了一下,“我忘了说,如果生下的


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 exterminated 26d6c11b25ea1007021683e86730eb44     
v.消灭,根绝( exterminate的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • It was exterminated root and branch. 它被彻底剪除了。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  • The insects can be exterminated by spraying DDT. 可以用喷撒滴滴涕的方法大量杀死这种昆虫。 来自《用法词典》
2 ambushes 646eb39209edae54797bdf38636f5b2d     
n.埋伏( ambush的名词复数 );伏击;埋伏着的人;设埋伏点v.埋伏( ambush的第三人称单数 );埋伏着
参考例句:
  • He was a specialist in ambushes, he said, and explained his tactics. 他说自己是埋伏战斗方面的专家,并讲述了他的战术。 来自互联网
  • It makes ambushes rather fun. 它使得埋伏战术非常有趣。 来自互联网
3 squad 4G1zq     
n.班,小队,小团体;vt.把…编成班或小组
参考例句:
  • The squad leader ordered the men to mark time.班长命令战士们原地踏步。
  • A squad is the smallest unit in an army.班是军队的最小构成单位。
4 jurisdiction La8zP     
n.司法权,审判权,管辖权,控制权
参考例句:
  • It doesn't lie within my jurisdiction to set you free.我无权将你释放。
  • Changzhou is under the jurisdiction of Jiangsu Province.常州隶属江苏省。
5 interpretation P5jxQ     
n.解释,说明,描述;艺术处理
参考例句:
  • His statement admits of one interpretation only.他的话只有一种解释。
  • Analysis and interpretation is a very personal thing.分析与说明是个很主观的事情。
6 buckled qxfz0h     
a. 有带扣的
参考例句:
  • She buckled her belt. 她扣上了腰带。
  • The accident buckled the wheel of my bicycle. 我自行车的轮子在事故中弄弯了。
7 tassels a9e64ad39d545bfcfdae60b76be7b35f     
n.穗( tassel的名词复数 );流苏状物;(植物的)穗;玉蜀黍的穗状雄花v.抽穗, (玉米)长穗须( tassel的第三人称单数 );使抽穗, (为了使作物茁壮生长)摘去穗状雄花;用流苏装饰
参考例句:
  • Tassels and Trimmings, Pillows, Wall Hangings, Table Runners, Bell. 采购产品垂饰,枕头,壁挂,表亚军,钟。 来自互联网
  • Cotton Fabrics, Embroidery and Embroiders, Silk, Silk Fabric, Pillows, Tassels and Trimmings. 采购产品棉花织物,刺绣品而且刺绣,丝,丝织物,枕头,流行和装饰品。 来自互联网
8 artillery 5vmzA     
n.(军)火炮,大炮;炮兵(部队)
参考例句:
  • This is a heavy artillery piece.这是一门重炮。
  • The artillery has more firepower than the infantry.炮兵火力比步兵大。
9 fiery ElEye     
adj.燃烧着的,火红的;暴躁的;激烈的
参考例句:
  • She has fiery red hair.她有一头火红的头发。
  • His fiery speech agitated the crowd.他热情洋溢的讲话激动了群众。
10 deception vnWzO     
n.欺骗,欺诈;骗局,诡计
参考例句:
  • He admitted conspiring to obtain property by deception.他承认曾与人合谋骗取财产。
  • He was jailed for two years for fraud and deception.他因为诈骗和欺诈入狱服刑两年。
11 unleashed unleashed     
v.把(感情、力量等)释放出来,发泄( unleash的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • The government's proposals unleashed a storm of protest in the press. 政府的提案引发了新闻界的抗议浪潮。
  • The full force of his rage was unleashed against me. 他把所有的怒气都发泄在我身上。 来自《简明英汉词典》
12 liquidated a5fc0d9146373c3cde5ba474c9ba870b     
v.清算( liquidate的过去式和过去分词 );清除(某人);清偿;变卖
参考例句:
  • All his supporters were expelled, exiled, or liquidated. 他的支持者全都被驱逐、流放或消灭了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • That can be liquidated at market value any time. 那可按市价随时得到偿付。 来自辞典例句
13 predilection 61Dz9     
n.偏好
参考例句:
  • He has a predilection for rich food.他偏好油腻的食物。
  • Charles has always had a predilection for red-haired women.查尔斯对红头发女人一直有偏爱。
14 obligatory F5lzC     
adj.强制性的,义务的,必须的
参考例句:
  • It is obligatory for us to obey the laws.我们必须守法。
  • It is obligatory on every citizen to safeguard our great motherland.保卫我们伟大的祖国是每一个公民应尽的义务。
15 sequestered 0ceab16bc48aa9b4ed97d60eeed591f8     
adj.扣押的;隐退的;幽静的;偏僻的v.使隔绝,使隔离( sequester的过去式和过去分词 );扣押
参考例句:
  • The jury is expected to be sequestered for at least two months. 陪审团渴望被隔离至少两个月。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Everything he owned was sequestered. 他的一切都被扣押了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
16 fanfare T7by6     
n.喇叭;号角之声;v.热闹地宣布
参考例句:
  • The product was launched amid much fanfare worldwide.这个产品在世界各地隆重推出。
  • A fanfare of trumpets heralded the arrival of the King.嘹亮的小号声宣告了国王驾到。
17 tightening 19aa014b47fbdfbc013e5abf18b64642     
上紧,固定,紧密
参考例句:
  • Make sure the washer is firmly seated before tightening the pipe. 旋紧水管之前,检查一下洗衣机是否已牢牢地固定在底座上了。
  • It needs tightening up a little. 它还需要再收紧些。
18 tourniquet fnYwf     
n.止血器,绞压器,驱血带
参考例句:
  • Twist the tourniquet tighter.把止血带扎紧点。
  • The tourniquet should occlude venous and lymphatic return.止血带应阻断静脉及淋巴回流。
19 rigor as0yi     
n.严酷,严格,严厉
参考例句:
  • Their analysis lacks rigor.他们的分析缺乏严谨性。||The crime will be treated with the full rigor of the law.这一罪行会严格依法审理。
20 brandishing 9a352ce6d3d7e0a224b2fc7c1cfea26c     
v.挥舞( brandish的现在分词 );炫耀
参考例句:
  • The horseman came up to Robin Hood, brandishing his sword. 那个骑士挥舞着剑,来到罗宾汉面前。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • He appeared in the lounge brandishing a knife. 他挥舞着一把小刀,出现在休息室里。 来自辞典例句
21 bastard MuSzK     
n.坏蛋,混蛋;私生子
参考例句:
  • He was never concerned about being born a bastard.他从不介意自己是私生子。
  • There was supposed to be no way to get at the bastard.据说没有办法买通那个混蛋。
22 lash a2oxR     
v.系牢;鞭打;猛烈抨击;n.鞭打;眼睫毛
参考例句:
  • He received a lash of her hand on his cheek.他突然被她打了一记耳光。
  • With a lash of its tail the tiger leaped at her.老虎把尾巴一甩朝她扑过来。
23 snail 8xcwS     
n.蜗牛
参考例句:
  • Snail is a small plant-eating creature with a soft body.蜗牛是一种软体草食动物。
  • Time moved at a snail's pace before the holidays.放假前的时间过得很慢。
24 previously bkzzzC     
adv.以前,先前(地)
参考例句:
  • The bicycle tyre blew out at a previously damaged point.自行车胎在以前损坏过的地方又爆开了。
  • Let me digress for a moment and explain what had happened previously.让我岔开一会儿,解释原先发生了什么。
25 scattered 7jgzKF     
adj.分散的,稀疏的;散步的;疏疏落落的
参考例句:
  • Gathering up his scattered papers,he pushed them into his case.他把散乱的文件收拾起来,塞进文件夹里。
26 untied d4a1dd1a28503840144e8098dbf9e40f     
松开,解开( untie的过去式和过去分词 ); 解除,使自由; 解决
参考例句:
  • Once untied, we common people are able to conquer nature, too. 只要团结起来,我们老百姓也能移山倒海。
  • He untied the ropes. 他解开了绳子。
27 abrogated c678645948795dc546d67f5ec1acf6f6     
废除(法律等)( abrogate的过去式和过去分词 ); 取消; 去掉; 抛开
参考例句:
  • The president abrogated an old law. 总统废除了一项旧法令。
  • This law has been abrogated. 这项法令今已取消。
28 chestnut XnJy8     
n.栗树,栗子
参考例句:
  • We have a chestnut tree in the bottom of our garden.我们的花园尽头有一棵栗树。
  • In summer we had tea outdoors,under the chestnut tree.夏天我们在室外栗树下喝茶。
29 unawareness d2ffa94eaba429a43fcd382423c7c34b     
不知觉;不察觉;不意;不留神
参考例句:
  • Perhaps that faculty of unawareness was what gave her eyes their transparency. 或许正是这种麻木不仁的本领,使她的眼睛透明见底。
30 lament u91zi     
n.悲叹,悔恨,恸哭;v.哀悼,悔恨,悲叹
参考例句:
  • Her face showed lament.她的脸上露出悲伤的样子。
  • We lament the dead.我们哀悼死者。
31 fleeting k7zyS     
adj.短暂的,飞逝的
参考例句:
  • The girls caught only a fleeting glimpse of the driver.女孩们只匆匆瞥了一眼司机。
  • Knowing the life fleeting,she set herself to enjoy if as best as she could.她知道这种日子转瞬即逝,于是让自已尽情地享受。
32 lucidity jAmxr     
n.明朗,清晰,透明
参考例句:
  • His writings were marked by an extraordinary lucidity and elegance of style.他的作品简洁明晰,文风典雅。
  • The pain had lessened in the night, but so had his lucidity.夜里他的痛苦是减轻了,但人也不那么清醒了。
33 docile s8lyp     
adj.驯服的,易控制的,容易教的
参考例句:
  • Circus monkeys are trained to be very docile and obedient.马戏团的猴子训练得服服贴贴的。
  • He is a docile and well-behaved child.他是个温顺且彬彬有礼的孩子。
34 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  • This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  • There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
35 excrement IhLzw     
n.排泄物,粪便
参考例句:
  • The cage smelled of excrement.笼子里粪臭熏人。
  • Clothing can also become contaminated with dust,feathers,and excrement.衣着则会受到微尘、羽毛和粪便的污染。
36 shovel cELzg     
n.铁锨,铲子,一铲之量;v.铲,铲出
参考例句:
  • He was working with a pick and shovel.他在用镐和铲干活。
  • He seized a shovel and set to.他拿起一把铲就干上了。
37 thongs 2de3e7e6aab22cfe40b21f071283c565     
的东西
参考例句:
  • Things ain't what they used to be. 现在情况不比从前了。
  • Things have been going badly . 事情进展得不顺利。
38 dominion FmQy1     
n.统治,管辖,支配权;领土,版图
参考例句:
  • Alexander held dominion over a vast area.亚历山大曾统治过辽阔的地域。
  • In the affluent society,the authorities are hardly forced to justify their dominion.在富裕社会里,当局几乎无需证明其统治之合理。
39 twilight gKizf     
n.暮光,黄昏;暮年,晚期,衰落时期
参考例句:
  • Twilight merged into darkness.夕阳的光辉融于黑暗中。
  • Twilight was sweet with the smell of lilac and freshly turned earth.薄暮充满紫丁香和新翻耕的泥土的香味。
40 gardenia zh6xQ     
n.栀子花
参考例句:
  • On muggy summer night,Gardenia brought about memories in the South.闷热的夏夜,栀子花带来关于南方的回忆。
  • A gardenia stands for pure,noble.栀子花是纯洁高尚的象征。
41 sonnets a9ed1ef262e5145f7cf43578fe144e00     
n.十四行诗( sonnet的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Keats' reputation as a great poet rests largely upon the odes and the later sonnets. 作为一个伟大的诗人,济慈的声誉大部分建立在他写的长诗和后期的十四行诗上。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • He referred to the manuscript circulation of the sonnets. 他谈到了十四行诗手稿的流行情况。 来自辞典例句
42 suffocated 864b9e5da183fff7aea4cfeaf29d3a2e     
(使某人)窒息而死( suffocate的过去式和过去分词 ); (将某人)闷死; 让人感觉闷热; 憋气
参考例句:
  • Many dogs have suffocated in hot cars. 许多狗在热烘烘的汽车里给闷死了。
  • I nearly suffocated when the pipe of my breathing apparatus came adrift. 呼吸器上的管子脱落时,我差点给憋死。
43 cuffs 4f67c64175ca73d89c78d4bd6a85e3ed     
n.袖口( cuff的名词复数 )v.掌打,拳打( cuff的第三人称单数 )
参考例句:
  • a collar and cuffs of white lace 带白色蕾丝花边的衣领和袖口
  • The cuffs of his shirt were fraying. 他衬衣的袖口磨破了。
44 parlor v4MzU     
n.店铺,营业室;会客室,客厅
参考例句:
  • She was lying on a small settee in the parlor.她躺在客厅的一张小长椅上。
  • Is there a pizza parlor in the neighborhood?附近有没有比萨店?
45 discreet xZezn     
adj.(言行)谨慎的;慎重的;有判断力的
参考例句:
  • He is very discreet in giving his opinions.发表意见他十分慎重。
  • It wasn't discreet of you to ring me up at the office.你打电话到我办公室真是太鲁莽了。
46 enveloping 5a761040aff524df1fe0cf8895ed619d     
v.包围,笼罩,包住( envelop的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. 那眼睛总是死死盯着你,那声音总是紧紧围着你。 来自英汉文学
  • The only barrier was a mosquito net, enveloping the entire bed. 唯一的障碍是那顶蚊帐罩住整个床。 来自辞典例句
47 delightful 6xzxT     
adj.令人高兴的,使人快乐的
参考例句:
  • We had a delightful time by the seashore last Sunday.上星期天我们在海滨玩得真痛快。
  • Peter played a delightful melody on his flute.彼得用笛子吹奏了一支欢快的曲子。
48 nostalgia p5Rzb     
n.怀乡病,留恋过去,怀旧
参考例句:
  • He might be influenced by nostalgia for his happy youth.也许是对年轻时幸福时光的怀恋影响了他。
  • I was filled with nostalgia by hearing my favourite old song.我听到这首喜爱的旧歌,心中充满了怀旧之情。
49 aroma Nvfz9     
n.香气,芬芳,芳香
参考例句:
  • The whole house was filled with the aroma of coffee.满屋子都是咖啡的香味。
  • The air was heavy with the aroma of the paddy fields.稻花飘香。
50 spoke XryyC     
n.(车轮的)辐条;轮辐;破坏某人的计划;阻挠某人的行动 v.讲,谈(speak的过去式);说;演说;从某种观点来说
参考例句:
  • They sourced the spoke nuts from our company.他们的轮辐螺帽是从我们公司获得的。
  • The spokes of a wheel are the bars that connect the outer ring to the centre.辐条是轮子上连接外圈与中心的条棒。
51 grandeur hejz9     
n.伟大,崇高,宏伟,庄严,豪华
参考例句:
  • The grandeur of the Great Wall is unmatched.长城的壮观是独一无二的。
  • These ruins sufficiently attest the former grandeur of the place.这些遗迹充分证明此处昔日的宏伟。
52 rubble 8XjxP     
n.(一堆)碎石,瓦砾
参考例句:
  • After the earthquake,it took months to clean up the rubble.地震后,花了数月才清理完瓦砾。
  • After the war many cities were full of rubble.战后许多城市到处可见颓垣残壁。
53 vehement EL4zy     
adj.感情强烈的;热烈的;(人)有强烈感情的
参考例句:
  • She made a vehement attack on the government's policies.她强烈谴责政府的政策。
  • His proposal met with vehement opposition.他的倡导遭到了激烈的反对。
54 warehouse 6h7wZ     
n.仓库;vt.存入仓库
参考例句:
  • We freighted the goods to the warehouse by truck.我们用卡车把货物运到仓库。
  • The manager wants to clear off the old stocks in the warehouse.经理想把仓库里积压的存货处理掉。
55 melodic WorzFW     
adj.有旋律的,调子美妙的
参考例句:
  • His voice had a rich melodic quality.他的音色浑厚而优美。
  • He spoke with a soft husky voice in a melodic accent.他微微沙哑的声音带着一种悠扬的口音。
56 oasis p5Kz0     
n.(沙漠中的)绿洲,宜人的地方
参考例句:
  • They stopped for the night at an oasis.他们在沙漠中的绿洲停下来过夜。
  • The town was an oasis of prosperity in a desert of poverty.该镇是贫穷荒漠中的一块繁荣的“绿洲”。
57 revival UWixU     
n.复兴,复苏,(精力、活力等的)重振
参考例句:
  • The period saw a great revival in the wine trade.这一时期葡萄酒业出现了很大的复苏。
  • He claimed the housing market was showing signs of a revival.他指出房地产市场正出现复苏的迹象。
58 splendor hriy0     
n.光彩;壮丽,华丽;显赫,辉煌
参考例句:
  • Never in his life had he gazed on such splendor.他生平从没有见过如此辉煌壮丽的场面。
  • All the splendor in the world is not worth a good friend.人世间所有的荣华富贵不如一个好朋友。
59 rite yCmzq     
n.典礼,惯例,习俗
参考例句:
  • This festival descends from a religious rite.这个节日起源于宗教仪式。
  • Most traditional societies have transition rites at puberty.大多数传统社会都为青春期的孩子举行成人礼。
60 hearth n5by9     
n.壁炉炉床,壁炉地面
参考例句:
  • She came and sat in a chair before the hearth.她走过来,在炉子前面的椅子上坐下。
  • She comes to the hearth,and switches on the electric light there.她走到壁炉那里,打开电灯。
61 remorse lBrzo     
n.痛恨,悔恨,自责
参考例句:
  • She had no remorse about what she had said.她对所说的话不后悔。
  • He has shown no remorse for his actions.他对自己的行为没有任何悔恨之意。
62 relegated 2ddd0637a40869e0401ae326c3296bc3     
v.使降级( relegate的过去式和过去分词 );使降职;转移;把…归类
参考例句:
  • She was then relegated to the role of assistant. 随后她被降级做助手了。
  • I think that should be relegated to the garbage can of history. 我认为应该把它扔进历史的垃圾箱。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
63 brutality MSbyb     
n.野蛮的行为,残忍,野蛮
参考例句:
  • The brutality of the crime has appalled the public. 罪行之残暴使公众大为震惊。
  • a general who was infamous for his brutality 因残忍而恶名昭彰的将军
64 imminence yc5z3     
n.急迫,危急
参考例句:
  • The imminence of their exams made them work harder.考试即将来临,迫使他们更用功了。
  • He had doubt about the imminence of war.他不相信战争已迫在眉睫。
65 tablecloths abb41060c43ebc073d86c1c49f8fb98f     
n.桌布,台布( tablecloth的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Champagne corks popped, and on lace tablecloths seven-course dinners were laid. 桌上铺着带装饰图案的网织的桌布,上面是七道菜的晚餐。 来自飘(部分)
  • At the moment the cause of her concern was a pile of soiled tablecloths. 此刻她关心的事是一堆弄脏了的台布。 来自辞典例句
66 embroider 9jtz7     
v.刺绣于(布)上;给…添枝加叶,润饰
参考例句:
  • The editor would take a theme and embroider upon it with drollery.编辑会将一篇文章,以调侃式的幽默笔调加以渲染。
  • She wants to embroider a coverlet with flowers and birds.她想给床罩绣上花鸟。
67 embroidered StqztZ     
adj.绣花的
参考例句:
  • She embroidered flowers on the cushion covers. 她在这些靠垫套上绣了花。
  • She embroidered flowers on the front of the dress. 她在连衣裙的正面绣花。
68 ration CAxzc     
n.定量(pl.)给养,口粮;vt.定量供应
参考例句:
  • The country cut the bread ration last year.那个国家去年削减面包配给量。
  • We have to ration the water.我们必须限量用水。
69 exhausted 7taz4r     
adj.极其疲惫的,精疲力尽的
参考例句:
  • It was a long haul home and we arrived exhausted.搬运回家的这段路程特别长,到家时我们已筋疲力尽。
  • Jenny was exhausted by the hustle of city life.珍妮被城市生活的忙乱弄得筋疲力尽。
70 humiliation Jd3zW     
n.羞辱
参考例句:
  • He suffered the humiliation of being forced to ask for his cards.他蒙受了被迫要求辞职的羞辱。
  • He will wish to revenge his humiliation in last Season's Final.他会为在上个季度的决赛中所受的耻辱而报复的。
71 tormented b017cc8a8957c07bc6b20230800888d0     
饱受折磨的
参考例句:
  • The knowledge of his guilt tormented him. 知道了自己的罪责使他非常痛苦。
  • He had lain awake all night, tormented by jealousy. 他彻夜未眠,深受嫉妒的折磨。
72 petals f346ae24f5b5778ae3e2317a33cd8d9b     
n.花瓣( petal的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • white petals tinged with blue 略带蓝色的白花瓣
  • The petals of many flowers expand in the sunshine. 许多花瓣在阳光下开放。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
73 stupor Kqqyx     
v.昏迷;不省人事
参考例句:
  • As the whisky took effect, he gradually fell into a drunken stupor.随着威士忌酒力发作,他逐渐醉得不省人事。
  • The noise of someone banging at the door roused her from her stupor.梆梆的敲门声把她从昏迷中唤醒了。
74 consecrated consecrated     
adj.神圣的,被视为神圣的v.把…奉为神圣,给…祝圣( consecrate的过去式和过去分词 );奉献
参考例句:
  • The church was consecrated in 1853. 这座教堂于1853年祝圣。
  • They consecrated a temple to their god. 他们把庙奉献给神。 来自《简明英汉词典》
75 wailing 25fbaeeefc437dc6816eab4c6298b423     
v.哭叫,哀号( wail的现在分词 );沱
参考例句:
  • A police car raced past with its siren wailing. 一辆警车鸣着警报器飞驰而过。
  • The little girl was wailing miserably. 那小女孩难过得号啕大哭。
76 trampled 8c4f546db10d3d9e64a5bba8494912e6     
踩( trample的过去式和过去分词 ); 践踏; 无视; 侵犯
参考例句:
  • He gripped his brother's arm lest he be trampled by the mob. 他紧抓着他兄弟的胳膊,怕他让暴民踩着。
  • People were trampled underfoot in the rush for the exit. 有人在拼命涌向出口时被踩在脚下。
77 succumb CHLzp     
v.屈服,屈从;死
参考例句:
  • They will never succumb to the enemies.他们决不向敌人屈服。
  • Will business leaders succumb to these ideas?商业领袖们会被这些观点折服吗?
78 delirium 99jyh     
n. 神智昏迷,说胡话;极度兴奋
参考例句:
  • In her delirium, she had fallen to the floor several times. 她在神志不清的状态下几次摔倒在地上。
  • For the next nine months, Job was in constant delirium.接下来的九个月,约伯处于持续精神错乱的状态。
79 pestilence YlGzsG     
n.瘟疫
参考例句:
  • They were crazed by the famine and pestilence of that bitter winter.他们因那年严冬的饥饿与瘟疫而折磨得发狂。
  • A pestilence was raging in that area. 瘟疫正在那一地区流行。
80 singed dad6a30cdea7e50732a0ebeba3c4caff     
v.浅表烧焦( singe的过去式和过去分词 );(毛发)燎,烧焦尖端[边儿]
参考例句:
  • He singed his hair as he tried to light his cigarette. 他点烟时把头发给燎了。
  • The cook singed the chicken to remove the fine hairs. 厨师把鸡燎一下,以便去掉细毛。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
81 generosity Jf8zS     
n.大度,慷慨,慷慨的行为
参考例句:
  • We should match their generosity with our own.我们应该像他们一样慷慨大方。
  • We adore them for their generosity.我们钦佩他们的慷慨。
82 solitary 7FUyx     
adj.孤独的,独立的,荒凉的;n.隐士
参考例句:
  • I am rather fond of a solitary stroll in the country.我颇喜欢在乡间独自徜徉。
  • The castle rises in solitary splendour on the fringe of the desert.这座城堡巍然耸立在沙漠的边际,显得十分壮美。
83 insomnia EbFzK     
n.失眠,失眠症
参考例句:
  • Worries and tenseness can lead to insomnia.忧虑和紧张会导致失眠。
  • He is suffering from insomnia.他患失眠症。
84 utilitarian THVy9     
adj.实用的,功利的
参考例句:
  • On the utilitarian side American education has outstridden the rest of the world.在实用方面美国教育已超越世界各国。
  • A good cloth coat is more utilitarian than a fur one.一件优质的布外衣要比一件毛皮外衣更有用。
85 fervor sgEzr     
n.热诚;热心;炽热
参考例句:
  • They were concerned only with their own religious fervor.他们只关心自己的宗教热诚。
  • The speech aroused nationalist fervor.这个演讲喚起了民族主义热情。
86 rivalry tXExd     
n.竞争,竞赛,对抗
参考例句:
  • The quarrel originated in rivalry between the two families.这次争吵是两家不和引起的。
  • He had a lot of rivalry with his brothers and sisters.他和兄弟姐妹间经常较劲。
87 daguerreotype Iywx1     
n.银板照相
参考例句:
  • The inventor of the daguerreotype is a French artist.银版照相的发明者是位法国艺术家。
  • The image was taken by louis daguerre who invented the daguerreotype-one of the earliest methods of photography.这张照片是由路易斯达盖尔拍摄,他发明了银版照相法-摄影的最早方法之一。
88 irresistible n4CxX     
adj.非常诱人的,无法拒绝的,无法抗拒的
参考例句:
  • The wheel of history rolls forward with an irresistible force.历史车轮滚滚向前,势不可挡。
  • She saw an irresistible skirt in the store window.她看见商店的橱窗里有一条叫人着迷的裙子。
89 obsession eIdxt     
n.困扰,无法摆脱的思想(或情感)
参考例句:
  • I was suffering from obsession that my career would be ended.那时的我陷入了我的事业有可能就此终止的困扰当中。
  • She would try to forget her obsession with Christopher.她会努力忘记对克里斯托弗的迷恋。
90 siesta Urayw     
n.午睡
参考例句:
  • Lots of people were taking a short siesta in the shade.午后很多人在阴凉处小睡。
  • He had acquired the knack of snatching his siesta in the most unfavourable circumstance.他学会了在最喧闹的场合下抓紧时间睡觉的诀窍。
91 hereditary fQJzF     
adj.遗传的,遗传性的,可继承的,世袭的
参考例句:
  • The Queen of England is a hereditary ruler.英国女王是世袭的统治者。
  • In men,hair loss is hereditary.男性脱发属于遗传。
92 miserable g18yk     
adj.悲惨的,痛苦的;可怜的,糟糕的
参考例句:
  • It was miserable of you to make fun of him.你取笑他,这是可耻的。
  • Her past life was miserable.她过去的生活很苦。
93 marital SBixg     
adj.婚姻的,夫妻的
参考例句:
  • Her son had no marital problems.她的儿子没有婚姻问题。
  • I regret getting involved with my daughter's marital problems;all its done is to bring trouble about my ears.我后悔干涉我女儿的婚姻问题, 现在我所做的一切将给我带来无穷的烦恼。
94 yoke oeTzRa     
n.轭;支配;v.给...上轭,连接,使成配偶
参考例句:
  • An ass and an ox,fastened to the same yoke,were drawing a wagon.驴子和公牛一起套在轭上拉车。
  • The defeated army passed under the yoke.败军在轭门下通过。
95 voracity JhbwI     
n.贪食,贪婪
参考例句:
  • Their voracity is legendary and even the most hardened warriors cannot repress a shiver if one speaks about them. 他们的贪食是传奇性的,甚至强壮的战士也会因为提起他们而无法抑制的颤抖。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • He ate with the voracity of a starving man. 他饿鬼似的贪婪地吃着。 来自互联网
96 tenacious kIXzb     
adj.顽强的,固执的,记忆力强的,粘的
参考例句:
  • We must learn from the tenacious fighting spirit of Lu Xun.我们要学习鲁迅先生韧性的战斗精神。
  • We should be tenacious of our rights.我们应坚决维护我们的权利。
97 graveyard 9rFztV     
n.坟场
参考例句:
  • All the town was drifting toward the graveyard.全镇的人都象流水似地向那坟场涌过去。
  • Living next to a graveyard would give me the creeps.居住在墓地旁边会使我毛骨悚然。
98 whitewashed 38aadbb2fa5df4fec513e682140bac04     
粉饰,美化,掩饰( whitewash的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • The wall had been whitewashed. 墙已粉过。
  • The towers are in the shape of bottle gourds and whitewashed. 塔呈圆形,状近葫芦,外敷白色。 来自汉英文学 - 现代散文
99 impatience OaOxC     
n.不耐烦,急躁
参考例句:
  • He expressed impatience at the slow rate of progress.进展缓慢,他显得不耐烦。
  • He gave a stamp of impatience.他不耐烦地跺脚。
100 attic Hv4zZ     
n.顶楼,屋顶室
参考例句:
  • Leakiness in the roof caused a damp attic.屋漏使顶楼潮湿。
  • What's to be done with all this stuff in the attic?顶楼上的材料怎么处理?
101 withdrawn eeczDJ     
vt.收回;使退出;vi.撤退,退出
参考例句:
  • Our force has been withdrawn from the danger area.我们的军队已从危险地区撤出。
  • All foreign troops should be withdrawn to their own countries.一切外国军队都应撤回本国去。
102 drawn MuXzIi     
v.拖,拉,拔出;adj.憔悴的,紧张的
参考例句:
  • All the characters in the story are drawn from life.故事中的所有人物都取材于生活。
  • Her gaze was drawn irresistibly to the scene outside.她的目光禁不住被外面的风景所吸引。
103 ceramic lUsyc     
n.制陶业,陶器,陶瓷工艺
参考例句:
  • The order for ceramic tiles has been booked in.瓷砖的订单已登记下来了。
  • Some ceramic works of art are shown in this exhibition.这次展览会上展出了一些陶瓷艺术品。
104 stew 0GTz5     
n.炖汤,焖,烦恼;v.炖汤,焖,忧虑
参考例句:
  • The stew must be boiled up before serving.炖肉必须煮熟才能上桌。
  • There's no need to get in a stew.没有必要烦恼。
105 motive GFzxz     
n.动机,目的;adv.发动的,运动的
参考例句:
  • The police could not find a motive for the murder.警察不能找到谋杀的动机。
  • He had some motive in telling this fable.他讲这寓言故事是有用意的。
106 plowing 6dcabc1c56430a06a1807a73331bd6f2     
v.耕( plow的现在分词 );犁耕;费力穿过
参考例句:
  • "There are things more important now than plowing, Sugar. "如今有比耕种更重要的事情要做呀,宝贝儿。 来自飘(部分)
  • Since his wife's death, he has been plowing a lonely furrow. 从他妻子死后,他一直过着孤独的生活。 来自辞典例句
107 despoiled 04b48f54a7b2137afbd5deb1b50eb725     
v.掠夺,抢劫( despoil的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • They despoiled the villagers of their belongings. 他们夺走了村民的财物。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The victorious army despoiled the city of all its treasures. 得胜的军队把城里的财宝劫掠一空。 来自辞典例句
108 levied 18fd33c3607bddee1446fc49dfab80c6     
征(兵)( levy的过去式和过去分词 ); 索取; 发动(战争); 征税
参考例句:
  • Taxes should be levied more on the rich than on the poor. 向富人征收的税应该比穷人的多。
  • Heavy fines were levied on motoring offenders. 违规驾车者会遭到重罚。
109 usurped ebf643e98bddc8010c4af826bcc038d3     
篡夺,霸占( usurp的过去式和过去分词 ); 盗用; 篡夺,篡权
参考例句:
  • That magazine usurped copyrighted material. 那杂志盗用了版权为他人所有的素材。
  • The expression'social engineering'has been usurped by the Utopianist without a shadow of light. “社会工程”这个词已被乌托邦主义者毫无理由地盗用了。
110 patrimony 7LuxB     
n.世袭财产,继承物
参考例句:
  • I left my parents' house,relinquished my estate and my patrimony.我离开了父母的家,放弃了我的房产和祖传财产。
  • His grandfather left the patrimony to him.他的祖父把祖传的财物留给了他。
111 cemetery ur9z7     
n.坟墓,墓地,坟场
参考例句:
  • He was buried in the cemetery.他被葬在公墓。
  • His remains were interred in the cemetery.他的遗体葬在墓地。
112 confided 724f3f12e93e38bec4dda1e47c06c3b1     
v.吐露(秘密,心事等)( confide的过去式和过去分词 );(向某人)吐露(隐私、秘密等)
参考例句:
  • She confided all her secrets to her best friend. 她向她最要好的朋友倾吐了自己所有的秘密。
  • He confided to me that he had spent five years in prison. 他私下向我透露,他蹲过五年监狱。 来自《简明英汉词典》
113 feigned Kt4zMZ     
a.假装的,不真诚的
参考例句:
  • He feigned indifference to criticism of his work. 他假装毫不在意别人批评他的作品。
  • He accepted the invitation with feigned enthusiasm. 他假装热情地接受了邀请。
114 syrup hguzup     
n.糖浆,糖水
参考例句:
  • I skimmed the foam from the boiling syrup.我撇去了煮沸糖浆上的泡沫。
  • Tinned fruit usually has a lot of syrup with it.罐头水果通常都有许多糖浆。
115 ashen JNsyS     
adj.灰的
参考例句:
  • His face was ashen and wet with sweat.他面如土色,汗如雨下。
  • Her ashen face showed how much the news had shocked her.她灰白的脸显示出那消息使她多么震惊。
116 sentries abf2b0a58d9af441f9cfde2e380ae112     
哨兵,步兵( sentry的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • We posted sentries at the gates of the camp. 我们在军营的大门口布置哨兵。
  • We were guarded by sentries against surprise attack. 我们由哨兵守卫,以免遭受突袭。
117 vendor 3izwB     
n.卖主;小贩
参考例句:
  • She looked at the vendor who cheated her the other day with distaste.她厌恶地望着那个前几天曾经欺骗过她的小贩。
  • He must inform the vendor immediately.他必须立即通知卖方。
118 roiled 0ba0e552298d089c7bb10f9d69827246     
v.搅混(液体)( roil的过去式和过去分词 );使烦恼;使不安;使生气
参考例句:
  • American society is being roiled by the controversy over homosexual marriage. 当今美国社会正被有关同性恋婚姻的争论搞得不得安宁。 来自互联网
  • In the past few months, instability has roiled Tibet and Tibetan-inhabited areas. 在过去的几个月里,西藏和藏人居住区不稳定。 来自互联网
119 stiffened de9de455736b69d3f33bb134bba74f63     
加强的
参考例句:
  • He leaned towards her and she stiffened at this invasion of her personal space. 他向她俯过身去,这种侵犯她个人空间的举动让她绷紧了身子。
  • She stiffened with fear. 她吓呆了。
120 salute rYzx4     
vi.行礼,致意,问候,放礼炮;vt.向…致意,迎接,赞扬;n.招呼,敬礼,礼炮
参考例句:
  • Merchant ships salute each other by dipping the flag.商船互相点旗致敬。
  • The Japanese women salute the people with formal bows in welcome.这些日本妇女以正式的鞠躬向人们施礼以示欢迎。
121 fugitive bhHxh     
adj.逃亡的,易逝的;n.逃犯,逃亡者
参考例句:
  • The police were able to deduce where the fugitive was hiding.警方成功地推断出那逃亡者躲藏的地方。
  • The fugitive is believed to be headed for the border.逃犯被认为在向国境线逃窜。
122 inflexible xbZz7     
adj.不可改变的,不受影响的,不屈服的
参考例句:
  • Charles was a man of settled habits and inflexible routine.查尔斯是一个恪守习惯、生活规律不容打乱的人。
  • The new plastic is completely inflexible.这种新塑料是完全不可弯曲的。
123 premature FPfxV     
adj.比预期时间早的;不成熟的,仓促的
参考例句:
  • It is yet premature to predict the possible outcome of the dialogue.预言这次对话可能有什么结果为时尚早。
  • The premature baby is doing well.那个早产的婴儿很健康。
124 abruptly iINyJ     
adv.突然地,出其不意地
参考例句:
  • He gestured abruptly for Virginia to get in the car.他粗鲁地示意弗吉尼亚上车。
  • I was abruptly notified that a half-hour speech was expected of me.我突然被通知要讲半个小时的话。
125 cannon 3T8yc     
n.大炮,火炮;飞机上的机关炮
参考例句:
  • The soldiers fired the cannon.士兵们开炮。
  • The cannon thundered in the hills.大炮在山间轰鸣。
126 cartridges 17207f2193d1e05c4c15f2938c82898d     
子弹( cartridge的名词复数 ); (打印机的)墨盒; 录音带盒; (唱机的)唱头
参考例句:
  • computer consumables such as disks and printer cartridges 如磁盘、打印机墨盒之类的电脑耗材
  • My new video game player came with three game cartridges included. 我的新电子游戏机附有三盘游戏带。
127 reigned d99f19ecce82a94e1b24a320d3629de5     
vi.当政,统治(reign的过去式形式)
参考例句:
  • Silence reigned in the hall. 全场肃静。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  • Night was deep and dead silence reigned everywhere. 夜深人静,一片死寂。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
128 contradictory VpazV     
adj.反驳的,反对的,抗辩的;n.正反对,矛盾对立
参考例句:
  • The argument is internally contradictory.论据本身自相矛盾。
  • What he said was self-contradictory.他讲话前后不符。
129 indignity 6bkzp     
n.侮辱,伤害尊严,轻蔑
参考例句:
  • For more than a year we have suffered the indignity.在一年多的时间里,我们丢尽了丑。
  • She was subjected to indignity and humiliation.她受到侮辱和羞辱。
130 barricades c0ae4401dbb9a95a57ddfb8b9765579f     
路障,障碍物( barricade的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • The police stormed the barricades the demonstrators had put up. 警察冲破了示威者筑起的街垒。
  • Others died young, in prison or on the barricades. 另一些人年轻时就死在监牢里或街垒旁。
131 defenders fe417584d64537baa7cd5e48222ccdf8     
n.防御者( defender的名词复数 );守卫者;保护者;辩护者
参考例句:
  • The defenders were outnumbered and had to give in. 抵抗者寡不敌众,只能投降。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • After hard fighting,the defenders were still masters of the city. 守军经过奋战仍然控制着城市。 来自《简明英汉词典》
132 disarmed f147d778a788fe8e4bf22a9bdb60a8ba     
v.裁军( disarm的过去式和过去分词 );使息怒
参考例句:
  • Most of the rebels were captured and disarmed. 大部分叛乱分子被俘获并解除了武装。
  • The swordsman disarmed his opponent and ran him through. 剑客缴了对手的械,并对其乱刺一气。 来自《简明英汉词典》
133 doorway 2s0xK     
n.门口,(喻)入门;门路,途径
参考例句:
  • They huddled in the shop doorway to shelter from the rain.他们挤在商店门口躲雨。
  • Mary suddenly appeared in the doorway.玛丽突然出现在门口。
134 toll LJpzo     
n.过路(桥)费;损失,伤亡人数;v.敲(钟)
参考例句:
  • The hailstone took a heavy toll of the crops in our village last night.昨晚那场冰雹损坏了我们村的庄稼。
  • The war took a heavy toll of human life.这次战争夺去了许多人的生命。
135 mobility H6rzu     
n.可动性,变动性,情感不定
参考例句:
  • The difference in regional house prices acts as an obstacle to mobility of labour.不同地区房价的差异阻碍了劳动力的流动。
  • Mobility is very important in guerrilla warfare.机动性在游击战中至关重要。
136 deserted GukzoL     
adj.荒芜的,荒废的,无人的,被遗弃的
参考例句:
  • The deserted village was filled with a deathly silence.这个荒废的村庄死一般的寂静。
  • The enemy chieftain was opposed and deserted by his followers.敌人头目众叛亲离。
137 perplexed A3Rz0     
adj.不知所措的
参考例句:
  • The farmer felt the cow,went away,returned,sorely perplexed,always afraid of being cheated.那农民摸摸那头牛,走了又回来,犹豫不决,总怕上当受骗。
  • The child was perplexed by the intricate plot of the story.这孩子被那头绪纷繁的故事弄得迷惑不解。
138 persistent BSUzg     
adj.坚持不懈的,执意的;持续的
参考例句:
  • Albert had a persistent headache that lasted for three days.艾伯特连续头痛了三天。
  • She felt embarrassed by his persistent attentions.他不时地向她大献殷勤,使她很难为情。
139 drizzle Mrdxn     
v.下毛毛雨;n.毛毛雨,蒙蒙细雨
参考例句:
  • The shower tailed off into a drizzle.阵雨越来越小,最后变成了毛毛雨。
  • Yesterday the radio forecast drizzle,and today it is indeed raining.昨天预报有小雨,今天果然下起来了。
140 virgin phPwj     
n.处女,未婚女子;adj.未经使用的;未经开发的
参考例句:
  • Have you ever been to a virgin forest?你去过原始森林吗?
  • There are vast expanses of virgin land in the remote regions.在边远地区有大片大片未开垦的土地。
141 nostrils 23a65b62ec4d8a35d85125cdb1b4410e     
鼻孔( nostril的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Her nostrils flared with anger. 她气得两个鼻孔都鼓了起来。
  • The horse dilated its nostrils. 马张大鼻孔。
142 corpse JYiz4     
n.尸体,死尸
参考例句:
  • What she saw was just an unfeeling corpse.她见到的只是一具全无感觉的尸体。
  • The corpse was preserved from decay by embalming.尸体用香料涂抹以防腐烂。
143 thighs e4741ffc827755fcb63c8b296150ab4e     
n.股,大腿( thigh的名词复数 );食用的鸡(等的)腿
参考例句:
  • He's gone to London for skin grafts on his thighs. 他去伦敦做大腿植皮手术了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The water came up to the fisherman's thighs. 水没到了渔夫的大腿。 来自《简明英汉词典》
144 bastards 19876fc50e51ba427418f884ba64c288     
私生子( bastard的名词复数 ); 坏蛋; 讨厌的事物; 麻烦事 (认为别人走运或不幸时说)家伙
参考例句:
  • Those bastards don't care a damn about the welfare of the factory! 这批狗养的,不顾大局! 来自子夜部分
  • Let the first bastards to find out be the goddam Germans. 就让那些混账的德国佬去做最先发现的倒霉鬼吧。 来自演讲部分


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