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首页 » 经典英文小说 » 百年孤独 One Hundred Years of Solitude » Chapter 12
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Chapter 12

"Look at the mess we've got ourselves into," Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía said at that time, "just because we invited a gringo to eat some bananas."
Aureli-ano Segun-do, on the other hand, could not contain his happiness over the avalanche1 foreigners. The house was suddenly filled with unknown guests, with invincible2 and worldly carousers, and it became necessary to add bedrooms off the courtyard, widen the dining room, and exchange the old table for one that held sixteen people, with new china and silver, and even then they had to eat lunch in shifts. Fernanda had to swallow her scruples3 and their guests of the worst sort like kings as they muddied the porch with their boots, urinated in the garden. laid their mats down anywhere to take their siesta4, and spoke5 without regard for the sensitivities of ladies or the proper behavior of gentlemen. Amaranta, was so scandalized with the plebeian6 invasion that she went back to eating in the kitchen as in olden days. Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía, convinced that the majority of those who came into his workshop to greet him were not doing it because of sympathy or regard but out of the curiosity to meet a historical relic7, a museum fossil, decided8 to shut himself in by barring the door and he was not seen any more except on very rare occasions when he would sit at the street door. úrsula, on the other hand, even during the days when she was already dragging her feet and walking about groping along the walls, felt a juvenile9 excitement as the time for the arrival of the train approached. "We have to prepare some meat and fish," she would order the four cooks, who hastened to have everything ready under the imperturbable10 direction of Santa Sofía de la Piedad. "We have to prepare everything," she insisted, "because we never know what these strangers like to eat." The train arrived during the hottest time of day. At lunchtime the house shook with the bustle11 of a marketplace, and the perspiring12 guests-who did not even know who their hosts were-trooped in to occupy the best places at the table, while the cooks bumped into each other with enormous kettles of soup, pots of meat, large gourds14 filled with vegetables, and troughs of rice, and passed around the contents of barrels of lemonade with inexhaustible ladles. The disorder15 was such that Fernanda was troubled by the idea that many were eating twice and on more than one occasion she was about to burst out with a vegetable hawker's insults because someone at the table in confusion asked her for the check. More than a year had gone by since Mr. Herbert's visit and the only thing that was known was that the gringos were planning to plant banana trees in the enchanted16 region that José Arcadio Buendía and his men had crossed in search of the route to the great inventions. Two other sons Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía, with the cross of ashes on their foreheads, arrived, drawn17 by that great volcanic18 belch19, and they justified20 their determination with a phrase that may have explained everybody's reasons.
"We came," they said, "because everyone is coming."
Remedios the Beauty was the only one who was immune to the banana plague. She was becalmed in a magnificent adolescence21, more and more impenetrable to formality, more and more indifferent to malice22 and suspicion, happy in her own world of simple realities. She did not understand why women complicated their lives with corsets and petticoats, so she sewed herself a coarse cassock that she simply put over her and without further difficulties resolved the problem of dress, without taking away the feeling of being naked, which according to her lights was the only decent way to be when at home. They bothered her so much to cut the rain of hair that already reached to her thighs24 and to make rolls with combs and braids with red ribbons that she simply shaved her head and used the hair to make wigs25 for the saints. The startling thing about her simplifying instinct was that the more she did away with fashion in a search for comfort and the more she passed over conventions as she obeyed spontaneity, the more disturbing her incredible beauty became and the more provocative26 she became to men. When the sons of Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía were in Macon-do for the first time, úrsula remembered that in their veins27 they bore the same blood as her great-granddaughter she shuddered29 with a forgotten fright. "Keep your eyes wide open," she warned her. "With any of them your children will come out with the tail of a pig." The girl paid such little attention to the warning that she dressed up as a man and rolled around in the sand in order to climb the greased pole, and she was at the point of bringing on a tragedy among the seventeen cousins, who were driven mad by the unbearable30 spectacle. That was why none of them slept at the house when they visited the town and the four who had stayed lived in rented rooms at úrsula's insistence31. Remedios the Beauty, however, would have died laughing if she had known about that precaution. Until her last moment on earth she was unaware32 that her irreparable fate as a disturbing woman was a daily disaster. Every time she appeared in the dining room, against úrsula's orders, she caused a panic of exasperation33 among the outsiders. It was all too evident that she was completely naked underneath34 her crude nightshirt and no one could understand that her shaved perfect skull35 was not some kind of challenge, and that the boldness with which she uncovered her thighs to cool off was not a criminal provocation36, nor was her pleasure when she sucked her fingers after. eating. What no member of the family ever knew was that the strangers did not take long to realize that Remedios the Beauty gave off a breath of perturbation, a tormenting38 breeze that was still perceptible several hours after she had passed by. Men expert in the disturbances39 of love, experienced all over the world, stated that they had never suffered an anxiety similar to the one produced by the natural smell of Remedios the Beauty. On the porch the begonias, in the parlor40, in any place in the house, it was possible to point out the exact place where she had been and the time that had passed since she had left it. It was a definite, unmistakable trace that no one in the family could distinguish because it had been incorporated into the daily odors for a long time, but it was one that the outsiders identified immediately. They were the only ones, therefore, who understood how the young commander of the guard had died of love and how a gentleman from a faraway lhad been plunged41 into desperation. Unaware of the restless circle in which she moved, of the unbearable state intimate calamity42 that she provoked as she passed by, Remedios the Beauty treated the men without the least bit malice and in the end upset them with her innocent complaisance43. When úrsula succeeded in imposing44 the commthat she eat with Amaranta in the kitchen so that the outsiders would not see her, she felt more comfortable, because, after all, she was beyond all discipline. In reality, it made no difference to her where she ate, and not at regular hours but according to the whims45 appetite. Sometimes she would get up to have lunch at three in the morning, sleep all day long, and she spent several months with her timetable all in disarray46 until some casual incident would bring her back into the order things. When things were going better she would get up at eleven o'clock in the morning and shut herself up until two o'clock, completely nude47, in the bathroom, killing48 scorpions49 as she came out of her dense50 prolonged sleep. Then she would throw water from the cistern51 over herself with a gourd13. It was an act so prolonged, so meticulous52, so rich in ceremonial aspects that one who did not know well would have thought that she was given over to the deserved adoration53 of her own body. For her, however, that solitary54 rite55 lacked all sensuality and was simply a way of passing the time until she was hungry. One day, as she began to bathe herself, a stranger lifted a tile from the roof and was breathless at the tremendous spectacle of her nudity. She saw his desolate56 eyes through the broken tiles and had no reaction of shame but rather one of alarm.

"I just wanted to see you," the foreigner murmured.
"Oh, all right," she said. "But be careful, those tiles are rotten."
The stranger's face had a pained expression of stupor57 and he seemed to be battling silently against his primary instincts so as not to break up the mirage58. Remedios the Beauty thought that he was suffering from the fear that the tiles would break and she bathed herself more quickly than usual so that the man would not be in danger. While she was pouring water from the, cistern she told him that the roof was in that state because she thought that the bed of leaves had been rotted by the rain and that was what was filling the bathroom with scorpions. The stranger thought that her small talk was a way of covering her complaisance, so that when she began to soap herself he gave into temptation went a step further.
"Let me soap you," he murmured.
"Thank you for your good intentions," she said, "but my two hands are quite enough."
"Even if it's just your back," the foreigner begged.
"That would be silly," she said. "People never soap their backs."
Then, while she was drying herself, the stranger begged her, with his eyes full of tears, to marry him. She answered him sincerely that she would never marry a man who was so simple that he had wasted almost an hour and even went without lunch just to see a woman taking a bath. Finally, when she put on her cassock, the man could not bear the proof that, indeed, she was not wearing anything underneath, as everyone had suspected, and he felt himself marked forever with the white-hot iron of that secret. Then he took two more tiles off in order to drop down into the bathroom.
"It's very high," she warned him in fright. "You'll kill yourself!"
The rotten tiles broke with a noise of disaster and the man barely had time to let out a cry of terror as he cracked his skull and was killed outright59 on the cement floor. The foreigners who heard the noise in the dining room and hastened to remove the body noticed the suffocating60 odor of Remedios the Beauty on his skin. It was so deep in his body that the cracks in his skull did not give off blood but an amber-colored oil that was impregnated with that secret perfume, and then they understood that the smell of Remedios the Beauty kept on torturing men beyond death, right down to the dust of their bones. Nevertheless, they did not relate that horrible accident to the other two men who had died because of Remedios the Beauty. A victim was still needed before the outsiders and many of the old inhabitants of Macon-do would credit the legend that Remedios Buendía did not give off a breath of love but a fatal emanation. The occasion for the proof of it came some months later on one afternoon when Remedios the Beauty went with a group of girl friends to look at the new plantings. For the girls of Macon-do that novel game was reason for laughter and surprises, frights and jokes, at night they would talk about their walk as if it had been an experience in a dream. Such was the prestige of that silence that úrsula did not have the heart to take the fun away from Remedios the Beauty, and she let her go one afternoon, providing that she wore a hat and a decent dress. As soon as the group of friends went into the plantings the air became impregnated with a fatal fragrance61. The men who were working along the rows felt possessed62 by a strange fascination63, menaced by some invisible danger, and many succumbed64 to a terrible desire to weep. Remedios the Beauty and her startled friends managed to take refuge in a nearby house just as they were about to be assaulted by a pack of ferocious65 males. A short time later they were rescued by the flour Aureli-anos, whose crosses of ash inspired a sacred respect, as if they were caste marks, stamps of invulnerability. Remedios the Beauty did not tell anyone that one of the men, taking advantage of the tumult66, had managed to attack her stomach with a hand that was more like the claw of an eagle clinging to the edge a precipice67. She faced the attacker in a kind of instantaneous flash and saw the disconsolate68 eyes, which remained stamped on her heart like the hot coals of pity. That night the man boasted of his audacity69 and swaggered over his good luck on the Street of the Turks a few minutes before the kick of a horse crushed his chest and a crowd of outsiders saw him die in the middle of the street, drowned in his own bloody70 vomiting71.
The supposition that Remedios the Beauty Possessed powers of death was then borne out by four irrefutable events. Although some men who were easy with their words said that it was worth sacrificing one's life for a night of love with such an arousing woman, the truth was that no one made any effort to do so. Perhaps, not only to attain72 her but also to conjure73 away her dangers, all that was needed was a feeling as primitive74 and as simple as that of love, but that was the only thing that did not occur to anyone. úrsula did not worry about her any more. On another occasion, when she had not yet given up the idea of saving her for the world, she had tried to get her interested in basic domestic affairs. "Men demand much more than you think," she would tell her enigmatically. "There's a lot of cooking, a lot of sweeping75, a lot of suffering over little things beyond what you think." She was deceiving herself within, trying to train her for domestic happiness because she was convinced that once his passion was satisfied them would not be a man on the face of the earth capable of tolerating even for a day a negligence76 that was beyond all understanding. The birth of the latest José Arcadio and her unshakable will to bring up to be Pope finally caused her to cease worrying about her great--granddaughter. She abandoned her to her fate, trusting that sooner or later a miracle would take place that in this world of everything there would also be a man -with enough sloth77 to put up with her. For a long time already Amaranta had given up trying to make her into a useful woman. Since those forgotten afternoons when her niece barely had enough interest to turn the crank on the sewing machine, she had reached the conclusion that she was simpleminded. "Were going to have to raffle78 you off," she would tell her, perplexed79 at the fact that men's words would not penetrate80 her. Later on, when úrsula insisted that Remedios the Beauty go to mass with her face covered with a shawl, Amaranta thought that a mysterious recourse like that would turn out to be so provoking that soon a man would come who would be intrigued81 enough to search out patiently for the weak point of her heart. But when she saw the stupid way in which she rejected a pretender who for many reasons was more desirable than a prince, she gave up all hope. Fernanda did not even make any attempt to understand her. When she saw Remedios the Beauty dressed as a queen at the bloody carnival82 she thought that she was an extraordinary creature. But when she saw her eating with her hands, incapable83 of giving an answer that was not a miracle of simplemindedness, the only thing that she lamented84 was the fact that the idiots in the family lived so long. In spite the fact that Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía kept on believing and repeating that Remedios the Beauty was in reality the most lucid85 being that he had ever known and that she showed it at every moment with her startling ability to put things over on everyone, they let her go her own way. Remedios the Beauty stayed there wandering- through the desert of solitude86, bearing no cross on her back, maturing in her dreams without nightmares, her interminable baths, her unscheduled meals, her deep and prolonged silences that had no memory until one afternoon in March, when Fernanda wanted to fold her brabant sheets in the garden and asked the women in the house for help. She had just begun when Amaranta noticed that Remedios the Beauty was covered all over by an intense paleness.
"Don't you feel well?" she asked her.
"Quite the opposite," she said, "I never felt better."
The outsiders, of course, thought that Remedios the Beauty had finally succumbed to her irrevocable fate of a queen bee and that her family was trying to save her honor with that tale of levitation87. Fernanda, burning with envy, finally accepted the miracle, for a long time she kept on praying to God to send her back her sheets. Most people believed in the miracle and they even lighted candles and celebrated88 novenas. Perhaps there might have been talk of nothing else for a long time if the barbarous extermination89 of the Aureli-anos had not replaced amazement90 with honor. Although he had never thought of it as an omen23, Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía had foreseen the tragic91 end of his sons in a certain way. When Aureli-ano Serrador and Aureli-ano Arcaya, the two who arrived during the tumult, expressed a wish to stay in Macon-do, their father tried to dissuade92 them. He could not understand what they were going to do in a town that had been transformed into a dangerous place overnight. But Aureli-ano Centeno and Aureli-ano Triste, backed by Aureli-ano Segun-do. gave them work in their businesses. Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía had reasons that were still very confused and were against that determination. When he saw Mr. Brown in the first automobile93 to reach Macon-do-an orange convertible94 with a horn that frightened dogs with its bark--the old soldier grew indignant with the servile excitement of the people and he realized that something had changed in the makeup95 of the men since the days when they would leave their wives and children and toss a shotgun on their shoulders to go off to war. The local authorities, after the armistice96 of Neerlandia, were mayors without initiative, decorative97 judges picked from among the peaceful and tired Conservatives of Macon-do. "This is a regime wretches," Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía would comment when he saw the barefoot policemen armed with wooden clubs pass. "We fought all those wars and all of it just so that we didn't have to paint our houses blue." When the banana company arrived, however, the local functionaries98 were replaced by dictatorial99 foreigners whom Mr. Brown brought to live in the electrified100 chicken yard so that they could enjoy, as he explained it, the dignity that their status warranted so that they would not suffer from the heat and the mosquitoes and the countless101 discomforts102 and privations of the town. The old policemen were replaced by hired assassins machetes. Shut up in his workshop, Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía thought about those changes and for the first time in his quiet years solitude he was tormented103 by the definite certainty that it had been a mistake not to have continued the war to its final conclusion. During that time a brother of the forgotten Colonel Magnífico Visbal was taking his seven-year-old grandson to get a soft drink at one of the pushcarts104 on the square and because the child accidentally bumped into a corporal of police and spilled the drink on his uniform, the barbarian105 cut him to pieces with his machete, and with one stroke he cut off the head of the grandfather as he tried to stop him. The whole town saw the decapitated man pass by as a group of men carried him to his house, with a woman dragging the head along by its hair, and the bloody sack with the pieces of the child.
For Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía it meant the limits of atonement. He suddenly found himself suffering from the same indignation that he had felt in his youth over the body the woman who had been beaten to death because she had been bitten by a rabid dog. He looked at the groups of bystanders in front of the house his old stentorian106 voice, restored by a deep disgust with himself, he unloaded upon them the burden of hate that he could no longer bear in his heart.
"One of these days," he shouted, I'm going to arm my boys so we can get rid of these shitty gringos!"
During the course of that week, at different places along the coast, his seventeen sons were hunted down like rabbits by invisible criminals who aimed at the center of their crosses of ash. Aureli-ano Triste was leaving the house with his mother at seven in the evening when a rifle shot came out of the darkness and perforated his forehead. Aureli-ano Centeno was found in the hammock that he was accustomed to hang up in the factory with an icepick between his eyebrows108 driven in up to the handle. Aureli-ano Serrador had left his girl friend at her parents' house after having taken her to the movies and was returning through the well-lighted Street of the Turks when someone in the crowd who was never identified fired a revolver shot which knocked over into a caldron of boiling lard. A few minutes later someone knocked at the door of the room where Aureli-ano Arcaya was shut up with a woman and shouted to him: "Hurry up, they're killing your brothers." The woman who was with him said later that Aureli-ano Arcaya jumped out of bed and opened the door and was greeted with the discharge of a Mauser that split his head open. On that night of death, while the house was preparing to hold a wake for the four corpses109, Fernanda ran through the town like a madwoman looking for Aureli-ano Segun-do, whom Petra Cotes had locked up in a closet, thinking that the order of extermination included all who bore the colonel's name. She would not let him out until the fourth day, when the telegrams received from different places along the coast made it clear that the fury of the invisible enemy was directed only at the brothers marked with the crosses of ash. Amaranta fetched the ledger110 where she had written down the facts about her nephews and as the telegrams arrived she drew lines through the names until only that of the eldest111 remained. They remembered him very well because of the contrast between his dark skin and his green eyes. His name was Aureli-ano Amador and he was a carpenter, living in a village hidden in the foothills. After waiting two weeks for the telegram telling of his death, Aureli-ano Segun-do sent a messenger to him in order to warn him, thinking that he might not know about the threat that hung over him. The emissary returned with the news that Aureli-ano Amador was safe. The night the extermination two men had gone to get him at his house and had shot at him with their revolvers but they had missed the cross of ashes. Aureli-ano Amador had been able to leap over the wall of the courtyard and was lost in the labyrinth112 of the mountains, which he knew like the back of his hand thanks to the friendship he maintained with the Indians, from whom he bought wood. Nothing more was heard of him.

Those were dark days for Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía. The president of the republic sent him a telegram of condolence in which he promised an exhaustive investigation113 and paid homage114 to the dead men. At his command, the mayor appeared at the services with four funeral wreaths, which he tried to place on the coffins115, but the colonel ordered him into the street. After the burial he drew up personally submitted to the president of the republic a violent telegram, which the telegrapher refused to send. Then he enriched it terms of singular aggressiveness, put it in an envelope, and mailed it. As had happened the death of his wife, as had happened to him so many times during the war with the deaths of his best friends, he did not have a feeling of sorrow but a blind and directionless rage, a broad feeling of impotence. He even accused Father Antonio Isabel of complicity for having marked his sons with indelible ashes so that they-could be identified by their enemies. The decrepit116 priest, who could no longer string ideas together and who was beginning to startle his parishioners with the wild interpretations117 he gave from the pulpit, appeared one afternoon at the house with the goblet118 in which he had prepared the ashes that Wednesday and he tried to anoint the whole family with them to show that they could be washed off with water. But the horror of the misfortune had penetrated119 so deeply that not even Fernanda would let him experiment on her and never again was a Buendía seen to kneel at the altar rail on Ash Wednesday.
Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía did not recover his calm for a long time. He abandoned the manufacture of little fishes, ate with great difficulty, and wandered all through the house as if walking in his sleep, dragging his blanket and chewing on his quiet rage. At the end of three months his hair was ashen120, his old waxed mustache poured down beside his colorless lips, but, on the other hand, his eyes were once more the burning coals that had startled those who had seen him born that in other days had made chairs rock with a simple glance. In the fury of his torment37 he tried futilely121 to rouse the omens122 that had guided his youth along dangerous paths into the desolate wasteland of glory. He was lost, astray in a strange house where nothing and no one now stirred in him the slightest vestige123 of affection. Once he opened Melquíades' room, looking for the traces of a past from before the war, and he found only rubble124, trash, piles of waste accumulated over all the years of abandonment. Between the covers of the books that no one had ever read again, in the old parchments damaged by dampness, a livid flower had prospered125, and in the air that had been the purest and brightest in the house an unbearable smell of rotten memories floated. One morning he found úrsula weeping under the chestnut126 tree at the knees of her dead husband. Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía was the only inhabitant of the house who still did not see the powerful old man who had been beaten down by half a century in the open air. "Say hello to your father," úrsula told him. He stopped for an instant in front of the chestnut tree and once again he saw that the empty space before him did not arouse an affection either.
"He's very sad," úrsula answered, "because he thinks that you're going to die."
The omen of the, dead father stirred up the last remnant of pride that was left in his heart, but he confused it with a sudden gust107 of strength. It was for that reason that he hounded úrsula to tell him where in the courtyard the gold coins that they had found inside the plaster Saint Joseph were buried. "You'll never know," she told him with a firmness inspired by an old lesson. "One day," she added, "the owner of that fortune will appear and only he can dig it up." No one knew why a man who had always been so generous had begun to covet127 money with such anxiety, and not the modest amounts that would have been enough to resolve an emergency, but a fortune of such mad size that the mere128 mention of it left Aureli-ano Segun-do awash in amazement. His old fellow party members, to whom he went asking for help, hid so as not to receive him. It was around that time that he was heard to say. "The only difference today between Liberals and Conservatives is that the Liberals go to mass at five o'clock and the Conservatives at eight." Nevertheless he insisted with such perseverance129, begged in such a way, broke his code dignity to such a degree, that with a little help from here and a little more from there, sneaking130 about everywhere, with a slippery diligence and a pitiless perseverance, he managed to put together in eight months more money than úrsula had buried. Then he visited the ailing131 Colonel Geri-neldo Márquez so that he would help him start the total war.
At a certain time Colonel Geri-neldo Márquez was really the only one who could have pulled, even from his paralytics chair, the musty strings132 of rebellion. After the armistice of Neerlandia, while Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía took refuge with his little gold fishes, he kept in touch with the rebel officers who had been faithful to him until the defeat. With them he waged the sad war of daily humiliation133, of entreaties134 and petitions, of come-back-tomorrow, of any-time-now, of we're-studying--your-case-with-the-proper-attention; the war hopelessly lost against the many yours-most-trulys who should have signed and would never sign the lifetime pensions. The other war, the bloody one of twenty years, did not cause them as much damage as the corrosive135 war of eternal postponements. Even Colonel Geri-neldo Márquez, who escaped three attempts on his life, survived five wounds, and emerged unscathed from innumerable battles, succumbed to that atrocious siege of waiting and sank into the miserable136 defeat of old age, thinking of Amaranta among the diamond-shaped patches of light in a borrowed house. The last veterans of whom he had word had appeared photographed in a newspaper with their faces shamelessly raised beside an anonymous137 president of the republic who gave them buttons with his likeness138 on them to wear in their lapels and returned to them a flag soiled with blood and gunpowder139 so that they could place it on their coffins. The others, more honorable. were still waiting for a letter in the shadow of public charity, dying of hunger, living through rage, ratting of old age amid the exquisite140 shit of glory. So that when Colonel Aureli-ano Buendía invited him to start a mortal conflagration141 that would wipe out all vestiges142 of a regime of corruption143 and scandal backed by the foreign invader144, Colonel Geri-neldo Márquez could not hold back a shudder28 of compassion145.
"Oh, Aureli-ano," he sighed. "I already knew that you were old, but now I realize that you're a lot older than you look."

 

马孔多居民被许多奇异的发明弄得眼花缭乱,简直来不及表示惊讶。他们望着淡白的电灯,整夜都不睡觉;电机是奥雷连诺·特里斯特第二次乘火车旅行之后带回来的,——它那无休无止的嗡嗡声,要好久才能逐渐习惯。生意兴隆的商人布鲁诺·克列斯比先生,在设有狮头式售票窗口的剧院里放映的电影,搞得马孔多的观众恼火已极,因为他们为之痛哭的人物,在一部影片里死亡和埋葬了,却在另一部影片里活得挺好,而且变成了阿拉伯人。花了两分钱去跟影片人物共命运的观众,忍受不了这种空前的欺骗,把坐椅都砸得稀烂。根据布鲁诺.克列斯比先生的坚决要求,镇长在一张布告中说明:电影机只是一种放映幻象的机器,观众不应予以粗暴的对待;许多人以为自己受了吉卜赛人新把戏的害,就决定不再去看电影了,因为自己的倒霉事儿已经够多,用不着去为假人假事流泪。快活的法国艺妓带来的留声机也出现了类似的情况,此种留声机代替了过时的手风琴,使得地方乐队的收入受到了损失,最初大家好奇,前来“禁街”(指花天酒地的街道)参观的人很多,甚至传说一些高贵妇女也乔装男人,希望亲眼看看这种神秘的新鲜玩意儿,但她们就近看了半天以后认为:这并不象大家所想的和艺妓们所说的是个“魔磨”,而是安了发条的玩具,它的音乐根本不能跟乐队的音乐相比,因为乐队的音乐是动人的、有人味的,充满了生活的真实。大家对留声机深感失望,尽管它很快得到了广泛的推广,每个家庭都有一架,但毕竟不是供成年人消遣,而是给孩子们拆来拆去玩耍的。不过,镇上的什么人见到了火车站上的电话机,面对这种严峻的现实,最顽固的怀疑论者也动摇了。这种电话机有一个需要转动的长把手,因此大家最初把它看作是一种原始的留声机。上帝似乎决定试验一下马孔多居民们惊愕的限度,让他们经常处于高兴与失望、怀疑和承认的交替之中,以致没有一个人能够肯定他说现实的限度究竟在哪里。这是现实和幻想的混合,犹如栗树下面霍·阿·布恩蒂亚不安的幽灵甚至大白天也在房子里踱来踱去。铁路正式通车之后,每个星期三的十一点钟,一列火车开始准时到达,车站上建立了一座房子——一个简陋的木亭,里面有一张桌子和一台电话机,还有一个售票的小窗口;马孔多街道上出现了外来的男男女女,他们装做是从事一般买卖的普通人,但是很象杂技演员。这些沿街表演的流动杂技演员,也鼓簧弄舌地硬要别人观看啸叫的铁锅,并且传授大斋第七天拯救灵魂的摄生方法。(注:指节欲规则,节欲方法)在已经厌恶吉卜赛把戏的这个市镇上,这些杂技演员是无法指望成功的,但他们还是想尽巧招赚了不少钱,主要靠那些被他们说得厌烦的人和容易上当的人。在一个星期三,有一位笑容可掬的矮小的赫伯特先生,和这些杂技演员一块儿来到了马孔多,然后在布恩蒂亚家里吃饭。他穿着马裤,系着护腿套,戴着软木头盔和钢边眼镜;眼镜后面是黄玉似的眼睛。

赫伯特先生在桌边吃完第一串香蕉之前,谁也没有注意他。奥雷连诺第二是在雅各旅馆里偶然遇见他的,他在那儿用半通不通的西班牙语抱怨没有空房间,奥雷连诺第二就象经常对待外来人那样,把他领到家里来了。赫伯特先生有几个气球,他带着它们游历了半个世界,到处都得到极好的收入,但他未能把任何一个马孔多居民升到空中,因为他们看见过和尝试过吉卜赛人的飞毯,就觉得气球是倒退了。因此,赫伯特先生已买好了下一趟列车的车票。

一串虎纹香蕉拿上桌子的时候(这种香蕉通常是拿进饭厅供午餐用的),赫伯特先生兴致不大地掰下了第一个香蕉。接着又掰下一个,再掰下一个;他不停地一面谈,一面吃;一面咀嚼,一面品味,但没有食客的喜悦劲儿,只有学者的冷淡神态。吃完了第一串香蕉,他又要了第二串。然后,他从经常带在身边的工具箱里,掏出一个装着精密仪器的小盒子。他以钻石商人的怀疑态度仔细研究了一个香蕉:用专门的柳叶刀从香蕉上剖下一片,放在药秤上称了称它的重量,拿军械技师的卡规量了量它的宽度。随后,他又从箱子里取出另一套仪器,测定温度、空气湿度和阳光强度。这些繁琐的手续是那样引人入胜,以致谁也不能平静地吃,都在等待赫伯特先生发表最后意见,看看究竟是怎么一回事,但他并没有说出一句能够使人猜到他的心思的话来。随后几天,有人看见赫伯特先生拿着捕蝶网和小篮子在市镇郊区捕捉蝴蝶。

下星期三,这儿来了一批工程师、农艺师、水文学家、地形测绘员和土地丈量员,他们在几小时内就勘探了赫伯特先生捕捉蝴蝶的地方。然后,一个叫杰克.布劳恩先生的也乘火车来了;他乘坐的银色车厢是加挂在黄色列车尾部的,有丝绒软椅和蓝色玻璃车顶。在另一个车厢里,还有一些身穿黑衣服的重要官员,全都围着布劳恩先生转来转去;他们就是从前到处都跟随着奥雷连诺上校的那些律师,这使人不得不想到,这批农艺师、水文学家、地形测绘员和土地丈量员,象赫伯特先生跟他的气球和花蝴蝶一样,也象布劳恩先生跟他那安了轮子的陵墓与凶恶的德国牧羊犬一样,是同战争有某种关系的。然而没有多少时间加以思考,多疑的马孔多居民刚刚提出问题:到底会发生什么事,这市镇已经变成了一个营地,搭起了锌顶木棚,棚子里住满了外国人,他们几乎是从世界各地乘坐火车——不仅坐在车厢里和平台上,而且坐在车顶上——来到这儿的。没过多久,外国佬就把没精打采的老婆接来了,这些女人穿的是凡而纱衣服,戴的是薄纱大帽,于是,他们又在铁道另一边建立了一个市镇;镇上有棕榈成荫的街道,还有窗户安了铁丝网的房屋,阳台上摆着白色桌子,天花板上吊着叶片挺大的电扇,此外还有宽阔的绿色草坪,孔雀和鹌鹑在草坪上荡来荡去。整个街区围上了很高的金属栅栏,活象一个硕大的电气化养鸡场。在凉爽的夏天的早晨,栅栏上边蹲着一只只燕子,总是显得黑压压的。还没有人清楚地知道:这些外国人在马孔多寻找什么呢,或者他们只是一些慈善家;然而,他们已在这儿闹得天翻地覆——他们造成的混乱大大超过了从前吉卜赛人造成的混乱,而且这种混乱根本不是短时间的、容易理解的。他们借助上帝才有的力量,改变了雨水的状况,缩短了庄稼成熟的时间,迁移了河道,甚至把河里的白色石头都搬到市镇另一头的墓地后面去了。就在那个时候,在霍·阿卡蒂奥坟琢褪了色的砖石上面,加了一层钢筋混凝土,免得河水染上尸骨发出的火药气味。对于那些没带家眷的外国人,多情的法国艺妓们居住的一条街就变成了他们消遣的地方,这个地方比金属栅栏后面的市镇更大,有个星期三开到的一列火车,载来了一批十分奇特的妓女和善于勾引的巴比伦女人,她们甚至懂得各种古老的诱惑方法,能够刺激阳萎者,鼓舞胆怯者,满足贪婪者,激发文弱者,教训傲慢者,改造遁世者。土耳其人街上是一家家灯火辉煌的舶来品商店,这些商店代替了古老的阿拉伯店铺,星期六晚上这儿都虞集着一群群冒险家:有的围在牌桌旁,有的站在靶场上,有的在小街小巷里算命和圆梦,有的在餐桌上大吃大喝,星期天早晨,地上到处都是尸体,有些死者是胡闹的醉汉,但多半是爱看热闹的倒霉蛋,都是在夜间斗殴时被枪打死的、拳头揍死的、刀子戳死的或者瓶子砸死的。马孔多突然涌进那么多的人,最初街道都无法通行,因为到处都是家具、箱子和各种建筑材料。有些人没有得到许可,就随便在什么空地上给自己盖房子;此外还会撞见一种丑恶的景象——成双成对的人大白天在杏树之间挂起吊床,当众乱搞。唯一宁静的角落是爱好和平的西印度黑人开辟的——他们在镇郊建立了整整一条街道,两旁是木桩架搭的房子,每天傍晚,他们坐在房前的小花园里,用古怪的语言唱起了抑郁的圣歌。在短时间里发生了那么多的变化,以致在赫伯特先生访问之后过了八个月,马孔多的老居民已经认不得自己的市镇了。

“瞧,咱们招惹了多少麻烦,”奥雷连诺上校那时常说,“都是因为咱们用香蕉招待了一个外国佬。”

恰恰相反,奥雷连诺第二看见外国人洪水般地涌来,就控制不住自己的高兴。家中很快挤满了各式各样的陌生人,挤满了世界各地来的不可救药的二流子,因此需要在院子里增建新的住房,扩大饭厅,用一张能坐十六个人的餐桌代替旧的桌子,购置新的碗碟器皿;即使如此,吃饭还得轮班。菲兰达只好克制自己的厌恶,象侍候国王一样侍候这些最无道德的客人:他们把靴底的泥土弄在廊上,直接在花园里撒尿,午休时想把席子铺在哪儿就铺在哪儿,想说什么就说什么,根本就不注意妇女的羞涩和男人的耻笑。阿玛兰塔被这帮鄙俗的家伙弄得气恼已极,又象从前那样在厨房里吃饭了。奥雷连诺上校相信,他们大多数人到作坊里来向他致意,并不是出于同情或者尊敬他,而是好奇地希望看看历史的遗物,看看博物馆的古董,所以他就闩上了门,现在除了极少的情况,再也看不见他坐在当街的门口了。相反地,乌苏娜甚至已经步履瞒珊、摸着墙壁走路了,但在每一列火车到达的前夜,她都象孩子一般高兴。“咱们得预备一些鱼肉,”她向四个厨娘吩咐道,她们急于在圣索菲娅.德拉佩德沉着的指挥下把一切都准备好。“咱们得预备一切东西,”她坚持说,“因为咱们压根儿不知道这些外国人想吃啥。”在一天最热的时刻,列车到达了。午餐时,整座房子象市场一样闹哄哄的,汗流浃背的食客甚至还不知道谁是慷慨的主人,就闹喳喳地蜂拥而入,慌忙在桌边占据最好的座位,而厨娘们却彼此相撞,她们端来了一锅锅汤、一盘盘肉菜、一碗碗饭,用长柄勺把整桶整桶的柠檬水舀到玻璃杯里。房子里混乱已极,菲兰达想到许多人吃了两次就很恼火,所以,当漫不经心的食客把她的家当成小酒馆,向她要账单的时候,她真想用市场上菜贩的语言发泄自己的愤怒。赫伯特先生来访之后过了一年多时间,大家只明白了一点:外国佬打算在一片魔力控制的土地上种植香蕉树,这片土地就是霍·阿·布恩蒂亚一帮人去寻找伟大发明时经过的土地。奥雷连诺上校的另外两个脑门上仍有灰十字的儿子又到了马孔多,他们是被涌入市镇的火山熔岩般的巨大人流卷来的,为了证明自己来得有理,他们讲的一句话大概能够说明每个人前来这儿的原因。

“我们到这儿来,”他俩说,“因为大家都来嘛。”

俏姑娘雷麦黛丝是唯一没有染上“香蕉热”的人。她仿佛停留在美妙的青春期,越来越讨厌各种陈规,越来越不在乎别人的嫌厌和怀疑,只在自己简单的现实世界里寻求乐趣。她不明白娘儿们为什么要用乳罩和裙子把自己的生活搞得那么复杂,就拿粗麻布缝了一件肥大的衣服,直接从头上套下去,一劳永逸地解决了穿衣服的问题,这样既穿了衣服,又觉得自己是裸体的,因为她认为裸体状态在家庭环境里是唯一合适的。家里的人总是劝她把长及大腿的蓬松头发剪短一些,编成辫子,别上篦子,扎上红色丝带;她听了腻烦,干脆剃光了头,把自己的头发做成了圣像的假发。她下意识地喜欢简单化,但最奇怪的是,她越摆脱时髦、寻求舒服,越坚决反对陈规、顺从自由爱好,她那惊人之美就越动人,她对男人就越有吸引力。奥雷连诺上校的儿子们第一次来到马孔多的时候,乌苏娜想到他们的血管里流着跟曾孙女相同的血,就象从前那样害怕得发抖。“千万小心啊,”她警告俏姑娘雷麦黛丝。“跟他们当中的任何一个人瞎来,你的孩子都会有猪尾巴。”俏姑娘雷麦黛丝不太重视曾祖母的话,很快穿上男人的衣服,在沙地上打了打滚,想爬上抹了油脂的竿子,这几乎成了十二个亲戚之间发生悲剧的缘由,因为他们都给这种忍受不了的景象弄疯了。正由于这一点,他们来到的时候,乌苏娜不让他们任何一个在家里过夜,而留居马孔多的那四个呢,按照她的吩咐,在旁边租了几个房间。如果有人向俏姑娘雷麦黛丝说起这些预防措施,她大概是会笑死的。直到她在世上的最后一刻,她始终都不知道命运使她成了一个扰乱男人安宁的女人,犹如寻常的天灾似的。每一次,她违背乌苏娜的禁令,出现在饭厅里的时候,外国人中间都会发生骚乱。一切都太显眼了,除了一件肥大的粗麻布衣服,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝是赤裸裸的,而且谁也不能相信,她那完美的光头不是一种挑衅,就象她露出大腿来乘凉的那种无耻样儿和饭后舔手指的快活劲儿不是罪恶的挑逗。布恩蒂亚家中没有一个人料到,外国人很快就已发觉:俏姑娘雷麦黛丝身上发出一种引起不安的气味,令人头晕的气味,在她离开之后,这些气味还会在空气中停留几个小时。在世界各地经历过情场痛苦的男人认为,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝的天生气味在他们身上激起的欲望,他们从前是不曾感到过的。在秋海棠长廊上,在客厅里,在房中的任何一个角落里,他们经常能够准确地指出俏姑娘雷麦黛丝呆过的地方,断定她离开之后过了多少时间,她在空气中留下了清楚的痕迹,这种痕迹跟任何东西都不会相混:家里的人谁也没有觉出它来,因为它早已成了家中日常气味中的一部分,可是外人立刻就把它嗅出来了。所以只有他们明白,那个年轻的军官为什么会死于爱情,而从远地来的那个绅士为什么会陷于绝望。俏姑娘雷麦黛丝由于不知道自己身上有一种引起不安的自然力量,她在场时就会激起男人心中难以忍受的慌乱感觉,所以她对待他们是没有一点虚假的,她的天真热情终于弄得他们神魂颠倒起来。乌苏娜为了不让外国人看见自己的曾孙女,要她跟阿玛兰塔一起在厨房里吃饭,这一点甚至使她感到高兴,因为她毕竟用不着服从什么规矩了。其实,什么时候在哪几吃饭,她是不在乎的,她宁愿不按规定的时间吃饭,想吃就吃。有时,她会忽然在清晨三点起来吃点东西,然后一直睡到傍晚,连续几个月打乱作息时间表,直到最后某种意外的情况才使她重新遵守家中规定的制度。然而,即使情况有了好转,她也早上十一点起床,一丝不挂地在浴室里呆到下午两点,一面打蝎子,一面从深沉和长久的迷梦中逐渐清醒过来。然后,她才用水瓢从贮水器里舀起水来,开始冲洗身子。这种长时间的、细致的程序,夹了许多美妙的动作,不大了解俏姑娘雷麦黛丝的人可能以为她在理所当然地欣赏自己的身姿。然而,实际上,这些奇妙的动作没有任何意义,只是俏姑娘雷麦黛丝吃饭之前消磨时光的办法。有一次,她刚开始冲洗身子,就有个陌生人在屋顶上揭开一块瓦:他一瞅见俏姑娘雷麦黛丝赤身露体的惊人景象,连气都喘不过来人她在瓦片之间发现了他那凄凉的眼睛,并不害臊,而是不安。

“当心,”她惊叫一声。“你会掉下来的。”

“我光想瞧瞧你,”陌生人咕噜说。

“哦,好吧,”她说,“可你得小心点儿,屋顶完全腐朽啦。”

陌个人脸上露出惊异和痛苦的表情,他似乎在闷不作声地跟原始本能搏斗,生怕奇妙的幻景消失。俏姑娘雷麦黛丝却以为他怕屋顶塌下,就尽量比平常洗得快些,不愿让这个人长久处在危险之中。姑娘一面冲洗身子,一面向他说,这屋顶的状况很糟,因为瓦上铺的树叶被雨水淋得腐烂了,蝎子也就钻进浴室来了。陌生人以为她嘀嘀咕咕是在掩饰她的青睐,所以她在身上擦肥皂时,他就耐不住想碰碰运气。

“让我给你擦肥皂吧,”他嘟嚷说。

“谢谢你的好意,”她回答,“可我的两只手完全够啦。”

“嗨,哪怕光给你擦擦背也好,”陌生人恳求。

“为啥?”她觉得奇怪。“哪儿见过用肥皂擦背的?”

接着,当地擦干身子的时候,陌生人泪汪汪地央求她嫁给他。她坦率地回答他说,她决不嫁给一个憨头憨脑的人,因为他浪费了几乎一个小时,连饭都不吃,光是为了观看一个洗澡的女人。俏姑娘雷麦黛丝最后穿上肥大衣服时,陌生人亲眼看见,正象许多人的猜测,她的确是把衣服直接套在光身上的,他认为这个秘密完全得到了证实。他又挪开两块瓦,打算跳进浴室。

“这儿挺高,”姑娘惊骇地警告他,“你会摔死的!”

腐朽的屋顶象山崩一样轰然塌下,陌生人几乎来不及发出恐怖的叫声,就掉到洋灰地上,撞破脑袋,立即毙命。从饭厅里闻声跑来的一群外国人,连忙把尸体搬出去时.觉得他的皮肤发出俏姑娘雷麦黛丝令人窒息的气味。这种气味深深地钻进了死者的身体内部:从他的脑壳裂缝里渗出来的甚至也不是血,而是充满了这种神秘气味的玻璃色油:大家立即明白,一个男人即使死了,在他的骸骨化成灰之前,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝的气味仍在折磨他,然而,谁也没有把这件可怕的事跟另外两个为俏姑娘雷麦黛丝丧命的男人联系起来。在又一个人牺牲之后,外国人和马孔多的许多老居民才相信这么个传说:俏姑娘雷麦黛丝身上发出的不是爱情的气息,而是死亡的气息。几个月以后的一桩事情证实了这种说法。有一天下午,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝和女友们一起去参观新的香蕉园。马孔多居民有一种时髦的消遣,就是在一行行香蕉树之间的通道上遛哒,通道没有尽头,满是潮气,宁静极了;这种宁静的空气是挺新奇的,仿佛是从什么地方原封不动移来的,那里的人似乎还没享受过它,它还不会清楚地传达声音,有时在半米的距离内,也听不清别人说些什么,可是从种植园另一头传来的声音却绝对清楚。马孔多的姑娘们利用这种奇怪的现象来做游戏,嬉闹呀,恐吓呀,说笑呀,晚上谈起这种旅游,仿佛在谈一场荒唐的梦。马孔多香蕉林的宁静是很有名气的,乌苏娜不忍心阻拦俏姑娘雷麦黛丝去玩玩,那天下午叫她戴上帽子、穿上体面的衣服,就让她去了。姑娘们刚刚走进香蕉园,空气中马上充满了致命的气味,正在挖灌溉渠的一伙男人,觉得自己被某种神奇的魔力控制住了,遇到了什么看不见的危险,其中许多人止不住想哭。俏姑娘和惊惶失措的女友们好不容易钻进最近的一座房子,躲避一群向她们凶猛扑来的男人。过了一阵,姑娘们才由四个奥雷连诺救了出来,他们额上的灰十字使人感到一种神秘的恐怖,好象它们是等级符号,是刀枪不入的标志。俏姑娘雷麦黛丝没告诉任何人,有个工人利用混乱伸手抓住她的肚子,犹如鹰爪抓住悬崖的边沿。瞬息间,仿佛有一道明亮的白光使她两眼发花,她朝这人转过身去,便看见了绝望的目光,这目光刺进她的心房,在那里点燃了怜悯的炭火。傍晚,在土耳其人街上,这个工人吹嘘自己的勇敢和运气,可是几分钟之后。马蹄就踩烂了他的胸膛;一群围观的外国人看见他在马路中间垂死挣扎,躺在自己吐出的一摊血里。

俏姑娘雷麦黛丝拥有置人死地的能力,这种猜测现在已由四个不可辩驳的事例证实了。虽然有些喜欢吹牛的人说,跟这样迷人的娘儿们睡上一夜,不要命也是值得的,但是谁也没有这么干。其实,要博得她的欢心,又不会受到她的致命伤害,只要有一种原始的、朴素的感情——爱情就够了,然而这一点正是谁也没有想到的。乌苏娜不再关心自己的曾孙女儿了。以前,她还想挽救这个姑娘的时候,曾让她对一些简单的家务发生兴趣。“男人需要的比你所想的多,”她神秘地说。“除了你所想的,还需要你没完没了地做饭啦,打扫啦,为鸡毛蒜皮的事伤脑筋啦。”乌苏娜心里明白,她竭力教导这个姑娘如何获得家庭幸福,是她在欺骗自己,因为她相信:世上没有那么一个男人,满足自己的情欲之后,还能忍受俏姑娘雷麦黛丝叫人无法理解的疏懒。最后一个霍.阿卡蒂奥刚刚出世,乌苏娜就拼命想使他成为一个教皇,也就不再关心曾孙女儿了。她让姑娘听天由命,相信无奇不有的世界总会出现奇迹,迟早能够找到一个很有耐性的男人来承受这个负担,在很长的时期里,阿玛兰塔已经放弃了使悄姑娘雷麦黛丝适应家务的一切打算。在很久以前的那些晚上,在阿玛兰塔的房间里,她养育的姑娘勉强同意转动缝纫机把手的饲·候,她就终于认为俏姑娘雷麦黛丝只是一个笨蛋。“我们得用抽彩的办法把你卖出去,”她担心姑娘对男人主个无动于衷,就向她说。后来,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝去教堂时,乌苏娜嘱咐她蒙上面纱,阿玛兰塔以为这种神秘办法倒是很诱人的,也许很快就会出现一个十分好奇的男人,耐心地在她心中寻找薄弱的地方。但是,在这姑娘轻率地拒绝一个在各方面都比任何王子都迷人的追求者之后,阿玛兰塔失去了最后的希望。而菲兰达呢,她根本不想了解俏姑娘雷麦黛丝。她在血腥的狂欢节瞧见这个穿着女王衣服的姑娘时,本来以为这是一个非凡的人物。可是,当她发现雷麦黛丝用手吃饭,而且只能回答一两句蠢话时,她就慨叹布恩蒂亚家的白痴存在太久啦。尽管奥雷连诺上校仍然相信,并且说了又说,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝实际上是他见过的人当中头脑最清醒的人,她经常用她挖苫别人的惊人本领证明了这一点,但家里的人还是让她走自己的路。于是,俏姑娘雷麦黛丝开始在孤独的沙漠里徘徊,但没感到任何痛苦,并且在没有梦魇的酣睡中,在没完没了的休浴中,在不按时的膳食中,在长久的沉恩中,逐渐成长起来。直到三月里的一天下午,菲兰达打算取下花园中绳子上的床单,想把它们折起来,呼唤家中的女人来帮忙。她们刚刚动手,阿玛兰塔发现俏姑娘雷麦黛丝突然变得异常紧张和苍白。

“你觉得不好吗?”她问。

悄姑娘雷麦黛丝双手抓住床单的另一头,惨然地微笑了一下。

“完全相反,我从来没有感到这么好。”

俏姑娘雷麦黛丝话刚落音,菲兰达突然发现一道闪光,她手里的床单被一阵轻风卷走,在空中全幅展开。悄姑娘雷麦黛丝抓住床单的一头,开始凌空升起的时候,阿玛兰塔感到裙子的花边神秘地拂动。乌苏娜几乎已经失明,只有她一个人十分镇定,能够识别风的性质——她让床单在闪光中随风而去,瞧见俏姑娘雷麦黛丝向她挥手告别;姑娘周围是跟她一起升空的、白得耀眼的、招展的床单,床单跟她一起离开了甲虫飞红、天竺牡丹盛开的环境,下午四点钟就跟她飞过空中,永远消失在上层空间,甚至飞得最高的鸟儿也迫不上她了。

外国人当然认为雷麦黛丝终于屈从了蜂王难免的命运,而她家里的人却想用升天的神话挽回她的面子。菲兰达满怀嫉妒,最终承认了这个奇迹,很长时间都在恳求上帝送回她的床单。马孔多的大多数土著居民也相信这个奇迹,甚至点起蜡烛举行安魂祈祷。大概,如果不是所有的奥雷连诺惨遭野蛮屠杀的恐怖事件代替了大家的惊讶,大家长久都不会去谈其他的事情。在某种程度上,奥雷连诺上校预感到了儿子们的悲惨结局,虽然没有明确这种感觉就是预兆。跟成群的外国人一起来到马孔多的,还有奥雷连诺.塞拉多和奥雷连诺·阿卡亚,他俩希望留在马孔多的时候,父亲却想劝阻他们。现在,天一黑走路就很危险,他不明白这两个儿子将在镇上干些什么。可是,奥雷连诺·森腾诺和奥雷连诺·特里斯特在奥雷连诺第二的支持下,却让两个兄弟在自己的工厂里干活。奥雷连诺上校是有理由反对这种决定的,虽说他的理由还很不清楚。布劳恩先生是坐着第一辆小汽车来到马孔多的——这是一辆桔黄色的小汽车,装有可以折起的顶篷,嘟嘟的喇叭声吓得镇上的狗狺狺直叫;奥雷连诺上校看见这个外国佬的时候,就对镇上的人在这个外国佬面前的卑躬样儿感到愤怒,知道他们自从扔下妻子儿女、扛起武器走向战争以来,精神面貌已经发生了变化。在尼兰德停战协定以后,掌管马孔多的是一个失去了独立性的镇民,是从爱好和平的、困倦的保守党人中间选出的一些无权的法官。“这是残废管理处,”奥雷连诺上校看见手持木棒的赤足警察,就说。“我们打了那么多的仗,都是为了不把自己的房子刷成蓝色嘛。”然而,香蕉公司出现以后,专横傲慢的外国人代替了地方官吏,布劳恩先生让他们住在 “电气化养鸡场”里,享受高等人士的特权,不会象镇上其他的人那样苦于酷热和蚊子,也不会象别人那样感到许多不便和困难。手执大砍刀的雇佣刽子手取代了以前的警察。奥雷连诺上校关在自己的作坊里思考这些变化,在长年的孤独中第一次痛切地坚信,没把战争进行到底是他的错误。正巧有一天,大家早已忘却的马格尼菲柯.维斯巴尔的弟弟,带着一个七岁的孙子到广场上一个小摊跟前去喝柠檬水。小孩儿偶然把饮料洒到旁边一个警士班长的制服上,这个野蛮人就用锋利的大砍刀把小孩儿剁成了碎块,并且一下子砍掉了试图搭救孙子的祖父的脑袋。当几个男人把老头儿的尸体搬走的时候,全镇的人都看见了无头的尸体,看见了一个妇人手里拎着的脑袋,看见了一个装着孩子骸骨的、血淋淋的袋子。

这个景象结束了奥雷连诺上校的悔罪心情。年轻时,看见一个疯狗咬伤的妇人被枪托打死,他曾恼怒已极;现在他也象那时一样,望着街上一群麇集的观众,就用往常那种雷鸣般的声音(因他无比地憎恨自己,他的声音又洪亮了),向他们发泄再也不能遏制的满腔怒火。

“等着吧,”他大声叫嚷。“最近几天我就把武器发给我的一群孩子,让他们除掉这些坏透了的外国佬。”

随后整整一个星期,在海边不同的地方,奥雷连诺的十七个儿子都象兔子一样遭到隐蔽的歹徒袭击,歹徒专门瞄准灰十字的中心。晚上七时,奥雷连诺·特里斯特从白己的母亲家里出来,黑暗中突然一声枪响,子弹打穿了他的脑门。奥雷连诺.森腾诺是在工厂里他经常睡觉的吊床上被发现的,他的双眉之间插着一根碎冰锥,只有把手露在外面。奥雷连诺·塞拉多看完电影把女朋友送回了家,沿着灯火辉煌的上耳其人街回来的时候,藏在人群中的一个凶手用手枪向前看他射击,使得他直接倒在一口滚沸的油锅里。五分钟之后,有人敲了敲奥雷连诺.阿卡亚和他妻子的房门,呼叫了一声:“快,他们正在屠杀你的兄弟们啦,”后来这个女人说,奥雷连诺·阿卡亚跳下床,开了门,门外的一支毛瑟枪击碎了他的脑壳。在这死亡之夜里,家中的人准备为四个死者祈祷的时候,菲兰达象疯子似的奔过市镇去寻找自己的丈夫;佩特娜·柯特以为黑名单包括所有跟上校同名的人,已把奥雷连诺第二藏在衣橱里,直到第四天,从沿海各地拍来的电报知道,暗敌袭击的只是画了灰十字的弟兄。阿玛兰塔找出一个记录了侄儿们情况的小本子,收到一封封电报之后,她就划掉一个个名字,最后只剩了最大的一个奥雷连比的名字。家里的人清楚地记得他,因为他的黑皮肤和绿眼睛是对照鲜明的,他叫奥需连诺·阿马多,是个木匠,住在山麓的一个村子里,奥雷连诺上校等候他的死汛空等了两个星期,就派了一个人去警告奥雷连诺.阿马多,以为他可能不知道自己面临的危险。这个人回来报告说,奥雷连诺.阿马多安全无恙。在大屠杀的夜晚,有两个人到他那儿去,用手枪向他射击,可是未能击中灰十字。奥雷连诺.阿马多跳过院墙,就在山里消失了;由于跟出售木柴给他的印第安人一直友好往来,他知道那里的每一条小烃,以后就再也没有听到他的消息了。

对奥雷连诺上校来说,这是黑暗的日子。共和国总统用电报向他表示慰问,答应进行彻底调查,并且赞扬死者。根据总统的指示,镇长带者四个花圈参加丧礼,想把它们放在棺材上,上校却把它们摆在街上。安葬之后,他拟了一份措词尖锐的电报给共和国总统,亲自送到邮电局,可是电报员拒绝拍发。于是,奥宙连诺上校用极不友好的问句充实了电文。放在信封里邮寄,就象妻子死后那样,也象战争中他的好友们死亡时多次经历过的那样,他感到的不是悲哀,而是盲目的愤怒和软弱无能,他甚至指责安东尼奥.伊萨贝尔是同谋犯,故意在他的儿子们脸上阿上擦洗不掉的十字,使得敌人能够认出他们。老朽的神父已经有点儿头脑昏馈,在讲坛上布道时竟胡乱解释《圣经》,吓唬教区居民;有一天下午,他拿着一个通常在大斋第一天用来盛圣灰的大碗,来到布恩蒂亚家里,想给全家的人抹上圣灰,表明圣灰是容易擦掉的。可是大家心中生怕倒霉,甚至菲兰达也不让他在她身上试验;以后,在大斋的第一天,再也没有一个布恩蒂亚家里的人跪在圣坛栏杆跟前了。

在很长时间里,奥雷连诺上校未能恢复失去的平静。他怀着满腔的怒火不再制作全鱼,勉强进点饮食,在地上拖着斗篷,象梦游人一样在房子里踱来踱去。到了第三个月末尾,他的头发完全白了,从前卷起的胡梢垂在没有血色的嘴唇两边,可是两只眼睛再一次成了两块燃烧的炭火;在他出生时,这两只眼睛曾把在场的人吓了一跳,而且两眼一扫就能让椅子移动。奥雷迁诺上校满怀愤怒,妄图在自己身上找到某种预感,那种预感曾使他年轻时沿着危险的小道走向光荣的荒漠。他迷失在这座陌生的房子里,这里的任何人和任何东西都已激不起他的一点儿感情。有一次他走进梅尔加德斯的房间,打算找出战前的遗迹,但他只看见垃圾、秽物和各种破烂,这些都是荒芜多年之后堆积起来的。那些早已无人阅读的书,封面和羊皮纸已被潮气毁坏,布满了绿霉,而房子里往日最明净的空气,也充溢着难以忍受的腐烂气味。另一天早晨,他发现乌苏娜在栗树底下——她正把头伏在已故的丈夫膝上抽泣。在半个世纪的狂风暴雨中弄弯了腰的这个老头儿,奥雷连诺是个家长久没有看见过他的唯一的人。“向你父亲问安吧,”乌苏娜说。他在栗树前面停了片刻,再一次看见,即使这块主地也没激起他的任何感情。

“他在说什么呀!”奥雷连诺上校问道。

“他很难过,”乌苏娜回答。“他以为你该死啦。”

“告诉他吧,”上校笑着说。“人不是该死的时候死的,而是能死的时候死的。”

亡父的预言激起了他心中最后剩下的一点儿傲气,可是他把这种刹那间的傲气错误地当成了突然进发的力量。他向母亲追问,在圣约瑟夫石膏像里发现的金币究竟藏在哪儿。“这你永远不会知道,”由于过去的痛苦教训,她坚定地说。“有朝一日财主来了,他才能把它挖出来,谁也无法理解,一个经常无私的人,为什么突然


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 avalanche 8ujzl     
n.雪崩,大量涌来
参考例句:
  • They were killed by an avalanche in the Swiss Alps.他们在瑞士阿尔卑斯山的一次雪崩中罹难。
  • Higher still the snow was ready to avalanche.在更高处积雪随时都会崩塌。
2 invincible 9xMyc     
adj.不可征服的,难以制服的
参考例句:
  • This football team was once reputed to be invincible.这支足球队曾被誉为无敌的劲旅。
  • The workers are invincible as long as they hold together.只要工人团结一致,他们就是不可战胜的。
3 scruples 14d2b6347f5953bad0a0c5eebf78068a     
n.良心上的不安( scruple的名词复数 );顾虑,顾忌v.感到于心不安,有顾忌( scruple的第三人称单数 )
参考例句:
  • I overcame my moral scruples. 我抛开了道德方面的顾虑。
  • I'm not ashamed of my scruples about your family. They were natural. 我并未因为对你家人的顾虑而感到羞耻。这种感觉是自然而然的。 来自疯狂英语突破英语语调
4 siesta Urayw     
n.午睡
参考例句:
  • Lots of people were taking a short siesta in the shade.午后很多人在阴凉处小睡。
  • He had acquired the knack of snatching his siesta in the most unfavourable circumstance.他学会了在最喧闹的场合下抓紧时间睡觉的诀窍。
5 spoke XryyC     
n.(车轮的)辐条;轮辐;破坏某人的计划;阻挠某人的行动 v.讲,谈(speak的过去式);说;演说;从某种观点来说
参考例句:
  • They sourced the spoke nuts from our company.他们的轮辐螺帽是从我们公司获得的。
  • The spokes of a wheel are the bars that connect the outer ring to the centre.辐条是轮子上连接外圈与中心的条棒。
6 plebeian M2IzE     
adj.粗俗的;平民的;n.平民;庶民
参考例句:
  • He is a philosophy professor with a cockney accent and an alarmingly plebeian manner.他是个有一口伦敦土腔、举止粗俗不堪的哲学教授。
  • He spent all day playing rackets on the beach,a plebeian sport if there ever was one.他一整天都在海滩玩壁球,再没有比这更不入流的运动了。
7 relic 4V2xd     
n.神圣的遗物,遗迹,纪念物
参考例句:
  • This stone axe is a relic of ancient times.这石斧是古代的遗物。
  • He found himself thinking of the man as a relic from the past.他把这个男人看成是过去时代的人物。
8 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  • This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  • There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
9 juvenile OkEy2     
n.青少年,少年读物;adj.青少年的,幼稚的
参考例句:
  • For a grown man he acted in a very juvenile manner.身为成年人,他的行为举止显得十分幼稚。
  • Juvenile crime is increasing at a terrifying rate.青少年犯罪正在以惊人的速度增长。
10 imperturbable dcQzG     
adj.镇静的
参考例句:
  • Thomas,of course,was cool and aloof and imperturbable.当然,托马斯沉着、冷漠,不易激动。
  • Edward was a model of good temper and his equanimity imperturbable.爱德华是个典型的好性子,他总是沉着镇定。
11 bustle esazC     
v.喧扰地忙乱,匆忙,奔忙;n.忙碌;喧闹
参考例句:
  • The bustle and din gradually faded to silence as night advanced.随着夜越来越深,喧闹声逐渐沉寂。
  • There is a lot of hustle and bustle in the railway station.火车站里非常拥挤。
12 perspiring 0818633761fb971685d884c4c363dad6     
v.出汗,流汗( perspire的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • He had been working hard and was perspiring profusely. 他一直在努力干活,身上大汗淋漓的。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • So they "went it lively," panting and perspiring with the work. 于是他们就“痛痛快快地比一比”了,结果比得两个人气喘吁吁、汗流浃背。 来自英汉文学 - 汤姆历险
13 gourd mfWxh     
n.葫芦
参考例句:
  • Are you going with him? You must be out of your gourd.你和他一块去?你一定是疯了。
  • Give me a gourd so I can bail.把葫芦瓢给我,我好把水舀出去。
14 gourds 1636ce21bb8431b34145df5b9c485150     
n.葫芦( gourd的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Dried gourds are sometimes used as ornaments. 干葫芦有时用作饰品。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The villagers use gourds for holding water. 村民们用葫芦盛水。 来自《简明英汉词典》
15 disorder Et1x4     
n.紊乱,混乱;骚动,骚乱;疾病,失调
参考例句:
  • When returning back,he discovered the room to be in disorder.回家后,他发现屋子里乱七八糟。
  • It contained a vast number of letters in great disorder.里面七零八落地装着许多信件。
16 enchanted enchanted     
adj. 被施魔法的,陶醉的,入迷的 动词enchant的过去式和过去分词
参考例句:
  • She was enchanted by the flowers you sent her. 她非常喜欢你送给她的花。
  • He was enchanted by the idea. 他为这个主意而欣喜若狂。
17 drawn MuXzIi     
v.拖,拉,拔出;adj.憔悴的,紧张的
参考例句:
  • All the characters in the story are drawn from life.故事中的所有人物都取材于生活。
  • Her gaze was drawn irresistibly to the scene outside.她的目光禁不住被外面的风景所吸引。
18 volcanic BLgzQ     
adj.火山的;象火山的;由火山引起的
参考例句:
  • There have been several volcanic eruptions this year.今年火山爆发了好几次。
  • Volcanic activity has created thermal springs and boiling mud pools.火山活动产生了温泉和沸腾的泥浆池。
19 belch GuazY     
v.打嗝,喷出
参考例句:
  • Cucumber makes me belch.黃瓜吃得我打嗝。
  • Plant chimneys belch out dense smoke.工厂的烟囱冒出滚滚浓烟。
20 justified 7pSzrk     
a.正当的,有理的
参考例句:
  • She felt fully justified in asking for her money back. 她认为有充分的理由要求退款。
  • The prisoner has certainly justified his claims by his actions. 那个囚犯确实已用自己的行动表明他的要求是正当的。
21 adolescence CyXzY     
n.青春期,青少年
参考例句:
  • Adolescence is the process of going from childhood to maturity.青春期是从少年到成年的过渡期。
  • The film is about the trials and tribulations of adolescence.这部电影讲述了青春期的麻烦和苦恼。
22 malice P8LzW     
n.恶意,怨恨,蓄意;[律]预谋
参考例句:
  • I detected a suggestion of malice in his remarks.我觉察出他说的话略带恶意。
  • There was a strong current of malice in many of his portraits.他的许多肖像画中都透着一股强烈的怨恨。
23 omen N5jzY     
n.征兆,预兆;vt.预示
参考例句:
  • The superstitious regard it as a bad omen.迷信的人认为那是一种恶兆。
  • Could this at last be a good omen for peace?这是否终于可以视作和平的吉兆了?
24 thighs e4741ffc827755fcb63c8b296150ab4e     
n.股,大腿( thigh的名词复数 );食用的鸡(等的)腿
参考例句:
  • He's gone to London for skin grafts on his thighs. 他去伦敦做大腿植皮手术了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The water came up to the fisherman's thighs. 水没到了渔夫的大腿。 来自《简明英汉词典》
25 wigs 53e7a1f0d49258e236f1a412f2313400     
n.假发,法官帽( wig的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • They say that wigs will be coming in again this year. 据说今年又要流行戴假发了。 来自辞典例句
  • Frank, we needed more wigs than we thought, and we have to do some advertising. 弗兰克,因为我们需要更多的假发,而且我们还要做点广告。 来自电影对白
26 provocative e0Jzj     
adj.挑衅的,煽动的,刺激的,挑逗的
参考例句:
  • She wore a very provocative dress.她穿了一件非常性感的裙子。
  • His provocative words only fueled the argument further.他的挑衅性讲话只能使争论进一步激化。
27 veins 65827206226d9e2d78ea2bfe697c6329     
n.纹理;矿脉( vein的名词复数 );静脉;叶脉;纹理
参考例句:
  • The blood flows from the capillaries back into the veins. 血从毛细血管流回静脉。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • I felt a pleasant glow in all my veins from the wine. 喝过酒后我浑身的血都热烘烘的,感到很舒服。 来自《简明英汉词典》
28 shudder JEqy8     
v.战粟,震动,剧烈地摇晃;n.战粟,抖动
参考例句:
  • The sight of the coffin sent a shudder through him.看到那副棺材,他浑身一阵战栗。
  • We all shudder at the thought of the dreadful dirty place.我们一想到那可怕的肮脏地方就浑身战惊。
29 shuddered 70137c95ff493fbfede89987ee46ab86     
v.战栗( shudder的过去式和过去分词 );发抖;(机器、车辆等)突然震动;颤动
参考例句:
  • He slammed on the brakes and the car shuddered to a halt. 他猛踩刹车,车颤抖着停住了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • I shuddered at the sight of the dead body. 我一看见那尸体就战栗。 来自《简明英汉词典》
30 unbearable alCwB     
adj.不能容忍的;忍受不住的
参考例句:
  • It is unbearable to be always on thorns.老是处于焦虑不安的情况中是受不了的。
  • The more he thought of it the more unbearable it became.他越想越觉得无法忍受。
31 insistence A6qxB     
n.坚持;强调;坚决主张
参考例句:
  • They were united in their insistence that she should go to college.他们一致坚持她应上大学。
  • His insistence upon strict obedience is correct.他坚持绝对服从是对的。
32 unaware Pl6w0     
a.不知道的,未意识到的
参考例句:
  • They were unaware that war was near. 他们不知道战争即将爆发。
  • I was unaware of the man's presence. 我没有察觉到那人在场。
33 exasperation HiyzX     
n.愤慨
参考例句:
  • He snorted with exasperation.他愤怒地哼了一声。
  • She rolled her eyes in sheer exasperation.她气急败坏地转动着眼珠。
34 underneath VKRz2     
adj.在...下面,在...底下;adv.在下面
参考例句:
  • Working underneath the car is always a messy job.在汽车底下工作是件脏活。
  • She wore a coat with a dress underneath.她穿着一件大衣,里面套着一条连衣裙。
35 skull CETyO     
n.头骨;颅骨
参考例句:
  • The skull bones fuse between the ages of fifteen and twenty-five.头骨在15至25岁之间长合。
  • He fell out of the window and cracked his skull.他从窗子摔了出去,跌裂了颅骨。
36 provocation QB9yV     
n.激怒,刺激,挑拨,挑衅的事物,激怒的原因
参考例句:
  • He's got a fiery temper and flares up at the slightest provocation.他是火爆性子,一点就着。
  • They did not react to this provocation.他们对这一挑衅未作反应。
37 torment gJXzd     
n.折磨;令人痛苦的东西(人);vt.折磨;纠缠
参考例句:
  • He has never suffered the torment of rejection.他从未经受过遭人拒绝的痛苦。
  • Now nothing aggravates me more than when people torment each other.没有什么东西比人们的互相折磨更使我愤怒。
38 tormenting 6e14ac649577fc286f6d088293b57895     
使痛苦的,使苦恼的
参考例句:
  • He took too much pleasure in tormenting an ugly monster called Caliban. 他喜欢一味捉弄一个名叫凯列班的丑妖怪。
  • The children were scolded for tormenting animals. 孩子们因折磨动物而受到责骂。
39 disturbances a0726bd74d4516cd6fbe05e362bc74af     
n.骚乱( disturbance的名词复数 );打扰;困扰;障碍
参考例句:
  • The government has set up a commission of inquiry into the disturbances at the prison. 政府成立了一个委员会来调查监狱骚乱事件。
  • Extra police were called in to quell the disturbances. 已调集了增援警力来平定骚乱。
40 parlor v4MzU     
n.店铺,营业室;会客室,客厅
参考例句:
  • She was lying on a small settee in the parlor.她躺在客厅的一张小长椅上。
  • Is there a pizza parlor in the neighborhood?附近有没有比萨店?
41 plunged 06a599a54b33c9d941718dccc7739582     
v.颠簸( plunge的过去式和过去分词 );暴跌;骤降;突降
参考例句:
  • The train derailed and plunged into the river. 火车脱轨栽进了河里。
  • She lost her balance and plunged 100 feet to her death. 她没有站稳,从100英尺的高处跌下摔死了。
42 calamity nsizM     
n.灾害,祸患,不幸事件
参考例句:
  • Even a greater natural calamity cannot daunt us. 再大的自然灾害也压不垮我们。
  • The attack on Pearl Harbor was a crushing calamity.偷袭珍珠港(对美军来说)是一场毁灭性的灾难。
43 complaisance 1Xky2     
n.彬彬有礼,殷勤,柔顺
参考例句:
  • She speaks with complaisance.她说话彬彬有礼。
  • His complaisance leaves a good impression on her.他的彬彬有礼给她留下了深刻的印象。
44 imposing 8q9zcB     
adj.使人难忘的,壮丽的,堂皇的,雄伟的
参考例句:
  • The fortress is an imposing building.这座城堡是一座宏伟的建筑。
  • He has lost his imposing appearance.他已失去堂堂仪表。
45 WHIMS ecf1f9fe569e0760fc10bec24b97c043     
虚妄,禅病
参考例句:
  • The mate observed regretfully that he could not account for that young fellow's whims. 那位伙伴很遗憾地说他不能说出那年轻人产生怪念头的原因。
  • The rest she had for food and her own whims. 剩下的钱她用来吃饭和买一些自己喜欢的东西。 来自英汉文学 - 嘉莉妹妹
46 disarray 1ufx1     
n.混乱,紊乱,凌乱
参考例句:
  • His personal life fell into disarray when his wife left him.妻子离去后,他的个人生活一片混乱。
  • Our plans were thrown into disarray by the rail strike.铁路罢工打乱了我们的计划。
47 nude CHLxF     
adj.裸体的;n.裸体者,裸体艺术品
参考例句:
  • It's a painting of the Duchess of Alba in the nude.这是一幅阿尔巴公爵夫人的裸体肖像画。
  • She doesn't like nude swimming.她不喜欢裸泳。
48 killing kpBziQ     
n.巨额利润;突然赚大钱,发大财
参考例句:
  • Investors are set to make a killing from the sell-off.投资者准备清仓以便大赚一笔。
  • Last week my brother made a killing on Wall Street.上个周我兄弟在华尔街赚了一大笔。
49 scorpions 0f63b2c0873e8cba29ba4550835d32a9     
n.蝎子( scorpion的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • You promise me that Black Scorpions will never come back to Lanzhou. 你保证黑蝎子永远不再踏上兰州的土地。 来自电影对白
  • You Scorpions are rather secretive about your likes and dislikes. 天蝎:蝎子是如此的神秘,你的喜好很难被别人洞悉。 来自互联网
50 dense aONzX     
a.密集的,稠密的,浓密的;密度大的
参考例句:
  • The general ambushed his troops in the dense woods. 将军把部队埋伏在浓密的树林里。
  • The path was completely covered by the dense foliage. 小路被树叶厚厚地盖了一层。
51 cistern Uq3zq     
n.贮水池
参考例句:
  • The cistern is empty but soon fills again.蓄水池里现在没水,但不久就会储满水的。
  • The lavatory cistern overflowed.厕所水箱的水溢出来了
52 meticulous A7TzJ     
adj.极其仔细的,一丝不苟的
参考例句:
  • We'll have to handle the matter with meticulous care.这事一点不能含糊。
  • She is meticulous in her presentation of facts.她介绍事实十分详细。
53 adoration wfhyD     
n.爱慕,崇拜
参考例句:
  • He gazed at her with pure adoration.他一往情深地注视着她。
  • The old lady fell down in adoration before Buddhist images.那老太太在佛像面前顶礼膜拜。
54 solitary 7FUyx     
adj.孤独的,独立的,荒凉的;n.隐士
参考例句:
  • I am rather fond of a solitary stroll in the country.我颇喜欢在乡间独自徜徉。
  • The castle rises in solitary splendour on the fringe of the desert.这座城堡巍然耸立在沙漠的边际,显得十分壮美。
55 rite yCmzq     
n.典礼,惯例,习俗
参考例句:
  • This festival descends from a religious rite.这个节日起源于宗教仪式。
  • Most traditional societies have transition rites at puberty.大多数传统社会都为青春期的孩子举行成人礼。
56 desolate vmizO     
adj.荒凉的,荒芜的;孤独的,凄凉的;v.使荒芜,使孤寂
参考例句:
  • The city was burned into a desolate waste.那座城市被烧成一片废墟。
  • We all felt absolutely desolate when she left.她走后,我们都觉得万分孤寂。
57 stupor Kqqyx     
v.昏迷;不省人事
参考例句:
  • As the whisky took effect, he gradually fell into a drunken stupor.随着威士忌酒力发作,他逐渐醉得不省人事。
  • The noise of someone banging at the door roused her from her stupor.梆梆的敲门声把她从昏迷中唤醒了。
58 mirage LRqzB     
n.海市蜃楼,幻景
参考例句:
  • Perhaps we are all just chasing a mirage.也许我们都只是在追逐一个幻想。
  • Western liberalism was always a mirage.西方自由主义永远是一座海市蜃楼。
59 outright Qj7yY     
adv.坦率地;彻底地;立即;adj.无疑的;彻底的
参考例句:
  • If you have a complaint you should tell me outright.如果你有不满意的事,你应该直率地对我说。
  • You should persuade her to marry you outright.你应该彻底劝服她嫁给你。
60 suffocating suffocating     
a.使人窒息的
参考例句:
  • After a few weeks with her parents, she felt she was suffocating.和父母呆了几个星期后,她感到自己毫无自由。
  • That's better. I was suffocating in that cell of a room.这样好些了,我刚才在那个小房间里快闷死了。
61 fragrance 66ryn     
n.芬芳,香味,香气
参考例句:
  • The apple blossoms filled the air with their fragrance.苹果花使空气充满香味。
  • The fragrance of lavender filled the room.房间里充满了薰衣草的香味。
62 possessed xuyyQ     
adj.疯狂的;拥有的,占有的
参考例句:
  • He flew out of the room like a man possessed.他像着了魔似地猛然冲出房门。
  • He behaved like someone possessed.他行为举止像是魔怔了。
63 fascination FlHxO     
n.令人着迷的事物,魅力,迷恋
参考例句:
  • He had a deep fascination with all forms of transport.他对所有的运输工具都很着迷。
  • His letters have been a source of fascination to a wide audience.广大观众一直迷恋于他的来信。
64 succumbed 625a9b57aef7b895b965fdca2019ba63     
不再抵抗(诱惑、疾病、攻击等)( succumb的过去式和过去分词 ); 屈从; 被压垮; 死
参考例句:
  • The town succumbed after a short siege. 该城被围困不久即告失守。
  • After an artillery bombardment lasting several days the town finally succumbed. 在持续炮轰数日后,该城终于屈服了。
65 ferocious ZkNxc     
adj.凶猛的,残暴的,极度的,十分强烈的
参考例句:
  • The ferocious winds seemed about to tear the ship to pieces.狂风仿佛要把船撕成碎片似的。
  • The ferocious panther is chasing a rabbit.那只凶猛的豹子正追赶一只兔子。
66 tumult LKrzm     
n.喧哗;激动,混乱;吵闹
参考例句:
  • The tumult in the streets awakened everyone in the house.街上的喧哗吵醒了屋子里的每一个人。
  • His voice disappeared under growing tumult.他的声音消失在越来越响的喧哗声中。
67 precipice NuNyW     
n.悬崖,危急的处境
参考例句:
  • The hut hung half over the edge of the precipice.那间小屋有一半悬在峭壁边上。
  • A slight carelessness on this precipice could cost a man his life.在这悬崖上稍一疏忽就会使人丧生。
68 disconsolate OuOxR     
adj.忧郁的,不快的
参考例句:
  • He looked so disconsolate that It'scared her.他看上去情绪很坏,吓了她一跳。
  • At the dress rehearsal she was disconsolate.彩排时她闷闷不乐。
69 audacity LepyV     
n.大胆,卤莽,无礼
参考例句:
  • He had the audacity to ask for an increase in salary.他竟然厚着脸皮要求增加薪水。
  • He had the audacity to pick pockets in broad daylight.他竟敢在光天化日之下掏包。
70 bloody kWHza     
adj.非常的的;流血的;残忍的;adv.很;vt.血染
参考例句:
  • He got a bloody nose in the fight.他在打斗中被打得鼻子流血。
  • He is a bloody fool.他是一个十足的笨蛋。
71 vomiting 7ed7266d85c55ba00ffa41473cf6744f     
参考例句:
  • Symptoms include diarrhoea and vomiting. 症状有腹泻和呕吐。
  • Especially when I feel seasick, I can't stand watching someone else vomiting." 尤其晕船的时候,看不得人家呕。”
72 attain HvYzX     
vt.达到,获得,完成
参考例句:
  • I used the scientific method to attain this end. 我用科学的方法来达到这一目的。
  • His painstaking to attain his goal in life is praiseworthy. 他为实现人生目标所下的苦功是值得称赞的。
73 conjure tnRyN     
v.恳求,祈求;变魔术,变戏法
参考例句:
  • I conjure you not to betray me.我恳求你不要背弃我。
  • I can't simply conjure up the money out of thin air.我是不能像变魔术似的把钱变来。
74 primitive vSwz0     
adj.原始的;简单的;n.原(始)人,原始事物
参考例句:
  • It is a primitive instinct to flee a place of danger.逃离危险的地方是一种原始本能。
  • His book describes the march of the civilization of a primitive society.他的著作描述了一个原始社会的开化过程。
75 sweeping ihCzZ4     
adj.范围广大的,一扫无遗的
参考例句:
  • The citizens voted for sweeping reforms.公民投票支持全面的改革。
  • Can you hear the wind sweeping through the branches?你能听到风掠过树枝的声音吗?
76 negligence IjQyI     
n.疏忽,玩忽,粗心大意
参考例句:
  • They charged him with negligence of duty.他们指责他玩忽职守。
  • The traffic accident was allegedly due to negligence.这次车祸据说是由于疏忽造成的。
77 sloth 4ELzP     
n.[动]树懒;懒惰,懒散
参考例句:
  • Absence of competition makes for sloth.没有竞争会导致懒惰。
  • The sloth spends most of its time hanging upside down from the branches.大部分时间里树懒都是倒挂在树枝上。
78 raffle xAHzs     
n.废物,垃圾,抽奖售卖;v.以抽彩出售
参考例句:
  • The money was raised by the sale of raffle tickets.这笔款子是通过出售购物彩券筹集的。
  • He won a car in the raffle.他在兑奖售物活动中赢得了一辆汽车。
79 perplexed A3Rz0     
adj.不知所措的
参考例句:
  • The farmer felt the cow,went away,returned,sorely perplexed,always afraid of being cheated.那农民摸摸那头牛,走了又回来,犹豫不决,总怕上当受骗。
  • The child was perplexed by the intricate plot of the story.这孩子被那头绪纷繁的故事弄得迷惑不解。
80 penetrate juSyv     
v.透(渗)入;刺入,刺穿;洞察,了解
参考例句:
  • Western ideas penetrate slowly through the East.西方观念逐渐传入东方。
  • The sunshine could not penetrate where the trees were thickest.阳光不能透入树木最浓密的地方。
81 intrigued 7acc2a75074482e2b408c60187e27c73     
adj.好奇的,被迷住了的v.搞阴谋诡计(intrigue的过去式);激起…的兴趣或好奇心;“intrigue”的过去式和过去分词
参考例句:
  • You've really intrigued me—tell me more! 你说的真有意思—再给我讲一些吧!
  • He was intrigued by her story. 他被她的故事迷住了。
82 carnival 4rezq     
n.嘉年华会,狂欢,狂欢节,巡回表演
参考例句:
  • I got some good shots of the carnival.我有几个狂欢节的精彩镜头。
  • Our street puts on a carnival every year.我们街的居民每年举行一次嘉年华会。
83 incapable w9ZxK     
adj.无能力的,不能做某事的
参考例句:
  • He would be incapable of committing such a cruel deed.他不会做出这么残忍的事。
  • Computers are incapable of creative thought.计算机不会创造性地思维。
84 lamented b6ae63144a98bc66c6a97351aea85970     
adj.被哀悼的,令人遗憾的v.(为…)哀悼,痛哭,悲伤( lament的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • her late lamented husband 她那令人怀念的已故的丈夫
  • We lamented over our bad luck. 我们为自己的不幸而悲伤。 来自《简明英汉词典》
85 lucid B8Zz8     
adj.明白易懂的,清晰的,头脑清楚的
参考例句:
  • His explanation was lucid and to the point.他的解释扼要易懂。
  • He wasn't very lucid,he didn't quite know where he was.他神志不是很清醒,不太知道自己在哪里。
86 solitude xF9yw     
n. 孤独; 独居,荒僻之地,幽静的地方
参考例句:
  • People need a chance to reflect on spiritual matters in solitude. 人们需要独处的机会来反思精神上的事情。
  • They searched for a place where they could live in solitude. 他们寻找一个可以过隐居生活的地方。
87 levitation levitation     
n.升空,漂浮;浮起
参考例句:
  • We are particularly interested in phenomena such as telepathy and levitation. 我们对心灵感应及空中漂浮这样的现象特别有兴趣。 来自辞典例句
  • This paper presents a magnetic levitation system control using the gain-scheduling controller. 本文以增益程序控制器针对磁浮系统进行控制。 来自互联网
88 celebrated iwLzpz     
adj.有名的,声誉卓著的
参考例句:
  • He was soon one of the most celebrated young painters in England.不久他就成了英格兰最负盛名的年轻画家之一。
  • The celebrated violinist was mobbed by the audience.观众团团围住了这位著名的小提琴演奏家。
89 extermination 46ce066e1bd2424a1ebab0da135b8ac6     
n.消灭,根绝
参考例句:
  • All door and window is sealed for the extermination of mosquito. 为了消灭蚊子,所有的门窗都被封闭起来了。 来自辞典例句
  • In doing so they were saved from extermination. 这样一来却使它们免于绝灭。 来自辞典例句
90 amazement 7zlzBK     
n.惊奇,惊讶
参考例句:
  • All those around him looked at him with amazement.周围的人都对他投射出惊异的眼光。
  • He looked at me in blank amazement.他带着迷茫惊诧的神情望着我。
91 tragic inaw2     
adj.悲剧的,悲剧性的,悲惨的
参考例句:
  • The effect of the pollution on the beaches is absolutely tragic.污染海滩后果可悲。
  • Charles was a man doomed to tragic issues.查理是个注定不得善终的人。
92 dissuade ksPxy     
v.劝阻,阻止
参考例句:
  • You'd better dissuade him from doing that.你最好劝阻他别那样干。
  • I tried to dissuade her from investing her money in stocks and shares.我曾设法劝她不要投资于股票交易。
93 automobile rP1yv     
n.汽车,机动车
参考例句:
  • He is repairing the brake lever of an automobile.他正在修理汽车的刹车杆。
  • The automobile slowed down to go around the curves in the road.汽车在路上转弯时放慢了速度。
94 convertible aZUyK     
adj.可改变的,可交换,同意义的;n.有活动摺篷的汽车
参考例句:
  • The convertible sofa means that the apartment can sleep four.有了这张折叠沙发,公寓里可以睡下4个人。
  • That new white convertible is totally awesome.那辆新的白色折篷汽车简直棒极了。
95 makeup 4AXxO     
n.组织;性格;化装品
参考例句:
  • Those who failed the exam take a makeup exam.这次考试不及格的人必须参加补考。
  • Do you think her beauty could makeup for her stupidity?你认为她的美丽能弥补她的愚蠢吗?
96 armistice ivoz9     
n.休战,停战协定
参考例句:
  • The two nations signed an armistice.两国签署了停火协议。
  • The Italian armistice is nothing but a clumsy trap.意大利的停战不过是一个笨拙的陷阱。
97 decorative bxtxc     
adj.装饰的,可作装饰的
参考例句:
  • This ware is suitable for decorative purpose but unsuitable for utility.这种器皿中看不中用。
  • The style is ornate and highly decorative.这种风格很华丽,而且装饰效果很好。
98 functionaries 90e939e920ac34596cdd9ccb420b61fe     
n.公职人员,官员( functionary的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • The Indian transmitters were court functionaries, not missionaries. 印度文化的传递者都是朝廷的官员而不是传教士。 来自辞典例句
  • All government institutions functionaries must implement state laws, decrees and policies. 所有政府机关极其工作人员都必须认真执行国家的法律,法规和政策。 来自互联网
99 dictatorial 3lAzp     
adj. 独裁的,专断的
参考例句:
  • Her father is very dictatorial.她父亲很专横。
  • For years the nation had been under the heel of a dictatorial regime.多年来这个国家一直在独裁政权的铁蹄下。
100 electrified 00d93691727e26ff4104e0c16b9bb258     
v.使电气化( electrify的过去式和过去分词 );使兴奋
参考例句:
  • The railway line was electrified in the 1950s. 这条铁路线在20世纪50年代就实现了电气化。
  • The national railway system has nearly all been electrified. 全国的铁路系统几乎全部实现了电气化。 来自《简明英汉词典》
101 countless 7vqz9L     
adj.无数的,多得不计其数的
参考例句:
  • In the war countless innocent people lost their lives.在这场战争中无数无辜的人丧失了性命。
  • I've told you countless times.我已经告诉你无数遍了。
102 discomforts 21153f1ed6fc87cfc0ae735005583b36     
n.不舒适( discomfort的名词复数 );不愉快,苦恼
参考例句:
  • Travellers in space have to endure many discomforts in their rockets. 宇宙旅行家不得不在火箭中忍受许多不舒适的东西 来自《用法词典》
  • On that particular morning even these discomforts added to my pleasure. 在那样一个特定的早晨,即使是这种种的不舒适也仿佛给我增添了满足感。 来自辞典例句
103 tormented b017cc8a8957c07bc6b20230800888d0     
饱受折磨的
参考例句:
  • The knowledge of his guilt tormented him. 知道了自己的罪责使他非常痛苦。
  • He had lain awake all night, tormented by jealousy. 他彻夜未眠,深受嫉妒的折磨。
104 pushcarts 3a56cfd264f8b65b8490d7dbd3ec7ded     
n.手推车( pushcart的名词复数 )
参考例句:
105 barbarian nyaz13     
n.野蛮人;adj.野蛮(人)的;未开化的
参考例句:
  • There is a barbarian tribe living in this forest.有一个原始部落居住在这个林区。
  • The walled city was attacked by barbarian hordes.那座有城墙的城市遭到野蛮部落的袭击。
106 stentorian 1uCwA     
adj.大声的,响亮的
参考例句:
  • Now all joined in solemn stentorian accord.现在,在这庄严的响彻云霄的和声中大家都联合在一起了。
  • The stentorian tones of auctioneer,calling out to clear,now announced that the sale to commence.拍卖人用洪亮的声音招呼大家闪开一点,然后宣布拍卖即将开始。
107 gust q5Zyu     
n.阵风,突然一阵(雨、烟等),(感情的)迸发
参考例句:
  • A gust of wind blew the front door shut.一阵大风吹来,把前门关上了。
  • A gust of happiness swept through her.一股幸福的暖流流遍她的全身。
108 eyebrows a0e6fb1330e9cfecfd1c7a4d00030ed5     
眉毛( eyebrow的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Eyebrows stop sweat from coming down into the eyes. 眉毛挡住汗水使其不能流进眼睛。
  • His eyebrows project noticeably. 他的眉毛特别突出。
109 corpses 2e7a6f2b001045a825912208632941b2     
n.死尸,尸体( corpse的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • The living soldiers put corpses together and burned them. 活着的战士把尸体放在一起烧了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Overhead, grayish-white clouds covered the sky, piling up heavily like decaying corpses. 天上罩满了灰白的薄云,同腐烂的尸体似的沉沉的盖在那里。 来自汉英文学 - 中国现代小说
110 ledger 014xk     
n.总帐,分类帐;帐簿
参考例句:
  • The young man bowed his head and bent over his ledger again.那个年轻人点头应诺,然后又埋头写起分类帐。
  • She is a real accountant who even keeps a detailed household ledger.她不愧是搞财务的,家庭分类账记得清楚详细。
111 eldest bqkx6     
adj.最年长的,最年老的
参考例句:
  • The King's eldest son is the heir to the throne.国王的长子是王位的继承人。
  • The castle and the land are entailed on the eldest son.城堡和土地限定由长子继承。
112 labyrinth h9Fzr     
n.迷宫;难解的事物;迷路
参考例句:
  • He wandered through the labyrinth of the alleyways.他在迷宫似的小巷中闲逛。
  • The human mind is a labyrinth.人的心灵是一座迷宫。
113 investigation MRKzq     
n.调查,调查研究
参考例句:
  • In an investigation,a new fact became known, which told against him.在调查中新发现了一件对他不利的事实。
  • He drew the conclusion by building on his own investigation.他根据自己的调查研究作出结论。
114 homage eQZzK     
n.尊敬,敬意,崇敬
参考例句:
  • We pay homage to the genius of Shakespeare.我们对莎士比亚的天才表示敬仰。
  • The soldiers swore to pay their homage to the Queen.士兵们宣誓效忠于女王陛下。
115 coffins 44894d235713b353f49bf59c028ff750     
n.棺材( coffin的名词复数 );使某人早亡[死,完蛋,垮台等]之物
参考例句:
  • The shop was close and hot, and the atmosphere seemed tainted with the smell of coffins. 店堂里相当闷热,空气仿佛被棺木的味儿污染了。 来自辞典例句
  • Donate some coffins to the temple, equal to the number of deaths. 到寺庙里,捐赠棺材盒给这些死者吧。 来自电影对白
116 decrepit A9lyt     
adj.衰老的,破旧的
参考例句:
  • The film had been shot in a decrepit old police station.该影片是在一所破旧不堪的警察局里拍摄的。
  • A decrepit old man sat on a park bench.一个衰弱的老人坐在公园的长凳上。
117 interpretations a61815f6fe8955c9d235d4082e30896b     
n.解释( interpretation的名词复数 );表演;演绎;理解
参考例句:
  • This passage is open to a variety of interpretations. 这篇文章可以有各种不同的解释。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The involved and abstruse passage makes several interpretations possible. 这段艰涩的文字可以作出好几种解释。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
118 goblet S66yI     
n.高脚酒杯
参考例句:
  • He poured some wine into the goblet.他向高脚酒杯里倒了一些葡萄酒。
  • He swirled the brandy around in the huge goblet.他摇晃着高脚大玻璃杯使里面的白兰地酒旋动起来。
119 penetrated 61c8e5905df30b8828694a7dc4c3a3e0     
adj. 击穿的,鞭辟入里的 动词penetrate的过去式和过去分词形式
参考例句:
  • The knife had penetrated his chest. 刀子刺入了他的胸膛。
  • They penetrated into territory where no man had ever gone before. 他们已进入先前没人去过的地区。
120 ashen JNsyS     
adj.灰的
参考例句:
  • His face was ashen and wet with sweat.他面如土色,汗如雨下。
  • Her ashen face showed how much the news had shocked her.她灰白的脸显示出那消息使她多么震惊。
121 futilely 01e150160a877e2134559fc0dcaf18c3     
futile(无用的)的变形; 干
参考例句:
  • Hitler, now ashen-gray, futilely strained at his chains. 希特勒这时面如死灰,无可奈何地死拽住身上的锁链不放。 来自名作英译部分
  • Spinning futilely at first, the drivers of the engine at last caught the rails. 那机车的主动轮起先转了一阵也没有用处,可到底咬住了路轨啦。
122 omens 4fe4cb32de8b61bd4b8036d574e4f48a     
n.前兆,预兆( omen的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • The omens for the game are still not propitious. 这场比赛仍不被看好。 来自辞典例句
  • Such omens betide no good. 这种征兆预示情况不妙。 来自辞典例句
123 vestige 3LNzg     
n.痕迹,遗迹,残余
参考例句:
  • Some upright stones in wild places are the vestige of ancient religions.荒原上一些直立的石块是古老宗教的遗迹。
  • Every vestige has been swept away.一切痕迹都被一扫而光。
124 rubble 8XjxP     
n.(一堆)碎石,瓦砾
参考例句:
  • After the earthquake,it took months to clean up the rubble.地震后,花了数月才清理完瓦砾。
  • After the war many cities were full of rubble.战后许多城市到处可见颓垣残壁。
125 prospered ce2c414688e59180b21f9ecc7d882425     
成功,兴旺( prosper的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • The organization certainly prospered under his stewardship. 不可否认,这个组织在他的管理下兴旺了起来。
  • Mr. Black prospered from his wise investments. 布莱克先生由于巧妙的投资赚了不少钱。
126 chestnut XnJy8     
n.栗树,栗子
参考例句:
  • We have a chestnut tree in the bottom of our garden.我们的花园尽头有一棵栗树。
  • In summer we had tea outdoors,under the chestnut tree.夏天我们在室外栗树下喝茶。
127 covet 8oLz0     
vt.垂涎;贪图(尤指属于他人的东西)
参考例句:
  • We do not covet anything from any nation.我们不觊觎任何国家的任何东西。
  • Many large companies covet these low-cost acquisition of troubled small companies.许多大公司都觊觎低价收购这些陷入困境的小公司。
128 mere rC1xE     
adj.纯粹的;仅仅,只不过
参考例句:
  • That is a mere repetition of what you said before.那不过是重复了你以前讲的话。
  • It's a mere waste of time waiting any longer.再等下去纯粹是浪费时间。
129 perseverance oMaxH     
n.坚持不懈,不屈不挠
参考例句:
  • It may take some perseverance to find the right people.要找到合适的人也许需要有点锲而不舍的精神。
  • Perseverance leads to success.有恒心就能胜利。
130 sneaking iibzMu     
a.秘密的,不公开的
参考例句:
  • She had always had a sneaking affection for him. 以前她一直暗暗倾心于他。
  • She ducked the interviewers by sneaking out the back door. 她从后门偷偷溜走,躲开采访者。
131 ailing XzzzbA     
v.生病
参考例句:
  • They discussed the problems ailing the steel industry. 他们讨论了困扰钢铁工业的问题。
  • She looked after her ailing father. 她照顾有病的父亲。
132 strings nh0zBe     
n.弦
参考例句:
  • He sat on the bed,idly plucking the strings of his guitar.他坐在床上,随意地拨着吉他的弦。
  • She swept her fingers over the strings of the harp.她用手指划过竖琴的琴弦。
133 humiliation Jd3zW     
n.羞辱
参考例句:
  • He suffered the humiliation of being forced to ask for his cards.他蒙受了被迫要求辞职的羞辱。
  • He will wish to revenge his humiliation in last Season's Final.他会为在上个季度的决赛中所受的耻辱而报复的。
134 entreaties d56c170cf2a22c1ecef1ae585b702562     
n.恳求,乞求( entreaty的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He began with entreaties and ended with a threat. 他先是恳求,最后是威胁。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The tyrant was deaf to the entreaties of the slaves. 暴君听不到奴隶们的哀鸣。 来自《简明英汉词典》
135 corrosive wzsxn     
adj.腐蚀性的;有害的;恶毒的
参考例句:
  • Many highly corrosive substances are used in the nuclear industry.核工业使用许多腐蚀性很强的物质。
  • Many highly corrosive substances are used in the nuclear industry.核工业使用许多腐蚀性很强的物质。
136 miserable g18yk     
adj.悲惨的,痛苦的;可怜的,糟糕的
参考例句:
  • It was miserable of you to make fun of him.你取笑他,这是可耻的。
  • Her past life was miserable.她过去的生活很苦。
137 anonymous lM2yp     
adj.无名的;匿名的;无特色的
参考例句:
  • Sending anonymous letters is a cowardly act.寄匿名信是懦夫的行为。
  • The author wishes to remain anonymous.作者希望姓名不公开。
138 likeness P1txX     
n.相像,相似(之处)
参考例句:
  • I think the painter has produced a very true likeness.我认为这位画家画得非常逼真。
  • She treasured the painted likeness of her son.她珍藏她儿子的画像。
139 gunpowder oerxm     
n.火药
参考例句:
  • Gunpowder was introduced into Europe during the first half of the 14th century.在14世纪上半叶,火药传入欧洲。
  • This statement has a strong smell of gunpowder.这是一篇充满火药味的声明。
140 exquisite zhez1     
adj.精美的;敏锐的;剧烈的,感觉强烈的
参考例句:
  • I was admiring the exquisite workmanship in the mosaic.我当时正在欣赏镶嵌画的精致做工。
  • I still remember the exquisite pleasure I experienced in Bali.我依然记得在巴厘岛所经历的那种剧烈的快感。
141 conflagration CnZyK     
n.建筑物或森林大火
参考例句:
  • A conflagration in 1947 reduced 90 percent of the houses to ashes.1947年的一场大火,使90%的房屋化为灰烬。
  • The light of that conflagration will fade away.这熊熊烈火会渐渐熄灭。
142 vestiges abe7c965ff1797742478ada5aece0ed3     
残余部分( vestige的名词复数 ); 遗迹; 痕迹; 毫不
参考例句:
  • the last vestiges of the old colonial regime 旧殖民制度最后的残余
  • These upright stones are the vestiges of some ancient religion. 这些竖立的石头是某种古代宗教的遗迹。
143 corruption TzCxn     
n.腐败,堕落,贪污
参考例句:
  • The people asked the government to hit out against corruption and theft.人民要求政府严惩贪污盗窃。
  • The old man reviled against corruption.那老人痛斥了贪污舞弊。
144 invader RqzzMm     
n.侵略者,侵犯者,入侵者
参考例句:
  • They suffered a lot under the invader's heel.在侵略者的铁蹄下,他们受尽了奴役。
  • A country must have the will to repel any invader.一个国家得有决心击退任何入侵者。
145 compassion 3q2zZ     
n.同情,怜悯
参考例句:
  • He could not help having compassion for the poor creature.他情不自禁地怜悯起那个可怜的人来。
  • Her heart was filled with compassion for the motherless children.她对于没有母亲的孩子们充满了怜悯心。


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