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Chapter 27 Literary Lessons
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Fortune suddenly smiled upon Jo, and dropped a good luck penny in her path. Not a golden penny, exactly, but I doubt if half a million would have given more real happiness then did the little sum that came to her in this wise.

Every few weeks she would shut herself up in her room, put on her scribbling1 suit, and 'fall into a vortex', as she expressed it, writing away at her novel with all her heart and soul, for till that was finished she could find no peace. Her 'scribbling suit' consisted of a black woolen2 pinafore on which she could wipe her pen at will, and a cap of the same material, adorned3 with a cheerful red bow, into which she bundled her hair when the decks were cleared for action. This cap was a beacon4 to the inquiring eyes of her family, who during these periods kept their distance, merely popping in their heads semi-occasionally to ask, with interest, "Does genius burn, Jo?" They did not always venture even to ask this question, but took an observation of the cap, and judged accordingly. If this expressive5 article of dress was drawn6 low upon the forehead, it was a sign that hard work was going on, in exciting moments it was pushed rakishly askew7, and when despair seized the author it was plucked wholly off, and cast upon the floor. At such times the intruder silently withdrew, and not until the red bow was seen gaily8 erect9 upon the gifted brow, did anyone dare address Jo.

She did not think herself a genius by any means, but when the writing fit came on, she gave herself up to it with entire abandon, and led a blissful life, unconscious of want, care, or bad weather, while she sat safe and happy in an imaginary world, full of friends almost as real and dear to her as any in the flesh. Sleep forsook10 her eyes, meals stood untasted, day and night were all too short to enjoy the happiness which blessed her only at such times, and made these hours worth living, even if they bore no other fruit. The devine afflatus11 usually lasted a week or two, and then she emerged from her 'vortex', hungry, sleepy, cross, or despondent12.

She was just recovering from one of these attacks when she was prevailed upon to escort Miss Crocker to a lecture, and in return for her virtue13 was rewarded with a new idea. It was a People's Course, the lecture on the Pyramids, and Jo rather wondered at the choice of such a subject for such an audience, but took it for granted that some great social evil would be remedied or some great want supplied by unfolding the glories of the Pharaohs to an audience whose thoughts were busy with the price of coal and flour, and whose lives were spent in trying to solve harder riddles14 than that of the Sphinx.

They were early, and while Miss Crocker set the heel of her stocking, Jo amused herself by examining the faces of the people who occupied the seat with them. On her left were two matrons, with massive foreheads and bonnets15 to match, discussing Women's Rights and making tatting. Beyond sat a pair of humble16 lovers, artlessly holding each other by the hand, a somber17 spinster eating peppermints18 out of a paper bag, and an old gentleman taking his preparatory nap behind a yellow bandanna19. On her right, her only neighbor was a studious looking lad absorbed in a newspaper.

It was a pictorial20 sheet, and Jo examined the work of art nearest her, idly wondering what fortuitous concatenation of circumstances needed the melodramatic illustration of an Indian in full war costume, tumbling over a precipice21 with a wolf at his throat, while two infuriated young gentlemen, with unnaturally23 small feet and big eyes, were stabbing each other close by, and a disheveled female was flying away in the background with her mouth wide open. Pausing to turn a page, the lad saw her looking and, with boyish good nature offered half his paper, saying bluntly, "want to read it? That's a first-rate story."

Jo accepted it with a smile, for she had never outgrown24 her liking25 for lads, and soon found herself involved in the usual labyrinth26 of love, mystery, and murder, for the story belonged to that class of light literature in which the passions have a holiday, and when the author's invention fails, a grand catastrophe27 clears the stage of one half the dramatis personae, leaving the other half to exult28 over their downfall.

"Prime, isn't it?" asked the boy, as her eye went down the last paragraph of her portion.

"I think you and I could do as well as that if we tried," returned Jo, amused at his admiration29 of the trash.

"I should think I was a pretty lucky chap if I could. She makes a good living out of such stories, they say." and he pointed30 to the name of Mrs. S.L.A.N.G. Northbury, under the title of the tale.

"Do you know her?" asked Jo, with sudden interest.

"No, but I read all her pieces, and I know a fellow who works in the office where this paper is printed."

"Do you say she makes a good living out of stories like this?" and Jo looked more respectfully at the agitated31 group and thickly sprinkled exclamation32 points that adorned the page.

"Guess she does! She knows just what folks like, and gets paid well for writing it."

Here the lecture began, but Jo heard very little of it, for while Professor Sands was prosing away about Belzoni, Cheops, scarabei, and hieroglyphics33, she was covertly34 taking down the address of the paper, and boldly resolving to try for the hundred-dollar prize offered in its columns for a sensational35 story. By the time the lecture ended and the audience awoke, she had built up a splendid fortune for herself (not the first founded on paper), and was already deep in the concoction36 of her story, being unable to decide whether the duel37 should come before the elopement or after the murder.

She said nothing of her plan at home, but fell to work next day, much to the disquiet38 of her mother, who always looked a little anxious when 'genius took to burning'. Jo had never tried this style before, contenting herself with very mild romances for _The Spread Eagle_. Her experience and miscellaneous reading were of service now, for they gave her some idea of dramatic effect, and supplied plot, language, and costumes. Her story was as full of desperation and despair as her limited acquaintance with those uncomfortable emotions enabled her to make it, and having located it in Lisbon, she wound up with an earthquake, as a striking and appropriate denouement39. The manuscript was privately40 dispatched, accompanied by a note, modestly saying that if the tale didn't get the prize, which the writer hardly dared expect, she would be very glad to receive any sum it might be considered worth.

Six weeks is a long time to wait, and a still longer time for a girl to keep a secret, but Jo did both, and was just beginning to give up all hope of ever seeing her manuscript again, when a letter arrived which almost took her breath away, for on opening it, a check for a hundred dollars fell into her lap. For a minute she stared at it as if it had been a snake, then she read her letter and began to cry. If the amiable41 gentleman who wrote that kindly42 note could have known what intense happiness he was giving a fellow creature, I think he would devote his leisure hours, if he has any, to that amusement, for Jo valued the letter more than the money, because it was encouraging, and after years of effort it was so pleasant to find that she had learned to do something, though it was only to write a sensation story.

A prouder young woman was seldom seen than she, when, having composed herself, she electrified43 the family by appearing before them with the letter in one hand, the check in the other, announcing that she had won the prize. Of course there was a great jubilee44, and when the story came everyone read and praised it, though after her father had told her that the language was good, the romance fresh and hearty45, and the tragedy quite thrilling, he shook his head, and said in his unworldly way . . .

"You can do better than this, Jo. Aim at the highest, and never mind the money."

"I think the money is the best part of it. What will you do with such a fortune?" asked Amy, regarding the magic slip of paper with a reverential eye.

"Send Beth and Mother to the seaside for a month or two," answered Jo promptly46.

To the seaside they went, after much discussion, and though Beth didn't come home as plump and rosy47 as could be desired, she was much better, while Mrs. March declared she felt ten years younger. So Jo was satisfied with the investment of her prize money, and fell to work with a cheery spirit, bent48 on earning more of those delightful49 checks. She did earn several that year, and began to feel herself a power in the house, for by the magic of a pen, her 'rubbish' turned into comforts for them all. The Duke's Daughter paid the butcher's bill, A Phantom50 Hand put down a new carpet, and the Curse of the Coventrys proved the blessing51 of the Marches in the way of groceries and gowns.

Wealth is certainly a most desirable thing, but poverty has its sunny side, and one of the sweet uses of adversity is the genuine satisfaction which comes from hearty work of head or hand, and to the inspiration of necessity, we owe half the wise, beautiful, and useful blessings52 of the world. Jo enjoyed a taste of this satisfaction, and ceased to envy richer girls, taking great comfort in the knowledge that she could supply her own wants, and need ask no one for a penny.

Little notice was taken of her stories, but they found a market, and encouraged by this fact, she resolved to make a bold stroke for fame and fortune. Having copied her novel for the fourth time, read it to all her confidential53 friends, and submitted it with fear and trembling to three publishers, she at last disposed of it, on condition that she would cut it down one third, and omit all the parts which she particularly admired.

"Now I must either bundle it back in to my tin kitchen to mold, pay for printing it myself, or chop it up to suit purchasers and get what I can for it. Fame is a very good thing to have in the house, but cash is more convenient, so I wish to take the sense of the meeting on this important subject," said Jo, calling a family council.

"Don't spoil your book, my girl, for there is more in it than you know, and the idea is well worked out. Let it wait and ripen54," was her father's advice, and he practiced what he preached, having waited patiently thirty years for fruit of his own to ripen, and being in no haste to gather it even now when it was sweet and mellow55.

"It seems to me that Jo will profit more by taking the trial than by waiting," said Mrs. March. "Criticism is the best test of such work, for it will show her both unsuspected merits and faults, and help her to do better next time. We are too partial, but the praise and blame of outsiders will prove useful, even if she gets but little money."

"Yes," said Jo, knitting her brows, "that's just it. I've been fussing over the thing so long, I really don't know whether it's good, bad, or indifferent. It will be a great help to have cool, impartial56 persons take a look at it, and tell me what they think of it."

"I wouldn't leave a word out of it. You'll spoil it if you do, for the interest of the story is more in the minds than in the actions of the people, and it will be all a muddle57 if you don't explain as you go on," said Meg, who firmly believed that this book was the most remarkable58 novel ever written.

"But Mr. Allen says, 'Leave out the explanations, make it brief and dramatic, and let the characters tell the story'," interrupted Jo, turning to the publisher's note.

"Do as he tells you. He knows what will sell, and we don't. Make a good, popular book, and get as much money as you can. By-and-by, when you've got a name, you can afford to digress, and have philosophical59 and metaphysical people in your novels," said Amy, who took a strictly60 practical view of the subject.

"Well," said Jo, laughing, "if my people are 'philosophical and metaphysical', it isn't my fault, for I know nothing about such things, except what I hear father say, sometimes. If I've got some of his wise ideas jumbled61 up with my romance, so much the better for me. Now, Beth, what do you say?"

"I should so like to see it printed soon," was all Beth said, and smiled in saying it. But there was an unconscious emphasis on the last word, and a wistful look in the eyes that never lost their childlike candor62, which chilled Jo's heart for a minute with a forboding fear, and decided63 her to make her little venture 'soon'.

So, with Spartan64 firmness, the young authoress laid her first-born on her table, and chopped it up as ruthlessly as any ogre. In the hope of pleasing everyone, she took everyone's advice, and like the old man and his donkey in the fable65 suited nobody.

Her father liked the metaphysical streak66 which had unconsciously got into it, so that was allowed to remain though she had her doubts about it. Her mother thought that there was a trifle too much description. Out, therefore it came, and with it many necessary links in the story. Meg admired the tragedy, so Jo piled up the agony to suit her, while Amy objected to the fun, and, with the best intentions in life, Jo quenched67 the spritly scenes which relieved the somber character of the story. Then, to complicate68 the ruin, she cut it down one third, and confidingly69 sent the poor little romance, like a picked robin70, out into the big, busy world to try its fate.

Well, it was printed, and she got three hundred dollars for it, likewise plenty of praise and blame, both so much greater than she expected that she was thrown into a state of bewilderment from which it took her some time to recover.

"You said, Mother, that criticism would help me. But how can it, when it's so contradictory71 that I don't know whether I've written a promising72 book or broken all the ten commandments?" cried poor Jo, turning over a heap of notices, the perusal73 of which filled her with pride and joy one minute, wrath74 and dismay the next. "This man says, 'An exquisite75 book, full of truth, beauty, and earnestness.' 'All is sweet, pure, and healthy.'" continued the perplexed76 authoress. "The next, 'The theory of the book is bad, full of morbid77 fancies, spiritualistic ideas, and unnatural22 characters.' Now, as I had no theory of any kind, don't believe in Spiritualism, and copied my characters from life, I don't see how this critic can be right. Another says, 'It's one of the best American novels which has appeared for years.' (I know better than that), and the next asserts that 'Though it is original, and written with great force and feeling, it is a dangerous book.' 'Tisn't! Some make fun of it, some overpraise, and nearly all insist that I had a deep theory to expound78, when I only wrote it for the pleasure and the money. I wish I'd printed the whole or not at all, for I do hate to be so misjudged."

Her family and friends administered comfort and commendation liberally. Yet it was a hard time for sensitive, high-spirited Jo, who meant so well and had apparently79 done so ill. But it did her good, for those whose opinion had real value gave her the criticism which is an author's best education, and when the first soreness was over, she could laugh at her poor little book, yet believe in it still, and feel herself the wiser and stronger for the buffeting80 she had received.

"Not being a genius, like Keats, it won't kill me," she said stoutly81, "and I've got the joke on my side, after all, for the parts that were taken straight out of real life are denounced as impossible and absurd, and the scenes that I made up out of my own silly head are pronounced 'charmingly natural, tender, and true'. So I'll comfort myself with that, and when I'm ready, I'll up again and take another."

 

乔突然交上了好运,她的生活道路上落下了幸运钱币。尽管未必是金币,但我怀疑五十万块钱也换不来她以这种方式得到的一小笔钱所带给她的快乐。

每隔几星期,她就把自己关在屋里,穿上她的涂抹工作服,像她自己说的,“掉进漩涡",一门心思地写起小说来。小说一天没写完,她就一天不得安宁,她的"涂抹服"是一条黑色的羊毛围裙,可以随意在上面擦拭钢笔。还有一顶同样质地的帽子,上面装饰着一个怡人的红蝴蝶结,一旦准备动手写作,她便把头发束进蝴蝶结里。在家人好奇的眼里,这顶帽子是个信号,在乔写作的这段时间里,她们离她远远的,只是偶尔饶有兴趣地伸头探问:“乔,来灵感了吗?”即便这样,她们也不敢贸然发问,只是观察帽子的动静,并由此作出判断。若是这个富有表现力的服饰低低地压在前额,那表明她正在苦苦思索;写到激动时,帽子便时髦地斜戴着;文思枯竭时,帽子便给扯下来了。在这种时刻,谁闯进屋子都得默然而退,不到那天才的额头上竖起欢快的蝴蝶结,谁也不敢和乔说话。

她根本不把自己看作天才,然而一旦来了写作冲动,她便全部身心投入进去。她活得极快乐,一旦坐下来进入她的想象世界,便感到平安、幸福 -在那里有许多和现实生活中一样亲切的、活生生的朋友,令她意识不到贫困、忧虑,甚至糟糕的天气。她废寝忘食,因为享受这种快乐的时光太短了,而只有在这个时候,她才感到幸福,感到活得有意义,尽管这段时间她没做出别的什么。这种天才的灵感通常要持续一两个星期,然后,她从她的"漩涡"里冒出头来,又饿又困,脾气暴躁,要么便心灰意懒。

有一回,她刚从这样的一次发作中恢复过来,便被劝说陪伴克罗克小姐去听一个讲座。作为对她善行的回报,这次听课使她产生了个新想法。这是为教徒开的课程,讲座是关于金字塔的。乔弄不清为什么对这样的听众选这样的主题。可她想当然地认定,这些满脑子想着煤炭、面粉价格的听众们,成日里要解开的谜比斯芬克司提出的更难,对他们展示法老们的荣耀,能够大大减少社会的弊端,满足他们贪婪的欲求。

她们去早了。乘克罗克小姐调正长统袜跟的时候,乔打量着坐在她们周围的人们的面孔,以此消遣。她的左边坐着两个家庭主妇,硕大的额头配着宽大的帽子。她们一边编着织物,一边讨论着妇女权利问题。再过去,坐着一对谦恭的情人,毫不掩饰地手拉着手;一个忧郁的老处女正从纸袋里拿薄荷糖吃;一个老先生盖着黄头巾打盹,作好听课准备。乔的右边,她唯一的邻座是个看上去很好学的小伙子,正在专心地读着报纸。

那是张画报,乔观赏着靠近她一面的艺术画儿。画面上,一个身着全套战服的印第安人跌倒在悬岩边,一只狼正扑向她的咽喉。附近两位愤怒的年轻绅士正在互相厮杀,他俩的脚小得出奇,眼睛却大得出奇。背景中一个披头散发的女人大张着嘴正奔跑着想逃开。乔悠闲地想着到底是怎样一种不幸的事件,需要如此夸张地渲染。小伙子停下来翻画页时,见乔也在看,便递给她半张,直率地说:“想看看?那可是一流的故事。”乔微笑着接过来,她喜欢小伙子们,年龄增长也改变不了。很快乔就埋头干这类故事常有的错综复杂的爱情情节、神秘事件和凶杀中去了。这个故事属于那种热情奔放的通俗文学。当作家智穷力竭时,便来一场大灾难,去掉舞台上一半的剧中人物,让那另一半人物为这些人的覆灭幸灾乐祸。

“棒极了,是不是?”小伙子问。乔还在扫视着这半张报纸的最后一段。

“我看,假如要写的话,你我同样能写这么好,”乔回答道,她为小伙子赞赏这种无聊的作品感到可笑。

“要是我能写的话,就太幸运了。听说她写这种故事赚了很多钱。”他指着故事标题下的姓名,S.L.A.N.G.诺思布里夫人。

“你认识她?”乔突然来了兴趣。

“不,她的作品我都读过。我认识的一个朋友就在印这份报纸的地方工作。”“你是说她写这种故事赚了很多钱?”乔看着布满报纸的惊叹号和令人揪心的这几个人,有些起敬了。

“我想是的!她晓得人们爱看什么,写这些能赚好多钱。”这时,讲座开始了,乔几乎一个字都没听进去。当桑兹教授啰啰嗦嗦地讲贝尔佐尼、基奥普斯、圣甲虫雕饰物和象形文字时,她偷偷摸摸地抄下了报纸的地址。报纸征集轰动一时的故事,并提供一百美元的奖金。乔决心大胆一试。等到讲座结束,听众醒来时,她已为自己积聚了一笔可观的财富(这不是第一次从报纸上挣的)。她沉浸在故事的策划中,只是拿不定决斗场面放在私奔前还是放在谋杀后。

回到家,她只字没提她的计划。第二天立即开始工作,这使妈妈非常不安,因为,”天才冒火花"时,妈妈看上去总是有点焦虑。乔以前从未写过这种风格的东西,为《展翼鹰》报写这种非常柔和的浪漫传奇,她洋洋自得。她的戏剧表演经验和广博的阅读现在派上了用场,这使她掌握了一些戏剧效果,并为她提供了情节、语言及服装。她的故事里充满了绝望和沮丧,因为她有限的几个熟人中有着这种使人非常难受的情绪,她也就在故事里予以体现。故事的场景设在里斯本,以一场地震结束,这样的结局出人意料,却又合情合理。她悄悄地寄走了手稿,并附上便条,谦虚地声称如果中不了奖,这故事值多少钱就给她多少钱,她会很高兴的。她没敢想过中奖。

六个月的等待是很长的一段时间,一个女孩子要保密,六个月就显得更长了。但是,乔既等了,又守住了秘密。她开始放弃再见到手稿的希望了。这时,来了一封信,使她人吃一惊。因为,一打开信封,一张一百元支票便落在了她的膝盖上。有那么一会儿,她盯着支票看,好像那是条蛇。然后,她读了信,哭了起来,假如那位可爱的先生早知道他写的这样一封客套信会给他的同胞带来这样强烈的幸福,我想,他一有空闲时间,便会全用来写信了。乔把那封信看得比钱还重,因为信给了他鼓励,而且在多年努力之后,终于发现自己学会了某些事情,真让她高兴,尽管只写了个有点耸人听闻的故事。

当乔平静下来后,一手拿着信,一手拿着支票,出现在家人面前,宣布她已获奖的时候,人们很难见到比乔更得意的年轻女人了。全家人一下子震惊不已,当然更少不了狂欢庆祝。故事发出来后,每个人都读了,并大加赞赏。爸爸对她说,故事语言不错,爱情表现得生动、热烈,悲剧扣人心弦。然后他超然地摆着头说 “你能写点更好的东西,乔。瞄准最高的目标,千万别去在乎钱。”“我倒是觉得这件事最好的部分是钱。这么多钱你将怎么花呢?”艾美虔诚地看着这张具有魔力的支票问道。

“送贝思和妈妈到海边过一两个月,”乔即刻回答。

“啊,太妙了!不,我不能去,亲爱的,那样太自私了,”贝思叫了起来。她拍了拍纤弱的手,深吸了口气,好像渴望着新鲜的海风,然后停下来,推开了姐姐在她面前挥动的支票。

“哦,你得去,就这么定了。我写故事就为这个,因此才会成功。我只想着自己时,从来干不好事情,你看,为写作挣钱也成全了我自己,对吗?而且,妈咪也需要换换空气,她不会丢开你,所以你一定得去。等你长胖了回来,面色红润,那该多好!乔医生万岁!她总能治好她的病人!”反复讨论后,她们终于去了海边。回来时尽管贝思没有像希望的那样长胖,面色变红,但身体感觉好多了。而马奇太太声称她感到年轻了十岁。因此,乔对她的奖金投资很满意,情绪饱满地又开始写作,一心要多挣些令人愉快的支票。

那一年,她确实挣了不少,并开始意识到自己在家中的分量。

因为通过笔的魔力,她的"废话"使全家人过得很舒适。《公爵之女》付了买肉钱,《幽灵的手》铺下了一条新地毯,《考文垂的咒语》让马奇一家过上了丰衣足食的小康生活。

财富的确是人们非常渴望的,然而贫穷也有它光明的一面。逆境的好处之一是人们从自己艰苦卓绝的奋斗中感到真正的愉快。我们存在于世间的智慧、美丽与能力,有一半得之于困境的激励。乔沉醉于这种愉快的感觉中,不再羡慕那些有钱的女孩。她知道她能不向别人要一分钱而为自己提供需要的一切,从中她获得巨大的安慰。

小说并未引起多大的注意,但销路不错。她为之鼓舞,决心为名利大胆一搏。她把小说抄了四遍,念给她所有的知心朋友听,怀着一颗惴惴不安的心寄给了三个出版商。小说终于被接受了,不过条件是得删去三分之一,其中还有那些自己最为得意的地方。

“现在,我必须要么把小说塞回我那蹩脚的灶间加工一下,然后自费出版;要么按出版商的要求将它删短,得我那一份钱。对这个家来说,出名声是件好事,可有钱更合宜,所以我想听听你们对这件大事的意见,”乔说着召开了家庭会议。

“别把书弄毁了,我的姑娘,这故事还有你没想到的含意,而且,故事构思得不错。放一放,等待时机成熟吧。”这是爸爸的建议,他躬行己言,三十多年来,一直耐心等待着自己人生的果实成熟,即使如今已瓜果飘香,他也并不急于收获。

“依我看,试一试比等待更有利,”马奇太太说道,”评论是这种事情最好的检验,能指出她未曾料到的价值和不足之处,促使她下次写得更好。我们的意见过于偏袒她,可是外人对她的褒贬会有用的,即使她得不到什么钱。”“是的。”乔皱起了眉头。”情况就是这样。这么长时间我一直忙着这个故事,我真的不知道它是好是坏,还是没有多大意思。让人不带偏见地谈一谈,告诉我他们的意见,将对我大有帮助。”“假如是我,一个字也不删,你要是删了就会毁了它。故事里面人物的思想比行动更让人感兴趣。如果一直写下去不加解释,会让人摸不着头脑,“梅格说,她坚持这是个最最出色的小说。

“可是艾伦先生说:'去掉解释,使故事简洁、戏剧化,让人物说故事。'"乔提起出版商的意见,打断了梅格。

“照他说的做,他知道什么有销路,我们却不知道。写本好的畅销书,尽可能地赚钱。渐渐地你就会有名气,就能够改变风格,写一些理性的、玄奥的人物,“艾美说,对这件事她的看法的确实用。

“喔,”乔说着笑起来,”要是我的人物是'理性的、玄奥的',那不是我的错,我对那些一窍不通,只是有时听爸爸谈起。要是我的传奇故事里能掺进些爸爸的博学思想,对我来说更好。哎,贝思,你怎么看?”“我就是希望故事快点印出来。“贝思笑着只说了这一句话,她无意中加重了"快点"这两个字的语气,眼神里流露出渴望。她的眼睛里总有一股孩子般的率真。听了她的话,乔心里一阵发冷,一种不祥的预感使她打定主意"快点"小试一番。

就这样,带着斯巴达式的吃苦耐劳精神,年轻的女作家将她的处女作放在桌上,像神话中的吃人妖魔一样不留情地开始大加删改。为了让家人高兴,每个人的意见她都采纳了,就像老人和驴那则寓言所说的那样,结果谁也不中意。

爸爸喜欢那作品无意带上的玄奥特色,因此,尽管乔有疑虑,还是保留了这些。妈妈认为描述部分确实多了些,就这么着,连同许多必要的环节,全给删掉了。梅格欣赏悲剧部分,所以乔大肆渲染痛苦以合她的心意。而艾美不赞成逗乐,乔便好心好意地扼杀了用来点缀故事中严肃人物的欢快场面。她还砍掉了故事的三分之一,就这样完全把它毁了。这个可怜的小传奇故事就像一只拔了毛的知更鸟,乔深信不疑地将它交付给热闹的大千世界去碰碰运气。

还不错,印出来了。乔得了三百美元,同时也得到了许多赞扬和批评。她没料到有这么多意见,一下陷入迷惑之中,好一段时间不能自拔。

“妈,你说过,评论能帮助我。可评论太矛盾了,搞得我不晓得到底是写了本挺不错的书,还是破了十诫,这样能帮我吗?”可怜的乔翻阅着一叠评论大声叫着。她时而充满自信、快乐,时而愤怒、沮丧。”这个人说:'一本绝妙的书,充满真善美。一切都那么美好、纯净、健康。'"困惑的女作家接着读,”下一个:'书的理论不好,满是令人毛骨悚然的幻想、精神主义至上的念头,以及怪异的人物。'你瞧我没有任何理论,我也不相信精神主义至上论,我的人物来自生活,我认为这个评论家怎也不能说是对。另一个这么说:'这是美国近年来出版的最杰出的小说之一'(我知道得更清楚);'再下一个断言:'这是本危险的书,尽管它内容新颖,写得有气势,有激情。'可不是嘛!一些人嘲笑它,一些人吹捧它,几乎所有的人都坚信我想阐述一种深奥的理论,可是我写它只是为了玩儿,为了钱。我真希望没删节全部印出来,不然不如不樱真讨厌被人误评。”家人和朋友们都极力劝慰她,可是对精神高尚、生性敏感的乔来说,这是件十分难受的事。她显然是好心却干出了错事。然而,这件事对她还是有益的,那些有价值的批评意见使作者受到了最好的教益,最初的难受劲过去后,她就能自嘲那本可怜的小书了,而且仍不乏自信。虽然遭受了打击,她感到自己更聪明、更有力了。

“我不是济慈那样的天才,但这又有何妨!”她勇敢地说,“毕竟,我也有笑他们的地方。我取材于现实生活的部分被贬毁为不可能,荒唐。而我傻脑袋里编出来的场景却被赞誉为'自然、温柔、真实,具有魅力'。所以,我可以用这些安慰自己。等我准备好了,我还会重整齐鼓,写些别的。”


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 scribbling 82fe3d42f37de6f101db3de98fc9e23d     
n.乱涂[写]胡[乱]写的文章[作品]v.潦草的书写( scribble的现在分词 );乱画;草草地写;匆匆记下
参考例句:
  • Once the money got into the book, all that remained were some scribbling. 折子上的钱只是几个字! 来自汉英文学 - 骆驼祥子
  • McMug loves scribbling. Mama then sent him to the Kindergarten. 麦唛很喜欢写字,妈妈看在眼里,就替他报读了幼稚园。 来自互联网
2 woolen 0fKw9     
adj.羊毛(制)的;毛纺的
参考例句:
  • She likes to wear woolen socks in winter.冬天她喜欢穿羊毛袜。
  • There is one bar of woolen blanket on that bed.那张床上有一条毛毯。
3 adorned 1e50de930eb057fcf0ac85ca485114c8     
[计]被修饰的
参考例句:
  • The walls were adorned with paintings. 墙上装饰了绘画。
  • And his coat was adorned with a flamboyant bunch of flowers. 他的外套上面装饰着一束艳丽刺目的鲜花。
4 beacon KQays     
n.烽火,(警告用的)闪火灯,灯塔
参考例句:
  • The blink of beacon could be seen for miles.灯塔的光亮在数英里之外都能看见。
  • The only light over the deep black sea was the blink shone from the beacon.黑黢黢的海面上唯一的光明就只有灯塔上闪现的亮光了。
5 expressive shwz4     
adj.表现的,表达…的,富于表情的
参考例句:
  • Black English can be more expressive than standard English.黑人所使用的英语可能比正式英语更有表现力。
  • He had a mobile,expressive,animated face.他有一张多变的,富于表情的,生动活泼的脸。
6 drawn MuXzIi     
v.拖,拉,拔出;adj.憔悴的,紧张的
参考例句:
  • All the characters in the story are drawn from life.故事中的所有人物都取材于生活。
  • Her gaze was drawn irresistibly to the scene outside.她的目光禁不住被外面的风景所吸引。
7 askew rvczG     
adv.斜地;adj.歪斜的
参考例句:
  • His glasses had been knocked askew by the blow.他的眼镜一下子被打歪了。
  • Her hat was slightly askew.她的帽子戴得有点斜。
8 gaily lfPzC     
adv.欢乐地,高兴地
参考例句:
  • The children sing gaily.孩子们欢唱着。
  • She waved goodbye very gaily.她欢快地挥手告别。
9 erect 4iLzm     
n./v.树立,建立,使竖立;adj.直立的,垂直的
参考例句:
  • She held her head erect and her back straight.她昂着头,把背挺得笔直。
  • Soldiers are trained to stand erect.士兵们训练站得笔直。
10 forsook 15e454d354d8a31a3863bce576df1451     
forsake的过去式
参考例句:
  • He faithlessly forsook his friends in their hour of need. 在最需要的时刻他背信弃义地抛弃朋友。
  • She forsook her worldly possessions to devote herself to the church. 她抛弃世上的财物而献身教会。
11 afflatus gN9zj     
n.灵感,神感
参考例句:
  • Carrie was now lightened by a touch of this divine afflatus.神圣的灵感使嘉莉变得神采奕奕。
  • Were did your afflatus come from?请问你的灵感是从那里来的?
12 despondent 4Pwzw     
adj.失望的,沮丧的,泄气的
参考例句:
  • He was up for a time and then,without warning,despondent again.他一度兴高采烈,但忽然又情绪低落下来。
  • I feel despondent when my work is rejected.作品被拒后我感到很沮丧。
13 virtue BpqyH     
n.德行,美德;贞操;优点;功效,效力
参考例句:
  • He was considered to be a paragon of virtue.他被认为是品德尽善尽美的典范。
  • You need to decorate your mind with virtue.你应该用德行美化心灵。
14 riddles 77f3ceed32609b0d80430e545f553e31     
n.谜(语)( riddle的名词复数 );猜不透的难题,难解之谜
参考例句:
  • Few riddles collected from oral tradition, however, have all six parts. 但是据收集的情况看,口头流传的谜语很少具有这完整的六部分。 来自英汉非文学 - 民俗
  • But first, you'd better see if you can answer riddles. 但是你首先最好想想你会不会猜谜语。 来自辞典例句
15 bonnets 8e4529b6df6e389494d272b2f3ae0ead     
n.童帽( bonnet的名词复数 );(烟囱等的)覆盖物;(苏格兰男子的)无边呢帽;(女子戴的)任何一种帽子
参考例句:
  • All the best bonnets of the city were there. 城里戴最漂亮的无边女帽的妇女全都到场了。 来自辞典例句
  • I am tempting you with bonnets and bangles and leading you into a pit. 我是在用帽子和镯子引诱你,引你上钩。 来自飘(部分)
16 humble ddjzU     
adj.谦卑的,恭顺的;地位低下的;v.降低,贬低
参考例句:
  • In my humble opinion,he will win the election.依我拙见,他将在选举中获胜。
  • Defeat and failure make people humble.挫折与失败会使人谦卑。
17 somber dFmz7     
adj.昏暗的,阴天的,阴森的,忧郁的
参考例句:
  • He had a somber expression on his face.他面容忧郁。
  • His coat was a somber brown.他的衣服是暗棕色的。
18 peppermints 0861208365c44aa8cacf6bdeab27fccd     
n.薄荷( peppermint的名词复数 );薄荷糖
参考例句:
  • She just curls up and sucks peppermints. 她老是蜷着腿躺着,吮着薄荷糖。 来自辞典例句
  • Enough, already with this mellow incense and peppermints vibe. 够了,我受够这些薰香以及薄荷的感觉了。 来自电影对白
19 bandanna BPQyF     
n.大手帕
参考例句:
  • He knotted the bandanna around his neck.他在脖子上系了一条印花大围巾。
  • He wiped his forehead with a blue bandanna and smiled again.他用一条蓝色的大手帕擦擦前额,又笑了笑。
20 pictorial PuWy6     
adj.绘画的;图片的;n.画报
参考例句:
  • The had insisted on a full pictorial coverage of the event.他们坚持要对那一事件做详尽的图片报道。
  • China Pictorial usually sells out soon after it hits the stands.《人民画报》往往一到报摊就销售一空。
21 precipice NuNyW     
n.悬崖,危急的处境
参考例句:
  • The hut hung half over the edge of the precipice.那间小屋有一半悬在峭壁边上。
  • A slight carelessness on this precipice could cost a man his life.在这悬崖上稍一疏忽就会使人丧生。
22 unnatural 5f2zAc     
adj.不自然的;反常的
参考例句:
  • Did her behaviour seem unnatural in any way?她有任何反常表现吗?
  • She has an unnatural smile on her face.她脸上挂着做作的微笑。
23 unnaturally 3ftzAP     
adv.违反习俗地;不自然地;勉强地;不近人情地
参考例句:
  • Her voice sounded unnaturally loud. 她的嗓音很响亮,但是有点反常。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Her eyes were unnaturally bright. 她的眼睛亮得不自然。 来自《简明英汉词典》
24 outgrown outgrown     
长[发展] 得超过(某物)的范围( outgrow的过去分词 ); 长[发展]得不能再要(某物); 长得比…快; 生长速度超过
参考例句:
  • She's already outgrown her school uniform. 她已经长得连校服都不能穿了。
  • The boy has outgrown his clothes. 这男孩已长得穿不下他的衣服了。
25 liking mpXzQ5     
n.爱好;嗜好;喜欢
参考例句:
  • The word palate also means taste or liking.Palate这个词也有“口味”或“嗜好”的意思。
  • I must admit I have no liking for exaggeration.我必须承认我不喜欢夸大其词。
26 labyrinth h9Fzr     
n.迷宫;难解的事物;迷路
参考例句:
  • He wandered through the labyrinth of the alleyways.他在迷宫似的小巷中闲逛。
  • The human mind is a labyrinth.人的心灵是一座迷宫。
27 catastrophe WXHzr     
n.大灾难,大祸
参考例句:
  • I owe it to you that I survived the catastrophe.亏得你我才大难不死。
  • This is a catastrophe beyond human control.这是一场人类无法控制的灾难。
28 exult lhBzC     
v.狂喜,欢腾;欢欣鼓舞
参考例句:
  • Few people would not exult at the abolition of slavery.奴隶制被废除了,人们无不为之欢乐鼓舞。
  • Let's exult with the children at the drawing near of Children's Day.六一儿童节到了,让我们陪着小朋友们一起欢腾。
29 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
30 pointed Il8zB4     
adj.尖的,直截了当的
参考例句:
  • He gave me a very sharp pointed pencil.他给我一支削得非常尖的铅笔。
  • She wished to show Mrs.John Dashwood by this pointed invitation to her brother.她想通过对达茨伍德夫人提出直截了当的邀请向她的哥哥表示出来。
31 agitated dzgzc2     
adj.被鼓动的,不安的
参考例句:
  • His answers were all mixed up,so agitated was he.他是那样心神不定,回答全乱了。
  • She was agitated because her train was an hour late.她乘坐的火车晚点一个小时,她十分焦虑。
32 exclamation onBxZ     
n.感叹号,惊呼,惊叹词
参考例句:
  • He could not restrain an exclamation of approval.他禁不住喝一声采。
  • The author used three exclamation marks at the end of the last sentence to wake up the readers.作者在文章的最后一句连用了三个惊叹号,以引起读者的注意。
33 hieroglyphics 875efb138c1099851d6647d532c0036f     
n.pl.象形文字
参考例句:
  • Hieroglyphics are carved into the walls of the temple. 寺庙的墙壁上刻着象形文字。
  • His writing is so bad it just looks like hieroglyphics to me. 他写的糟透了,对我来说就像天书一样。
34 covertly 9vgz7T     
adv.偷偷摸摸地
参考例句:
  • Naval organizations were covertly incorporated into civil ministries. 各种海军组织秘密地混合在各民政机关之中。 来自辞典例句
  • Modern terrorism is noteworthy today in that it is being done covertly. 现代的恐怖活动在今天是值得注意的,由于它是秘密进行的。 来自互联网
35 sensational Szrwi     
adj.使人感动的,非常好的,轰动的,耸人听闻的
参考例句:
  • Papers of this kind are full of sensational news reports.这类报纸满是耸人听闻的新闻报道。
  • Their performance was sensational.他们的演出妙极了。
36 concoction 8Ytyv     
n.调配(物);谎言
参考例句:
  • She enjoyed the concoction of foreign dishes.她喜欢调制外国菜。
  • His story was a sheer concoction.他的故事实在是一纯属捏造之事。
37 duel 2rmxa     
n./v.决斗;(双方的)斗争
参考例句:
  • The two teams are locked in a duel for first place.两个队为争夺第一名打得难解难分。
  • Duroy was forced to challenge his disparager to duel.杜洛瓦不得不向诋毁他的人提出决斗。
38 disquiet rtbxJ     
n.担心,焦虑
参考例句:
  • The disquiet will boil over in the long run.这种不安情绪终有一天会爆发的。
  • Her disquiet made us uneasy too.她的忧虑使我们也很不安。
39 denouement wwyxf     
n.结尾,结局
参考例句:
  • The book's sentimental denouement is pure Hollywood.该书的煽情结局纯粹是好莱坞式的。
  • In a surprising denouement,she becomes a nun.结局出人意表,她当修女了。
40 privately IkpzwT     
adv.以私人的身份,悄悄地,私下地
参考例句:
  • Some ministers admit privately that unemployment could continue to rise.一些部长私下承认失业率可能继续升高。
  • The man privately admits that his motive is profits.那人私下承认他的动机是为了牟利。
41 amiable hxAzZ     
adj.和蔼可亲的,友善的,亲切的
参考例句:
  • She was a very kind and amiable old woman.她是个善良和气的老太太。
  • We have a very amiable companionship.我们之间存在一种友好的关系。
42 kindly tpUzhQ     
adj.和蔼的,温和的,爽快的;adv.温和地,亲切地
参考例句:
  • Her neighbours spoke of her as kindly and hospitable.她的邻居都说她和蔼可亲、热情好客。
  • A shadow passed over the kindly face of the old woman.一道阴影掠过老太太慈祥的面孔。
43 electrified 00d93691727e26ff4104e0c16b9bb258     
v.使电气化( electrify的过去式和过去分词 );使兴奋
参考例句:
  • The railway line was electrified in the 1950s. 这条铁路线在20世纪50年代就实现了电气化。
  • The national railway system has nearly all been electrified. 全国的铁路系统几乎全部实现了电气化。 来自《简明英汉词典》
44 jubilee 9aLzJ     
n.周年纪念;欢乐
参考例句:
  • They had a big jubilee to celebrate the victory.他们举行盛大的周年纪念活动以祝贺胜利。
  • Every Jubilee,to take the opposite case,has served a function.反过来说,历次君主巡幸,都曾起到某种作用。
45 hearty Od1zn     
adj.热情友好的;衷心的;尽情的,纵情的
参考例句:
  • After work they made a hearty meal in the worker's canteen.工作完了,他们在工人食堂饱餐了一顿。
  • We accorded him a hearty welcome.我们给他热忱的欢迎。
46 promptly LRMxm     
adv.及时地,敏捷地
参考例句:
  • He paid the money back promptly.他立即还了钱。
  • She promptly seized the opportunity his absence gave her.她立即抓住了因他不在场给她创造的机会。
47 rosy kDAy9     
adj.美好的,乐观的,玫瑰色的
参考例句:
  • She got a new job and her life looks rosy.她找到一份新工作,生活看上去很美好。
  • She always takes a rosy view of life.她总是对生活持乐观态度。
48 bent QQ8yD     
n.爱好,癖好;adj.弯的;决心的,一心的
参考例句:
  • He was fully bent upon the project.他一心扑在这项计划上。
  • We bent over backward to help them.我们尽了最大努力帮助他们。
49 delightful 6xzxT     
adj.令人高兴的,使人快乐的
参考例句:
  • We had a delightful time by the seashore last Sunday.上星期天我们在海滨玩得真痛快。
  • Peter played a delightful melody on his flute.彼得用笛子吹奏了一支欢快的曲子。
50 phantom T36zQ     
n.幻影,虚位,幽灵;adj.错觉的,幻影的,幽灵的
参考例句:
  • I found myself staring at her as if she were a phantom.我发现自己瞪大眼睛看着她,好像她是一个幽灵。
  • He is only a phantom of a king.他只是有名无实的国王。
51 blessing UxDztJ     
n.祈神赐福;祷告;祝福,祝愿
参考例句:
  • The blessing was said in Hebrew.祷告用了希伯来语。
  • A double blessing has descended upon the house.双喜临门。
52 blessings 52a399b218b9208cade790a26255db6b     
n.(上帝的)祝福( blessing的名词复数 );好事;福分;因祸得福
参考例句:
  • Afflictions are sometimes blessings in disguise. 塞翁失马,焉知非福。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • We don't rely on blessings from Heaven. 我们不靠老天保佑。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
53 confidential MOKzA     
adj.秘(机)密的,表示信任的,担任机密工作的
参考例句:
  • He refused to allow his secretary to handle confidential letters.他不让秘书处理机密文件。
  • We have a confidential exchange of views.我们推心置腹地交换意见。
54 ripen ph3yq     
vt.使成熟;vi.成熟
参考例句:
  • I'm waiting for the apples to ripen.我正在等待苹果成熟。
  • You can ripen the tomatoes on a sunny windowsill.把西红柿放在有阳光的窗台上可以让它们成熟。
55 mellow F2iyP     
adj.柔和的;熟透的;v.变柔和;(使)成熟
参考例句:
  • These apples are mellow at this time of year.每年这时节,苹果就熟透了。
  • The colours become mellow as the sun went down.当太阳落山时,色彩变得柔和了。
56 impartial eykyR     
adj.(in,to)公正的,无偏见的
参考例句:
  • He gave an impartial view of the state of affairs in Ireland.他对爱尔兰的事态发表了公正的看法。
  • Careers officers offer impartial advice to all pupils.就业指导员向所有学生提供公正无私的建议。
57 muddle d6ezF     
n.困惑,混浊状态;vt.使混乱,使糊涂,使惊呆;vi.胡乱应付,混乱
参考例句:
  • Everything in the room was in a muddle.房间里每一件东西都是乱七八糟的。
  • Don't work in a rush and get into a muddle.克服忙乱现象。
58 remarkable 8Vbx6     
adj.显著的,异常的,非凡的,值得注意的
参考例句:
  • She has made remarkable headway in her writing skills.她在写作技巧方面有了长足进步。
  • These cars are remarkable for the quietness of their engines.这些汽车因发动机没有噪音而不同凡响。
59 philosophical rN5xh     
adj.哲学家的,哲学上的,达观的
参考例句:
  • The teacher couldn't answer the philosophical problem.老师不能解答这个哲学问题。
  • She is very philosophical about her bad luck.她对自己的不幸看得很开。
60 strictly GtNwe     
adv.严厉地,严格地;严密地
参考例句:
  • His doctor is dieting him strictly.他的医生严格规定他的饮食。
  • The guests were seated strictly in order of precedence.客人严格按照地位高低就座。
61 jumbled rpSzs2     
adj.混乱的;杂乱的
参考例句:
  • Books, shoes and clothes were jumbled together on the floor. 书、鞋子和衣服胡乱堆放在地板上。
  • The details of the accident were all jumbled together in his mind. 他把事故细节记得颠三倒四。
62 candor CN8zZ     
n.坦白,率真
参考例句:
  • He covered a wide range of topics with unusual candor.他极其坦率地谈了许多问题。
  • He and his wife had avoided candor,and they had drained their marriage.他们夫妻间不坦率,已使婚姻奄奄一息。
63 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  • This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  • There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
64 spartan 3hfzxL     
adj.简朴的,刻苦的;n.斯巴达;斯巴达式的人
参考例句:
  • Their spartan lifestyle prohibits a fridge or a phone.他们不使用冰箱和电话,过着简朴的生活。
  • The rooms were spartan and undecorated.房间没有装饰,极为简陋。
65 fable CzRyn     
n.寓言;童话;神话
参考例句:
  • The fable is given on the next page. 这篇寓言登在下一页上。
  • He had some motive in telling this fable. 他讲这寓言故事是有用意的。
66 streak UGgzL     
n.条理,斑纹,倾向,少许,痕迹;v.加条纹,变成条纹,奔驰,快速移动
参考例句:
  • The Indians used to streak their faces with paint.印第安人过去常用颜料在脸上涂条纹。
  • Why did you streak the tree?你为什么在树上刻条纹?
67 quenched dae604e1ea7cf81e688b2bffd9b9f2c4     
解(渴)( quench的过去式和过去分词 ); 终止(某事物); (用水)扑灭(火焰等); 将(热物体)放入水中急速冷却
参考例句:
  • He quenched his thirst with a long drink of cold water. 他喝了好多冷水解渴。
  • I quenched my thirst with a glass of cold beer. 我喝了一杯冰啤酒解渴。
68 complicate zX1yA     
vt.使复杂化,使混乱,使难懂
参考例句:
  • There is no need to complicate matters.没有必要使问题复杂化。
  • These events will greatly complicate the situation.这些事件将使局势变得极其复杂。
69 confidingly 5bd41445bb4f60819825713e4d46e324     
adv.信任地
参考例句:
  • She watched him confidingly and without any fear, faintly wagging her tail. 木木信任地望着自己最新近的主人,不但没有畏惧,还轻轻地摇着尾巴。 来自互联网
70 robin Oj7zme     
n.知更鸟,红襟鸟
参考例句:
  • The robin is the messenger of spring.知更鸟是报春的使者。
  • We knew spring was coming as we had seen a robin.我们看见了一只知更鸟,知道春天要到了。
71 contradictory VpazV     
adj.反驳的,反对的,抗辩的;n.正反对,矛盾对立
参考例句:
  • The argument is internally contradictory.论据本身自相矛盾。
  • What he said was self-contradictory.他讲话前后不符。
72 promising BkQzsk     
adj.有希望的,有前途的
参考例句:
  • The results of the experiments are very promising.实验的结果充满了希望。
  • We're trying to bring along one or two promising young swimmers.我们正设法培养出一两名有前途的年轻游泳选手。
73 perusal mM5xT     
n.细读,熟读;目测
参考例句:
  • Peter Cooke undertook to send each of us a sample contract for perusal.彼得·库克答应给我们每人寄送一份合同样本供阅读。
  • A perusal of the letters which we have published has satisfied him of the reality of our claim.读了我们的公开信后,他终于相信我们的要求的确是真的。
74 wrath nVNzv     
n.愤怒,愤慨,暴怒
参考例句:
  • His silence marked his wrath. 他的沉默表明了他的愤怒。
  • The wrath of the people is now aroused. 人们被激怒了。
75 exquisite zhez1     
adj.精美的;敏锐的;剧烈的,感觉强烈的
参考例句:
  • I was admiring the exquisite workmanship in the mosaic.我当时正在欣赏镶嵌画的精致做工。
  • I still remember the exquisite pleasure I experienced in Bali.我依然记得在巴厘岛所经历的那种剧烈的快感。
76 perplexed A3Rz0     
adj.不知所措的
参考例句:
  • The farmer felt the cow,went away,returned,sorely perplexed,always afraid of being cheated.那农民摸摸那头牛,走了又回来,犹豫不决,总怕上当受骗。
  • The child was perplexed by the intricate plot of the story.这孩子被那头绪纷繁的故事弄得迷惑不解。
77 morbid u6qz3     
adj.病的;致病的;病态的;可怕的
参考例句:
  • Some people have a morbid fascination with crime.一些人对犯罪有一种病态的痴迷。
  • It's morbid to dwell on cemeteries and such like.不厌其烦地谈论墓地以及诸如此类的事是一种病态。
78 expound hhOz7     
v.详述;解释;阐述
参考例句:
  • Why not get a diviner to expound my dream?为什么不去叫一个占卜者来解释我的梦呢?
  • The speaker has an hour to expound his views to the public.讲演者有1小时时间向公众阐明他的观点。
79 apparently tMmyQ     
adv.显然地;表面上,似乎
参考例句:
  • An apparently blind alley leads suddenly into an open space.山穷水尽,豁然开朗。
  • He was apparently much surprised at the news.他对那个消息显然感到十分惊异。
80 buffeting c681ae460087cfe7df93f4e3feaed986     
振动
参考例句:
  • The flowers took quite a buffeting in the storm. 花朵在暴风雨中备受摧残。
  • He's been buffeting with misfortunes for 15 years. 15年来,他与各种不幸相博斗。
81 stoutly Xhpz3l     
adv.牢固地,粗壮的
参考例句:
  • He stoutly denied his guilt.他断然否认自己有罪。
  • Burgess was taxed with this and stoutly denied it.伯杰斯为此受到了责难,但是他自己坚决否认有这回事。


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