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Chapter 21
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THE EXPEDITION

It was a cheerless morning when they got into the street; blowing and raining hard; and the clouds looking dull and stormy. The night had been very wet: large pools of water had collected in the road: and the kennels1 were overflowing2. There was a faint glimmering3 of the coming day in the sky; but it rather aggravated4 than relieved the gloom of the scene: the sombre light only serving to pale that which the street lamps afforded, without shedding any warmer or brighter tints5 upon the wet house-tops, and dreary6 streets. There appeared to be nobody stirring in that quarter of the town; the windows of the houses were all closely shut; and the streets through which they passed, were noiseless and empty.

By the time they had turned into the Bethnal Green Road, the day had fairly begun to break. Many of the lamps were already extinguished; a few country waggons7 were slowly toiling8 on, towards London; now and then, a stage-coach, covered with mud, rattled9 briskly by: the driver bestowing10, as he passed, and admonitory lash11 upon the heavy waggoner who, by keeping on the wrong side of the road, had endangered his arriving at the office, a quarter of a minute after his time. The public-houses, with gas-lights burning inside, were already open. By degrees, other shops began to be unclosed, and a few scattered12 people were met with. Then, came straggling groups of labourers going to their work; then, men and women with fish-baskets on their heads; donkey-carts laden13 with vegetables; chaise-carts filled with live-stock or whole carcasses of meat; milk-women with pails; an unbroken concourse of people, trudging14 out with various supplies to the eastern suburbs of the town. As they approached the City, the noise and traffic gradually increased; when they threaded the streets between Shoreditch and Smithfield, it had swelled15 into a roar of sound and bustle16. It was as light as it was likely to be, till night came on again, and the busy morning of half the London population had begun.

Turning down Sun Street and Crown Street, and crossing Finsbury square, Mr. Sikes struck, by way of Chiswell Street, into Barbican: thence into Long Lane, and so into Smithfield; from which latter place arose a tumult17 of discordant18 sounds that filled Oliver Twist with amazement19.

It was market-morning. The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth20 and mire21; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking22 bodies of the cattle, and mingling23 with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above. All the pens in the centre of the large area, and as many temporary pens as could be crowded into the vacant space, were filled with sheep; tied up to posts by the gutter24 side were long lines of beasts and oxen, three or four deep. Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers, and vagabonds of every low grade, were mingled25 together in a mass; the whistling of drovers, the barking dogs, the bellowing26 and plunging27 of the oxen, the bleating28 of sheep, the grunting29 and squeaking30 of pigs, the cries of hawkers, the shouts, oaths, and quarrelling on all sides; the ringing of bells and roar of voices, that issued from every public-house; the crowding, pushing, driving, beating, whooping31 and yelling; the hideous32 and discordant dim that resounded33 from every corner of the market; and the unwashed, unshaven, squalid, and dirty figures constantly running to and fro, and bursting in and out of the throng34; rendered it a stunning35 and bewildering scene, which quite confounded the senses.

Mr. Sikes, dragging Oliver after him, elbowed his way through the thickest of the crowd, and bestowed36 very little attention on the numerous sights and sounds, which so astonished the boy. He nodded, twice or thrice, to a passing friend; and, resisting as many invitations to take a morning dram, pressed steadily37 onward38, until they were clear of the turmoil39, and had made their way through Hosier Lane into Holborn.

'Now, young 'un!' said Sikes, looking up at the clock of St. Andrew's Church, 'hard upon seven! you must step out. Come, don't lag behind already, Lazy-legs!'

Mr. Sikes accompanied this speech with a jerk at his little companion's wrist; Oliver, quickening his pace into a kind of trot40 between a fast walk and a run, kept up with the rapid strides of the house-breaker as well as he could.

They held their course at this rate, until they had passed Hyde Park corner, and were on their way to Kensington: when Sikes relaxed his pace, until an empty cart which was at some little distance behind, came up. Seeing 'Hounslow' written on it, he asked the driver with as much civility as he could assume, if he would give them a lift as far as Isleworth.

'Jump up,' said the man. 'Is that your boy?'

'Yes; he's my boy,' replied Sikes, looking hard at Oliver, and putting his hand abstractedly into the pocket where the pistol was.

'Your father walks rather too quick for you, don't he, my man?' inquired the driver: seeing that Oliver was out of breath.

'Not a bit of it,' replied Sikes, interposing. 'He's used to it.

Here, take hold of my hand, Ned. In with you!'

Thus addressing Oliver, he helped him into the cart; and the driver, pointing to a heap of sacks, told him to lie down there, and rest himself.

As they passed the different mile-stones, Oliver wondered, more and more, where his companion meant to take him. Kensington, Hammersmith, Chiswick, Kew Bridge, Brentford, were all passed; and yet they went on as steadily as if they had only just begun their journey. At length, they came to a public-house called the Coach and Horses; a little way beyond which, another road appeared to run off. And here, the cart stopped.

Sikes dismounted with great precipitation, holding Oliver by the hand all the while; and lifting him down directly, bestowed a furious look upon him, and rapped the side-pocket with his fist, in a significant manner.

'Good-bye, boy,' said the man.

'He's sulky,' replied Sikes, giving him a shake; 'he's sulky. A young dog! Don't mind him.'

'Not I!' rejoined the other, getting into his cart. 'It's a fine day, after all.' And he drove away.

Sikes waited until he had fairly gone; and then, telling Oliver he might look about him if he wanted, once again led him onward on his journey.

They turned round to the left, a short way past the public-house; and then, taking a right-hand road, walked on for a long time: passing many large gardens and gentlemen's houses on both sides of the way, and stopping for nothing but a little beer, until they reached a town. Here against the wall of a house, Oliver saw written up in pretty large letters, 'Hampton.' They lingered about, in the fields, for some hours. At length they came back into the town; and, turning into an old public-house with a defaced sign-board, ordered some dinner by the kitchen fire.

The kitchen was an old, low-roofed room; with a great beam across the middle of the ceiling, and benches, with high backs to them, by the fire; on which were seated several rough men in smock-frocks, drinking and smoking. They took no notice of Oliver; and very little of Sikes; and, as Sikes took very little notice of them, he and his young comrade sat in a corner by themselves, without being much troubled by their company.

They had some cold meat for dinner, and sat so long after it, while Mr. Sikes indulged himself with three or four pipes, that Oliver began to feel quite certain they were not going any further. Being much tired with the walk, and getting up so early, he dozed41 a little at first; then, quite overpowered by fatigue42 and the fumes43 of the tobacco, fell asleep.

It was quite dark when he was awakened44 by a push from Sikes. Rousing himself sufficiently45 to sit up and look about him, he found that worthy46 in close fellowship and communication with a labouring man, over a pint47 of ale.

'So, you're going on to Lower Halliford, are you?' inquired Sikes.

'Yes, I am,' replied the man, who seemed a little the worse--or better, as the case might be--for drinking; 'and not slow about it neither. My horse hasn't got a load behind him going back, as he had coming up in the mornin'; and he won't be long a-doing of it. Here's luck to him. Ecod! he's a good 'un!'

'Could you give my boy and me a lift as far as there?' demanded Sikes, pushing the ale towards his new friend.

'If you're going directly, I can,' replied the man, looking out of the pot. 'Are you going to Halliford?'

'Going on to Shepperton,' replied Sikes.

'I'm your man, as far as I go,' replied the other. 'Is all paid, Becky?'

'Yes, the other gentleman's paid,' replied the girl.

'I say!' said the man, with tipsy gravity; 'that won't do, you know.'

'Why not?' rejoined Sikes. 'You're a-going to accommodate us, and wot's to prevent my standing48 treat for a pint or so, in return?'

The stranger reflected upon this argument, with a very profound face; having done so, he seized Sikes by the hand: and declared he was a real good fellow. To which Mr. Sikes replied, he was joking; as, if he had been sober, there would have been strong reason to suppose he was.

After the exchange of a few more compliments, they bade the company good-night, and went out; the girl gathering49 up the pots and glasses as they did so, and lounging out to the door, with her hands full, to see the party start.

The horse, whose health had been drunk in his absence, was standing outside: ready harnessed to the cart. Oliver and Sikes got in without any further ceremony; and the man to whom he belonged, having lingered for a minute or two 'to bear him up,' and to defy the hostler and the world to produce his equal, mounted also. Then, the hostler was told to give the horse his head; and, his head being given him, he made a very unpleasant use of it: tossing it into the air with great disdain50, and running into the parlour windows over the way; after performing those feats51, and supporting himself for a short time on his hind-legs, he started off at great speed, and rattled out of the town right gallantly52.

The night was very dark. A damp mist rose from the river, and the marshy53 ground about; and spread itself over the dreary fields. It was piercing cold, too; all was gloomy and black. Not a word was spoken; for the driver had grown sleepy; and Sikes was in no mood to lead him into conversation. Oliver sat huddled54 together, in a corner of the cart; bewildered with alarm and apprehension55; and figuring strange objects in the gaunt trees, whose branches waved grimly to and fro, as if in some fantastic joy at the desolation of the scene.

As they passed Sunbury Church, the clock struck seven. There was a light in the ferry-house window opposite: which streamed across the road, and threw into more sombre shadow a dark yew-tree with graves beneath it. There was a dull sound of falling water not far off; and the leaves of the old tree stirred gently in the night wind. It seemed like quiet music for the repose56 of the dead.

Sunbury was passed through, and they came again into the lonely road. Two or three miles more, and the cart stopped. Sikes alighted, took Oliver by the hand, and they once again walked on.

They turned into no house at Shepperton, as the weary boy had expected; but still kept walking on, in mud and darkness, through gloomy lanes and over cold open wastes, until they came within sight of the lights of a town at no great distance. On looking intently forward, Oliver saw that the water was just below them, and that they were coming to the foot of a bridge.

Sikes kept straight on, until they were close upon the bridge; then turned suddenly down a bank upon the left.

'The water!' thought Oliver, turning sick with fear. 'He has brought me to this lonely place to murder me!'

He was about to throw himself on the ground, and make one struggle for his young life, when he saw that they stood before a solitary57 house: all ruinous and decayed. There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above; but no light was visible. The house was dark, dismantled58: and the all appearance, uninhabited.

Sikes, with Oliver's hand still in his, softly approached the low porch, and raised the latch59. The door yielded to the pressure, and they passed in together.


    他们来到街上。这是一个令人扫兴的早晨,风疾雨猛,漫天阴云,像是要来一场暴风雨。夜里雨下得很猛,路上积起了无数的大水洼,水沟也都满了。天空透出一道隐隐可见的微光,预示着新的一天即将来临,而这一道亮光非但没有减轻反倒加重了景物的幽暗,使街灯射出的光芒变得一片苍白,没有在湿漉漉的屋顶和凄凉的街道上洒下一丝温暖、明亮的色彩。这一带街区似乎还没有人起床,房屋的窗户全都关得紧紧的,他们经过的街道也是一片沉寂,空无一人。

    直到他们拐进贝丝勒尔草地大道,天色才总算亮起来了。灯光大多已经熄灭,几辆乡间的大车朝伦敦缓缓驶去,时而有一辆糊满泥污的公共马车咔哒咔哒地飞驰而过,车把式在赶到前边去的时候,总要惩戒性地照着呆头呆脑的大车老板来一鞭子,他们占错了车道,很可能会害得他比规定时间迟十几秒钟到站。点着煤气灯的酒馆已经开堂,别的商号也一家接一家开始营业,路上有了零零星星的行人。接着,络绎不绝地涌来了一群群上班的工人,头上顶着鱼筐的男男女女,装有各种蔬菜的驴车,满载活畜或是宰好的全猪全羊的双轮马车,手提牛奶桶的妇人――一股源源不断的人流携带着各种食品,艰难地向东郊移动着。到了商业中心区附近,喧闹声与车辆行人的往来更是有增无已。当赛克斯拉着奥立弗挤过肖狄奇区和伦敦肉市场之间的街道时,这种车水马龙的景象终于汇成一片喧嚣与奔忙。天已经完全亮了,同往日没什么两样,大概一直要持续到黑夜重新来临。伦敦城一半的市民迎来了他们繁忙的早晨。

    赛克斯先生带着奥立弗拐进太阳街,克朗街,穿过芬斯伯雷广场,沿着契士韦尔路急步闪人望楼街,又溜进长巷否证科学理论系统的任何一个部分,主张用“有用”,“有,来到伦敦肉市场,这个地方传出一片纷乱的喧闹,使奥立弗退斯特大为惊讶。

    这天早晨正逢赶集。地面覆盖着几乎漫过脚踝的污泥浊水,浓浊的水气不断地从刚刚宰杀的牲畜身上腾起,与仿佛是驻留在烟囱顶上的雾混合起来,沉甸甸地垂挂在市场上空。在这一大片平地的中心,所有的畜栏,连同许许多多还可以往这片空地里挤一挤的临时棚圈,都关满了羊,水沟边的木桩上拴着三四排菜牛和枯牛。乡下人、屠户、家畜经纪人、沿街叫买的小贩、顽童小偷、看热闹的,以及各个社会底层中的流氓无赖,密密麻麻挤成一团。家畜经纪人打着日哨,狗狂吠乱叫,公牛边蹬蹄子边吼,羊咩咩地叫,猪嗯叽嗯叽地哼哼;小贩的叫卖声、四面八方的呼喊、咒骂、争吵;一家家酒馆里钟鸣铃响,人声喧哗;拥挤推拉,追的追,打的打,叫好的,吆喝的;市场的每一个角落都响荡着这种震耳欲聋的噪音。一些蓬头垢面、衣衫褴楼的角色,在人群中不断跑进跑出,时隐时现,这一切构成了一副令人头晕目眩,手足无措的纷扰场面。

    赛克斯先生拖着奥立弗往前走,他用胳膊肘从密集的人群中拨开一条路,对那些弄得奥立弗大为惊异的场面和声音毫不在意。他有两三次跟偶然相遇的朋友点点头,对于来一番清晨小饮的多次邀请通通予以拒绝,管自头也不回地向前走着,直到他们摆脱这个旋涡,两人穿过袜子巷,朝霍尔本山走去。

    “喂,小家伙,”赛克斯抬眼看了看圣安德鲁教堂的大钟,说道,“快七点了。你得走快点。走啊体”乃是与上帝相联系的个人时,才能摆脱空虚孤独之感,消,别再落在后头啦,懒虫。”

    说着,赛克斯先生在小伙伴的手腕上狠命扭了一把,奥立弗加快步伐,变成一种介乎于快走与飞奔之间的小跑,尽力跟上这个大步流星的强盗。

    他们一路上保持着这种速度,转过海德公园拐角,向肯辛顿走去,这时赛克斯放慢了脚步,等着后边不远处一辆没拉货的马车赶上来。赛克斯见车上写着“杭斯洛”字样,便尽量装出客客气气的样子,问车把式可不可以帮忙捎个脚,带他们到艾尔沃斯。

    “上来吧,”车把式说道,“这是你儿子?”

    “是啊,是我儿子。”赛克斯说话时眼睛盯着奥立弗,一只手下意识地插进放有手枪的衣袋里。

    “你爸爸走得太快了一点,是不是啊,小伙子?”车把式见奥立弗累得上气不接下气,开口问道。

    “没有的事,”赛克斯插话说,“他习惯了。来,勒德,抓住我的手,上去吧_”

    赛克斯嘴里这样说,扶着奥立弗上了马车,车把式指了指一堆麻袋,要他在那儿躺下来,歇一会儿。

    马车驶过一块又一块路牌,奥立弗越来越感到纳闷,不知道同伴到底要把自己带到什么地方去。肯辛顿、海姆士密斯、契息克、植物园桥、布伦福德都丢到后边去了,马车依然载着他们不紧不慢地往前开,就好像刚刚开始这趟旅行一样。最后,他们到了一家叫做“车马”的小酒馆前边,再走一程就要拐上另一条大路了。马车停了下来。

    赛克斯莽里莽撞地跳下马车,依旧抓住奥立弗的手不放,随即又将他抱起来放到地上,同时投过去一道狠巴巴的眼色,意味深长地用拳头在侧边衣袋上嘭嘭地拍了两下。

    “再会,孩子。”车把式说。

    “他在闹别扭,”赛克斯摇了摇奥立弗,答道,“闹别扭了。这狗崽子。你别见怪。”

    “我才不哩。”那人一边说,一边爬上马车。“一句话,天气可真不赖。”他赶着车走了。

    赛克斯眼看着马车走远了,这才告诉奥立弗,他可以前后左右看看,如果他有这份兴致的话,说罢又领着他上路了。

    过酒店不远,他们向左拐了个弯,又折上右边一条路,他们走了很长时间,把道路两侧的许多大花园和豪华住宅甩到身后,只间或停下来喝一点啤酒,一径来到一座小镇。奥立弗看见,有一所房子的墙上写着“汉普敦”几个相当醒目的大字。他们到野外游荡了几个小时,末了又回到镇子里,进了一家客栈兼营餐饮的老店,店门口挂着的招牌已无法辨认,叫厨房炒了几样菜,就在炉灶旁边吃。

    厨房是一间顶棚低矮的旧屋子,一根巨大的房梁从天花板正中横穿而过,炉子旁边放着几张高青长凳,几个身穿长罩衫的鲁莽汉子正坐在那里喝酒抽烟。他们略略打量了一下赛克斯,简直就没把奥立弗看在眼见赛克斯没大理会他们,他和小伙伴在一个角落里坐下来,并没有因有人在场而感到不便。

    他们吃了些冷向当晚饭,饭后又坐了很久,赛克斯先生自得其乐,吸了四管烟斗,奥立弗认定他们再也不会赶路了。起了一个大早,又走了那么远路,他真累坏了,开始他只是在打盹,随后就被疲劳和烟草的香味所制服,不知不觉睡着了。

    当赛克斯一把将他推醒的时候,天已经黑尽了。他赶走睡意,坐起来,看了看四周,发现这位知名人士和一个庄稼汉模样的人正在喝一品脱啤酒,谈得正投机。

    “那么说,你这就要去下哈利佛德,是不是?”赛克斯问。

    “是啊,这就去,”那人好像已经带上了一点醉意,但也可能因此更来劲了。“再说也慢不到哪儿去。我的马回去是拉空车,不像早晨出来拉得那样重,老这么着可不行啊。祝它走运。哦喀。真是头好牲口。”

    “你能不能把我和这孩子顺路捎到那儿去?”赛克斯一边问,一边把啤酒推到新朋友面前。

    “你要是马上就走,我包了,”那人从啤酒缸后面望着他,答道。“你是要去哈利佛德?”

    “去西普顿。”赛克斯回答。

    “你尽管吩咐,我也走这一路,”另一位答道,“蓓姬,算账?”

    “账都算过了,是那位先生会的钞。”女仆应声说道。

    “我说,”那汉子带着酒后的庄重说,“这可不行。”

    “干吗不行?”赛克斯答道,“你帮了我们的忙,就不兴我请你喝一品脱啤酒什么的,表示个心意?”

    陌生人摆出一副老成持重的神色,将这句话推敲了一下,然后,他一把抓住赛克斯的手,说他真够朋友。赛克斯先生回答说对方是在开玩笑,因为,除非是他喝醉了,他有的是理由去证明自己是在说笑话。

    两人又客套了几句,跟别的客人道过晚安,便走了出去。女仆借这功夫把杯盘碗盏收拢来,双手捧得满满的,走到门日,目送他们离去。

    主人背地里已经为它的健康祝过酒的那匹马就在门外,马具也都套好了。奥立弗和赛克斯不再客气,管自上了马车。马的主人溜达了一两分钟,说是“替它打打气”,同时也向旅店的那个骡马夫和全世界示威,量他们也找不出同样的马,这才上了车。接着,骡马夫奉命放松马疆。僵绳松开了,那匹马却把缰绳派上了一种非常令人讨厌的用场:大大咧咧地把缰绳甩到空中,直飞进马路对过的会客室窗户。等这一揽子绝技表演完毕,马又前蹄腾空,来了个瞬间直立,然后飞一般地跑起来,马车咔哒咔哒地响着,神气活现地出了城。

    这一夜黑得出奇,湿漉漉的雾气从河上、从周围的沼泽地里升起来,在沉寂的原野上铺展开去。寒意料峭,一切都显得阴森而幽暗。路途中谁也不说一句话,车把式不停地打瞌睡,赛克斯也没有心思引他搭话。奥立弗在大车角落里缩成一团,心中充满恐惧和疑虑,揣摸着枯树丛中一定有好些怪物,那些树枝恶狠狠地摇来摇去,像是面对这副凄凉的场面有着说不出的高兴似的。

    当他们走过桑伯雷教堂时,钟正好敲七点。对面渡口窗户里亮着一盏灯,灯光越过大路,将一棵黑黝黝的杉树连同树下的一座座坟墓投入更昏暗的阴影之中。不远的地方传来刻板的流水声,老树的叶片在晚风中微微颤动,这幅景色真像是了却尘缘时那种无声的乐章。

    桑伯雷过去了,他们重新驶上荒凉的大路。又走了两三英里,马车停住了。两个人跳下车来。赛克斯抓住奥立弗的手,又一次徒步朝前走去。

    他们在西普顿没有逗留,这有点出乎疲惫不堪的奥立弗的猜测,而是趁着夜色,趟过泥浆,继续往前走,插进黑沉沉的小路,越过寒冷广袤的荒野,一直走到能够看见前边不远处一座市镇的点点灯火。奥立弗探头仔细看了看,发现下边就是河,他们正朝桥墩走过去。

    赛克斯头也不回地走着,眼看就要到桥边了,突然又转向左边,朝河岸走下去。

    “那边是河。”一个念头从奥立弗脑子里闪过,吓得他头都大了。“他带我到这个没有人的地方,是想杀死我。”

    他正准备躺倒在地,为保住自己的生命作一番挣扎,却发现他俩的面前是一所孤零零的房子。这房子东倒西歪,一片破败。大门摇摇欲坠,两边各有一扇窗户,上面还有一层楼,可是一点亮光也看不见。房于里边一片漆黑,空空如也,怎么看也找不出有人居住的痕迹。

    赛克斯依然紧抓着奥立弗的手,轻轻走近低矮的门廊,把插销提起来。门推开了,他们一起走了进去。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 kennels 1c735b47bdfbcac5c1ca239c583bbe85     
n.主人外出时的小动物寄养处,养狗场;狗窝( kennel的名词复数 );养狗场
参考例句:
  • We put the dog in kennels when we go away. 我们外出时把狗寄养在养狗场。
  • He left his dog in a kennels when he went on holiday. 他外出度假时把狗交给养狗场照管。 来自《简明英汉词典》
2 overflowing df84dc195bce4a8f55eb873daf61b924     
n. 溢出物,溢流 adj. 充沛的,充满的 动词overflow的现在分词形式
参考例句:
  • The stands were overflowing with farm and sideline products. 集市上农副产品非常丰富。
  • The milk is overflowing. 牛奶溢出来了。
3 glimmering 7f887db7600ddd9ce546ca918a89536a     
n.微光,隐约的一瞥adj.薄弱地发光的v.发闪光,发微光( glimmer的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • I got some glimmering of what he was driving at. 他这么说是什么意思,我有点明白了。 来自辞典例句
  • Now that darkness was falling, only their silhouettes were outlined against the faintly glimmering sky. 这时节两山只剩余一抹深黑,赖天空微明为画出一个轮廓。 来自汉英文学 - 散文英译
4 aggravated d0aec1b8bb810b0e260cb2aa0ff9c2ed     
使恶化( aggravate的过去式和过去分词 ); 使更严重; 激怒; 使恼火
参考例句:
  • If he aggravated me any more I shall hit him. 假如他再激怒我,我就要揍他。
  • Far from relieving my cough, the medicine aggravated it. 这药非但不镇咳,反而使我咳嗽得更厉害。
5 tints 41fd51b51cf127789864a36f50ef24bf     
色彩( tint的名词复数 ); 带白的颜色; (淡色)染发剂; 痕迹
参考例句:
  • leaves with red and gold autumn tints 金秋时节略呈红黄色的树叶
  • The whole countryside glowed with autumn tints. 乡间处处呈现出灿烂的秋色。
6 dreary sk1z6     
adj.令人沮丧的,沉闷的,单调乏味的
参考例句:
  • They live such dreary lives.他们的生活如此乏味。
  • She was tired of hearing the same dreary tale of drunkenness and violence.她听够了那些关于酗酒和暴力的乏味故事。
7 waggons 7f311524bb40ea4850e619136422fbc0     
四轮的运货马车( waggon的名词复数 ); 铁路货车; 小手推车
参考例句:
  • Most transport is done by electrified waggons. 大部分货物都用电瓶车运送。
8 toiling 9e6f5a89c05478ce0b1205d063d361e5     
长时间或辛苦地工作( toil的现在分词 ); 艰难缓慢地移动,跋涉
参考例句:
  • The fiery orator contrasted the idle rich with the toiling working classes. 这位激昂的演说家把无所事事的富人同终日辛劳的工人阶级进行了对比。
  • She felt like a beetle toiling in the dust. She was filled with repulsion. 她觉得自己像只甲虫在地里挣扎,心中涌满愤恨。
9 rattled b4606e4247aadf3467575ffedf66305b     
慌乱的,恼火的
参考例句:
  • The truck jolted and rattled over the rough ground. 卡车嘎吱嘎吱地在凹凸不平的地面上颠簸而行。
  • Every time a bus went past, the windows rattled. 每逢公共汽车经过这里,窗户都格格作响。
10 bestowing ec153f37767cf4f7ef2c4afd6905b0fb     
砖窑中砖堆上层已烧透的砖
参考例句:
  • Apollo, you see, is bestowing the razor on the Triptolemus of our craft. 你瞧,阿波罗正在把剃刀赠给我们这项手艺的特里泼托勒默斯。
  • What thanks do we not owe to Heaven for thus bestowing tranquillity, health and competence! 我们要谢谢上苍,赐我们的安乐、健康和饱暖。
11 lash a2oxR     
v.系牢;鞭打;猛烈抨击;n.鞭打;眼睫毛
参考例句:
  • He received a lash of her hand on his cheek.他突然被她打了一记耳光。
  • With a lash of its tail the tiger leaped at her.老虎把尾巴一甩朝她扑过来。
12 scattered 7jgzKF     
adj.分散的,稀疏的;散步的;疏疏落落的
参考例句:
  • Gathering up his scattered papers,he pushed them into his case.他把散乱的文件收拾起来,塞进文件夹里。
13 laden P2gx5     
adj.装满了的;充满了的;负了重担的;苦恼的
参考例句:
  • He is laden with heavy responsibility.他肩负重任。
  • Dragging the fully laden boat across the sand dunes was no mean feat.将满载货物的船拖过沙丘是一件了不起的事。
14 trudging f66543befe0044651f745d00cf696010     
vt.& vi.跋涉,吃力地走(trudge的现在分词形式)
参考例句:
  • There was a stream of refugees trudging up the valley towards the border. 一队难民步履艰难地爬上山谷向着边境走去。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Two mules well laden with packs were trudging along. 两头骡子驮着沉重的背包,吃力地往前走。 来自辞典例句
15 swelled bd4016b2ddc016008c1fc5827f252c73     
增强( swell的过去式和过去分词 ); 肿胀; (使)凸出; 充满(激情)
参考例句:
  • The infection swelled his hand. 由于感染,他的手肿了起来。
  • After the heavy rain the river swelled. 大雨过后,河水猛涨。
16 bustle esazC     
v.喧扰地忙乱,匆忙,奔忙;n.忙碌;喧闹
参考例句:
  • The bustle and din gradually faded to silence as night advanced.随着夜越来越深,喧闹声逐渐沉寂。
  • There is a lot of hustle and bustle in the railway station.火车站里非常拥挤。
17 tumult LKrzm     
n.喧哗;激动,混乱;吵闹
参考例句:
  • The tumult in the streets awakened everyone in the house.街上的喧哗吵醒了屋子里的每一个人。
  • His voice disappeared under growing tumult.他的声音消失在越来越响的喧哗声中。
18 discordant VlRz2     
adj.不调和的
参考例句:
  • Leonato thought they would make a discordant pair.里奥那托认为他们不适宜作夫妻。
  • For when we are deeply mournful discordant above all others is the voice of mirth.因为当我们极度悲伤的时候,欢乐的声音会比其他一切声音都更显得不谐调。
19 amazement 7zlzBK     
n.惊奇,惊讶
参考例句:
  • All those around him looked at him with amazement.周围的人都对他投射出惊异的眼光。
  • He looked at me in blank amazement.他带着迷茫惊诧的神情望着我。
20 filth Cguzj     
n.肮脏,污物,污秽;淫猥
参考例句:
  • I don't know how you can read such filth.我不明白你怎么会去读这种淫秽下流的东西。
  • The dialogue was all filth and innuendo.这段对话全是下流的言辞和影射。
21 mire 57ZzT     
n.泥沼,泥泞;v.使...陷于泥泞,使...陷入困境
参考例句:
  • I don't want my son's good name dragged through the mire.我不想使我儿子的名誉扫地。
  • He has rescued me from the mire of misery.他把我从苦海里救了出来。
22 reeking 31102d5a8b9377cf0b0942c887792736     
v.发出浓烈的臭气( reek的现在分词 );散发臭气;发出难闻的气味 (of sth);明显带有(令人不快或生疑的跡象)
参考例句:
  • I won't have you reeking with sweat in my bed! 我就不许你混身臭汗,臭烘烘的上我的炕! 来自汉英文学 - 骆驼祥子
  • This is a novel reeking with sentimentalism. 这是一本充满着感伤主义的小说。 来自辞典例句
23 mingling b387131b4ffa62204a89fca1610062f3     
adj.混合的
参考例句:
  • There was a spring of bitterness mingling with that fountain of sweets. 在这个甜蜜的源泉中间,已经掺和进苦涩的山水了。
  • The mingling of inconsequence belongs to us all. 这场矛盾混和物是我们大家所共有的。
24 gutter lexxk     
n.沟,街沟,水槽,檐槽,贫民窟
参考例句:
  • There's a cigarette packet thrown into the gutter.阴沟里有个香烟盒。
  • He picked her out of the gutter and made her a great lady.他使她脱离贫苦生活,并成为贵妇。
25 mingled fdf34efd22095ed7e00f43ccc823abdf     
混合,混入( mingle的过去式和过去分词 ); 混进,与…交往[联系]
参考例句:
  • The sounds of laughter and singing mingled in the evening air. 笑声和歌声交织在夜空中。
  • The man and the woman mingled as everyone started to relax. 当大家开始放松的时候,这一男一女就开始交往了。
26 bellowing daf35d531c41de75017204c30dff5cac     
v.发出吼叫声,咆哮(尤指因痛苦)( bellow的现在分词 );(愤怒地)说出(某事),大叫
参考例句:
  • We could hear he was bellowing commands to his troops. 我们听见他正向他的兵士大声发布命令。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • He disguised these feelings under an enormous bellowing and hurraying. 他用大声吼叫和喝采掩饰着这些感情。 来自辞典例句
27 plunging 5fe12477bea00d74cd494313d62da074     
adj.跳进的,突进的v.颠簸( plunge的现在分词 );暴跌;骤降;突降
参考例句:
  • War broke out again, plunging the people into misery and suffering. 战祸复发,生灵涂炭。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  • He is plunging into an abyss of despair. 他陷入了绝望的深渊。 来自《简明英汉词典》
28 bleating ba46da1dd0448d69e0fab1a7ebe21b34     
v.(羊,小牛)叫( bleat的现在分词 );哭诉;发出羊叫似的声音;轻声诉说
参考例句:
  • I don't like people who go around bleating out things like that. 我不喜欢跑来跑去讲那种蠢话的人。 来自辞典例句
  • He heard the tinny phonograph bleating as he walked in. 他步入室内时听到那架蹩脚的留声机在呜咽。 来自辞典例句
29 grunting ae2709ef2cd9ee22f906b0a6a6886465     
咕哝的,呼噜的
参考例句:
  • He pulled harder on the rope, grunting with the effort. 他边用力边哼声,使出更大的力气拉绳子。
  • Pigs were grunting and squealing in the yard. 猪在院子里哼哼地叫个不停。
30 squeaking 467e7b45c42df668cdd7afec9e998feb     
v.短促地尖叫( squeak的现在分词 );吱吱叫;告密;充当告密者
参考例句:
  • Squeaking floorboards should be screwed down. 踏上去咯咯作响的地板应用螺钉钉住。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Can you hear the mice squeaking? 你听到老鼠吱吱叫吗? 来自《简明英汉词典》
31 whooping 3b8fa61ef7ccd46b156de6bf873a9395     
发嗬嗬声的,发咳声的
参考例句:
  • Whooping cough is very prevalent just now. 百日咳正在广泛流行。
  • Have you had your child vaccinated against whooping cough? 你给你的孩子打过百日咳疫苗了吗?
32 hideous 65KyC     
adj.丑陋的,可憎的,可怕的,恐怖的
参考例句:
  • The whole experience had been like some hideous nightmare.整个经历就像一场可怕的噩梦。
  • They're not like dogs,they're hideous brutes.它们不像狗,是丑陋的畜牲。
33 resounded 063087faa0e6dc89fa87a51a1aafc1f9     
v.(指声音等)回荡于某处( resound的过去式和过去分词 );产生回响;(指某处)回荡着声音
参考例句:
  • Laughter resounded through the house. 笑声在屋里回荡。
  • The echo resounded back to us. 回声传回到我们的耳中。 来自《简明英汉词典》
34 throng sGTy4     
n.人群,群众;v.拥挤,群集
参考例句:
  • A patient throng was waiting in silence.一大群耐心的人在静静地等着。
  • The crowds thronged into the mall.人群涌进大厅。
35 stunning NhGzDh     
adj.极好的;使人晕倒的
参考例句:
  • His plays are distinguished only by their stunning mediocrity.他的戏剧与众不同之处就是平凡得出奇。
  • The finished effect was absolutely stunning.完工后的效果非常美。
36 bestowed 12e1d67c73811aa19bdfe3ae4a8c2c28     
赠给,授予( bestow的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • It was a title bestowed upon him by the king. 那是国王赐给他的头衔。
  • He considered himself unworthy of the honour they had bestowed on him. 他认为自己不配得到大家赋予他的荣誉。
37 steadily Qukw6     
adv.稳定地;不变地;持续地
参考例句:
  • The scope of man's use of natural resources will steadily grow.人类利用自然资源的广度将日益扩大。
  • Our educational reform was steadily led onto the correct path.我们的教学改革慢慢上轨道了。
38 onward 2ImxI     
adj.向前的,前进的;adv.向前,前进,在先
参考例句:
  • The Yellow River surges onward like ten thousand horses galloping.黄河以万马奔腾之势滚滚向前。
  • He followed in the steps of forerunners and marched onward.他跟随着先辈的足迹前进。
39 turmoil CKJzj     
n.骚乱,混乱,动乱
参考例句:
  • His mind was in such a turmoil that he couldn't get to sleep.内心的纷扰使他无法入睡。
  • The robbery put the village in a turmoil.抢劫使全村陷入混乱。
40 trot aKBzt     
n.疾走,慢跑;n.老太婆;现成译本;(复数)trots:腹泻(与the 连用);v.小跑,快步走,赶紧
参考例句:
  • They passed me at a trot.他们从我身边快步走过。
  • The horse broke into a brisk trot.马突然快步小跑起来。
41 dozed 30eca1f1e3c038208b79924c30b35bfc     
v.打盹儿,打瞌睡( doze的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • He boozed till daylight and dozed into the afternoon. 他喝了个通霄,昏沉沉地一直睡到下午。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
  • I dozed off during the soporific music. 我听到这催人入睡的音乐,便不知不觉打起盹儿来了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
42 fatigue PhVzV     
n.疲劳,劳累
参考例句:
  • The old lady can't bear the fatigue of a long journey.这位老妇人不能忍受长途旅行的疲劳。
  • I have got over my weakness and fatigue.我已从虚弱和疲劳中恢复过来了。
43 fumes lsYz3Q     
n.(强烈而刺激的)气味,气体
参考例句:
  • The health of our children is being endangered by exhaust fumes. 我们孩子们的健康正受到排放出的废气的损害。
  • Exhaust fumes are bad for your health. 废气对健康有害。
44 awakened de71059d0b3cd8a1de21151c9166f9f0     
v.(使)醒( awaken的过去式和过去分词 );(使)觉醒;弄醒;(使)意识到
参考例句:
  • She awakened to the sound of birds singing. 她醒来听到鸟的叫声。
  • The public has been awakened to the full horror of the situation. 公众完全意识到了这一状况的可怕程度。 来自《简明英汉词典》
45 sufficiently 0htzMB     
adv.足够地,充分地
参考例句:
  • It turned out he had not insured the house sufficiently.原来他没有给房屋投足保险。
  • The new policy was sufficiently elastic to accommodate both views.新政策充分灵活地适用两种观点。
46 worthy vftwB     
adj.(of)值得的,配得上的;有价值的
参考例句:
  • I did not esteem him to be worthy of trust.我认为他不值得信赖。
  • There occurred nothing that was worthy to be mentioned.没有值得一提的事发生。
47 pint 1NNxL     
n.品脱
参考例句:
  • I'll have a pint of beer and a packet of crisps, please.我要一品脱啤酒和一袋炸马铃薯片。
  • In the old days you could get a pint of beer for a shilling.从前,花一先令就可以买到一品脱啤酒。
48 standing 2hCzgo     
n.持续,地位;adj.永久的,不动的,直立的,不流动的
参考例句:
  • After the earthquake only a few houses were left standing.地震过后只有几幢房屋还立着。
  • They're standing out against any change in the law.他们坚决反对对法律做任何修改。
49 gathering ChmxZ     
n.集会,聚会,聚集
参考例句:
  • He called on Mr. White to speak at the gathering.他请怀特先生在集会上讲话。
  • He is on the wing gathering material for his novels.他正忙于为他的小说收集资料。
50 disdain KltzA     
n.鄙视,轻视;v.轻视,鄙视,不屑
参考例句:
  • Some people disdain labour.有些人轻视劳动。
  • A great man should disdain flatterers.伟大的人物应鄙视献媚者。
51 feats 8b538e09d25672d5e6ed5058f2318d51     
功绩,伟业,技艺( feat的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He used to astound his friends with feats of physical endurance. 过去,他表现出来的惊人耐力常让朋友们大吃一惊。
  • His heroic feats made him a legend in his own time. 他的英雄业绩使他成了他那个时代的传奇人物。
52 gallantly gallantly     
adv. 漂亮地,勇敢地,献殷勤地
参考例句:
  • He gallantly offered to carry her cases to the car. 他殷勤地要帮她把箱子拎到车子里去。
  • The new fighters behave gallantly under fire. 新战士在炮火下表现得很勇敢。
53 marshy YBZx8     
adj.沼泽的
参考例句:
  • In August 1935,we began our march across the marshy grassland. 1935年8月,我们开始过草地。
  • The surrounding land is low and marshy. 周围的地低洼而多沼泽。
54 huddled 39b87f9ca342d61fe478b5034beb4139     
挤在一起(huddle的过去式与过去分词形式)
参考例句:
  • We huddled together for warmth. 我们挤在一块取暖。
  • We huddled together to keep warm. 我们挤在一起来保暖。
55 apprehension bNayw     
n.理解,领悟;逮捕,拘捕;忧虑
参考例句:
  • There were still areas of doubt and her apprehension grew.有些地方仍然存疑,于是她越来越担心。
  • She is a girl of weak apprehension.她是一个理解力很差的女孩。
56 repose KVGxQ     
v.(使)休息;n.安息
参考例句:
  • Don't disturb her repose.不要打扰她休息。
  • Her mouth seemed always to be smiling,even in repose.她的嘴角似乎总是挂着微笑,即使在睡眠时也是这样。
57 solitary 7FUyx     
adj.孤独的,独立的,荒凉的;n.隐士
参考例句:
  • I am rather fond of a solitary stroll in the country.我颇喜欢在乡间独自徜徉。
  • The castle rises in solitary splendour on the fringe of the desert.这座城堡巍然耸立在沙漠的边际,显得十分壮美。
58 dismantled 73a4c4fbed1e8a5ab30949425a267145     
拆开( dismantle的过去式和过去分词 ); 拆卸; 废除; 取消
参考例句:
  • The plant was dismantled of all its equipment and furniture. 这家工厂的设备和家具全被拆除了。
  • The Japanese empire was quickly dismantled. 日本帝国很快被打垮了。
59 latch g2wxS     
n.门闩,窗闩;弹簧锁
参考例句:
  • She laid her hand on the latch of the door.她把手放在门闩上。
  • The repairman installed an iron latch on the door.修理工在门上安了铁门闩。


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