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首页 » 英文科幻小说 » 海底两万里 Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea » Part 1 Chapter 17
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Part 1 Chapter 17

WE HAD FINALLY arrived on the outskirts of this forest, surely one of the finest in Captain Nemo's immense domains. He regarded it as his own and had laid the same claim to it that, in the first days of the world, the first men had to their forests on land. Besides, who else could dispute his ownership of this underwater property? What other, bolder pioneer would come, ax in hand, to clear away its dark underbrush?

This forest was made up of big treelike plants, and when we entered beneath their huge arches, my eyes were instantly struck by the unique arrangement of their branches--an arrangement that I had never before encountered.

None of the weeds carpeting the seafloor, none of the branches bristling from the shrubbery, crept, or leaned, or stretched on a horizontal plane. They all rose right up toward the surface of the ocean. Every filament or ribbon, no matter how thin, stood ramrod straight. Fucus plants and creepers were growing in stiff perpendicular lines, governed by the density of the element that generated them. After I parted them with my hands, these otherwise motionless plants would shoot right back to their original positions. It was the regime of verticality.

I soon grew accustomed to this bizarre arrangement, likewise to the comparative darkness surrounding us. The seafloor in this forest was strewn with sharp chunks of stone that were hard to avoid. Here the range of underwater flora seemed pretty comprehensive to me, as well as more abundant than it might have been in the arctic or tropical zones, where such exhibits are less common. But for a few minutes I kept accidentally confusing the two kingdoms, mistaking zoophytes for water plants, animals for vegetables. And who hasn't made the same blunder? Flora and fauna are so closely associated in the underwater world!

I observed that all these exhibits from the vegetable kingdom were attached to the seafloor by only the most makeshift methods. They had no roots and didn't care which solid objects secured them, sand, shells, husks, or pebbles; they didn't ask their hosts for sustenance, just a point of purchase. These plants are entirely self-propagating, and the principle of their existence lies in the water that sustains and nourishes them. In place of leaves, most of them sprouted blades of unpredictable shape, which were confined to a narrow gamut of colors consisting only of pink, crimson, green, olive, tan, and brown. There I saw again, but not yet pressed and dried like the Nautilus's specimens, some peacock's tails spread open like fans to stir up a cooling breeze, scarlet rosetangle, sea tangle stretching out their young and edible shoots, twisting strings of kelp from the genus Nereocystis that bloomed to a height of fifteen meters, bouquets of mermaid's cups whose stems grew wider at the top, and a number of other open-sea plants, all without flowers. "It's an odd anomaly in this bizarre element!" as one witty naturalist puts it. "The animal kingdom blossoms, and the vegetable kingdom doesn't!"

These various types of shrubbery were as big as trees in the temperate zones; in the damp shade between them, there were clustered actual bushes of moving flowers, hedges of zoophytes in which there grew stony coral striped with twisting furrows, yellowish sea anemone from the genus Caryophylia with translucent tentacles, plus anemone with grassy tufts from the genus Zoantharia; and to complete the illusion, minnows flitted from branch to branch like a swarm of hummingbirds, while there rose underfoot, like a covey of snipe, yellow fish from the genus Lepisocanthus with bristling jaws and sharp scales, flying gurnards, and pinecone fish.

Near one o'clock, Captain Nemo gave the signal to halt. Speaking for myself, I was glad to oblige, and we stretched out beneath an arbor of winged kelp, whose long thin tendrils stood up like arrows.

This short break was a delight. It lacked only the charm of conversation. But it was impossible to speak, impossible to reply. I simply nudged my big copper headpiece against Conseil's headpiece. I saw a happy gleam in the gallant lad's eyes, and to communicate his pleasure, he jiggled around inside his carapace in the world's silliest way.

After four hours of strolling, I was quite astonished not to feel any intense hunger. What kept my stomach in such a good mood I'm unable to say. But, in exchange, I experienced that irresistible desire for sleep that comes over every diver. Accordingly, my eyes soon closed behind their heavy glass windows and I fell into an uncontrollable doze, which until then I had been able to fight off only through the movements of our walking. Captain Nemo and his muscular companion were already stretched out in this clear crystal, setting us a fine naptime example.

How long I was sunk in this torpor I cannot estimate; but when I awoke, it seemed as if the sun were settling toward the horizon. Captain Nemo was already up, and I had started to stretch my limbs, when an unexpected apparition brought me sharply to my feet.

A few paces away, a monstrous, meter-high sea spider was staring at me with beady eyes, poised to spring at me. Although my diving suit was heavy enough to protect me from this animal's bites, I couldn't keep back a shudder of horror. Just then Conseil woke up, together with the Nautilus's sailor. Captain Nemo alerted his companion to this hideous crustacean, which a swing of the rifle butt quickly brought down, and I watched the monster's horrible legs writhing in dreadful convulsions.

This encounter reminded me that other, more daunting animals must be lurking in these dark reaches, and my diving suit might not be adequate protection against their attacks. Such thoughts hadn't previously crossed my mind, and I was determined to keep on my guard. Meanwhile I had assumed this rest period would be the turning point in our stroll, but I was mistaken; and instead of heading back to the Nautilus, Captain Nemo continued his daring excursion.

The seafloor kept sinking, and its significantly steeper slope took us to greater depths. It must have been nearly three o'clock when we reached a narrow valley gouged between high, vertical walls and located 150 meters down. Thanks to the perfection of our equipment, we had thus gone ninety meters below the limit that nature had, until then, set on man's underwater excursions.

I say 150 meters, although I had no instruments for estimating this distance. But I knew that the sun's rays, even in the clearest seas, could reach no deeper. So at precisely this point the darkness became profound. Not a single object was visible past ten paces. Consequently, I had begun to grope my way when suddenly I saw the glow of an intense white light. Captain Nemo had just activated his electric device. His companion did likewise. Conseil and I followed suit. By turning a switch, I established contact between the induction coil and the glass spiral, and the sea, lit up by our four lanterns, was illuminated for a radius of twenty-five meters.

Captain Nemo continued to plummet into the dark depths of this forest, whose shrubbery grew ever more sparse. I observed that vegetable life was disappearing more quickly than animal life. The open-sea plants had already left behind the increasingly arid seafloor, where a prodigious number of animals were still swarming: zoophytes, articulates, mollusks, and fish.

While we were walking, I thought the lights of our Ruhmkorff devices would automatically attract some inhabitants of these dark strata. But if they did approach us, at least they kept at a distance regrettable from the hunter's standpoint. Several times I saw Captain Nemo stop and take aim with his rifle; then, after sighting down its barrel for a few seconds, he would straighten up and resume his walk.

Finally, at around four o'clock, this marvelous excursion came to an end. A wall of superb rocks stood before us, imposing in its sheer mass: a pile of gigantic stone blocks, an enormous granite cliffside pitted with dark caves but not offering a single gradient we could climb up. This was the underpinning of Crespo Island. This was land.

The captain stopped suddenly. A gesture from him brought us to a halt, and however much I wanted to clear this wall, I had to stop. Here ended the domains of Captain Nemo. He had no desire to pass beyond them. Farther on lay a part of the globe he would no longer tread underfoot.

Our return journey began. Captain Nemo resumed the lead in our little band, always heading forward without hesitation. I noted that we didn't follow the same path in returning to the Nautilus. This new route, very steep and hence very arduous, quickly took us close to the surface of the sea. But this return to the upper strata wasn't so sudden that decompression took place too quickly, which could have led to serious organic disorders and given us those internal injuries so fatal to divers. With great promptness, the light reappeared and grew stronger; and the refraction of the sun, already low on the horizon, again ringed the edges of various objects with the entire color spectrum.

At a depth of ten meters, we walked amid a swarm of small fish from every species, more numerous than birds in the air, more agile too; but no aquatic game worthy of a gunshot had yet been offered to our eyes.

Just then I saw the captain's weapon spring to his shoulder and track a moving object through the bushes. A shot went off, I heard a faint hissing, and an animal dropped a few paces away, literally struck by lightning.

It was a magnificent sea otter from the genus Enhydra, the only exclusively marine quadruped. One and a half meters long, this otter had to be worth a good high price. Its coat, chestnut brown above and silver below, would have made one of those wonderful fur pieces so much in demand in the Russian and Chinese markets; the fineness and luster of its pelt guaranteed that it would go for at least 2,000 francs. I was full of wonderment at this unusual mammal, with its circular head adorned by short ears, its round eyes, its white whiskers like those on a cat, its webbed and clawed feet, its bushy tail. Hunted and trapped by fishermen, this valuable carnivore has become extremely rare, and it takes refuge chiefly in the northernmost parts of the Pacific, where in all likelihood its species will soon be facing extinction.

Captain Nemo's companion picked up the animal, loaded it on his shoulder, and we took to the trail again.

For an hour plains of sand unrolled before our steps. Often the seafloor rose to within two meters of the surface of the water. I could then see our images clearly mirrored on the underside of the waves, but reflected upside down: above us there appeared an identical band that duplicated our every movement and gesture; in short, a perfect likeness of the quartet near which it walked, but with heads down and feet in the air.

Another unusual effect. Heavy clouds passed above us, forming and fading swiftly. But after thinking it over, I realized that these so-called clouds were caused simply by the changing densities of the long ground swells, and I even spotted the foaming "white caps" that their breaking crests were proliferating over the surface of the water. Lastly, I couldn't help seeing the actual shadows of large birds passing over our heads, swiftly skimming the surface of the sea.

On this occasion I witnessed one of the finest gunshots ever to thrill the marrow of a hunter. A large bird with a wide wingspan, quite clearly visible, approached and hovered over us. When it was just a few meters above the waves, Captain Nemo's companion took aim and fired. The animal dropped, electrocuted, and its descent brought it within reach of our adroit hunter, who promptly took possession of it. It was an albatross of the finest species, a wonderful specimen of these open-sea fowl.

This incident did not interrupt our walk. For two hours we were sometimes led over plains of sand, sometimes over prairies of seaweed that were quite arduous to cross. In all honesty, I was dead tired by the time I spotted a hazy glow half a mile away, cutting through the darkness of the waters. It was the Nautilus's beacon. Within twenty minutes we would be on board, and there I could breathe easy again--because my tank's current air supply seemed to be quite low in oxygen. But I was reckoning without an encounter that slightly delayed our arrival.

I was lagging behind some twenty paces when I saw Captain Nemo suddenly come back toward me. With his powerful hands he sent me buckling to the ground, while his companion did the same to Conseil. At first I didn't know what to make of this sudden assault, but I was reassured to observe the captain lying motionless beside me.

I was stretched out on the seafloor directly beneath some bushes of algae, when I raised my head and spied two enormous masses hurtling by, throwing off phosphorescent glimmers.

My blood turned cold in my veins! I saw that we were under threat from a fearsome pair of sharks. They were blue sharks, dreadful man-eaters with enormous tails, dull, glassy stares, and phosphorescent matter oozing from holes around their snouts. They were like monstrous fireflies that could thoroughly pulverize a man in their iron jaws! I don't know if Conseil was busy with their classification, but as for me, I looked at their silver bellies, their fearsome mouths bristling with teeth, from a viewpoint less than scientific-- more as a victim than as a professor of natural history.

Luckily these voracious animals have poor eyesight. They went by without noticing us, grazing us with their brownish fins; and miraculously, we escaped a danger greater than encountering a tiger deep in the jungle.

Half an hour later, guided by its electric trail, we reached the Nautilus. The outside door had been left open, and Captain Nemo closed it after we reentered the first cell. Then he pressed a button. I heard pumps operating within the ship, I felt the water lowering around me, and in a few moments the cell was completely empty. The inside door opened, and we passed into the wardrobe.

There our diving suits were removed, not without difficulty; and utterly exhausted, faint from lack of food and rest, I repaired to my stateroom, full of wonder at this startling excursion on the bottom of the sea.

我们到底走到森林的边缘了,这可能是尼摩船长的广大领土中最美好的一处。他把森林看作是他的,他把森林的所有权归他自己,像世界开辟的时候,最初出现的一批人霸占所有权一样。其实,又有谁能够跟他争这海底财产的所有权呢?哪有比他更大胆的开荒者,手拿着斧子,敢来这里砍伐荆棘,开垦田地呢?

这森林中生长的都是高大的木本植物,当我们走到树,林中间阔大的拱形枝干之下,我的眼光首先就被林中树枝排列的奇特形状所吸引,感到奇怪的是这种形状,我从来没有看见过。

林中地上并没有生长什么草,小树上丛生的枝权没有一根向外蔓延,也不弯曲垂下,也不向横的方面伸展。所有草木都笔直伸向洋面。没有枝条,没有叶带,不管怎么细小,都是笔直的,像铁杆一般。海带和水藻,受到海水强大密度的影响,坚定不移地沿着垂直线生长。而且这些水草叉是静止不动的,当我用手分开它们的时候,一放手,它们立即回复原来的笔直状态。这林子简直就是垂直线的世界。

不久我便看惯了这种古怪的形状,同时也习惯了我们四周的相对的黑暗环境。林中地上随处有尖利的石块,很不容易躲开。海底植物,据我看,在这里是应有尽有了,比产量较少的南北两极地带或热带区域,可能更为丰富。不过,在几分钟内,我不知不觉地把动植物两类混淆起来,把植虫动物当做水产植物,把动物当做植物。本来,谁能不弄错呢?在海底下,动物界和植物界是十分接近的:

我观察到,所有这里的植物界产品,跟土壤只是表面上连接起来。它们没有根,支持它们的不管是固体、是沙、是贝、是甲壳或石子,都没有什么影响,它们所要求的只是一个支点,而不是借以生长购力量。这些植物只是自己发展起来,它们生存的唯一资源就是那维持它们和滋养它们的海水。它们大部分不长叶子,只长出奇形怪状的小片,表面的色彩很有限,只有玫瑰红、洋红、青绿、青黄、灰褐、古铜等颜:色。我在这里又看到的,不是像在诺第留斯号船上风干的标本,而是恬生生的、似乎迎凤招展地作扇子般展开的孔雀彩贝,大红的陶瓷贝,伸长像可食的嫩笋一样的片形贝。细长柔软,一直长到十五米高的古铜藻,茎在顶上长大的一束一柬瓶形水草,以及其他许多的海产植物,通通没有花。一位很风趣的生物学家曾说过:“动物类开花,植物类不开花,大海真是奇异例外的环境,古怪新奇的自然!”

在这些像温带树木一般高大的各种不同的灌木中间,在它们的湿润的荫影下面,遍生着带有生动花朵的真正丛林,植虫动物的篱笆行列,上面像花一般开放出弯曲条纹的脑纹状珊瑚,触须透明的黑黄石竹珊瑚,草地上一堆一堆的石花珊瑚——为了使这个幻觉完整无缺一又有蝇鱼,它们像成群的蜂雀,从这枝飞到那枝,至于两腮耸起、鳞甲尖利的麦虫鱼,飞鱼,单鳍鱼,那简直就像一群鹌鹑,在我们脚下跳来跳去。

到一点钟左右,尼摩船长发出暂时休息的信号。在我来说,我很高兴能休息一下,我们于是在一个海草华盖下面躺下来,这海草的细长枝条像箭一般直插着。

这一刻的休息我觉得很舒服,美中不足的是我们不能彼此交谈。没有法子说话,当然也没有法子回答。我仅仅把我粗大的铜头挨近康塞尔的铜头。我看见了这老实人的眼睛闪出兴奋的亮光,又为表示满意起见,他在铜壳子里面乱摇乱摆,作最滑稽可笑的怪样子。

虽然走了四小时的路,我并不感到有吃东西的需要,心里很为惊异。为什么会这样,我说不出来。但另一方面,像“所有潜水人一样,我感到很想睡觉,没有法子克制。所以我的眼睛也就在很厚的玻璃后面闭起来,我立即掉到无法克制的昏睡中,这昏睡,刚才也只是靠向前的走动才暂时制止了它。尼摩船长和他的壮健同伴,早就躺在清澈的水晶体中,先给我们作出睡眠的榜样了。

我沉迷在这种昏睡中有多少时候,那我不能估计;但当我醒来的时候,看看太阳已经向西边低下去了。尼摩船长已经站起来,我也开始伸展我的四肢,就在这个时候,出现一件意外的东西,我立即站起两脚。

离我们几步远的地方,有一只高一米的梅蜘蛛,斜着眼注视我,就要向我身上扑来。虽然我的潜水衣相当厚重,可以保护我不会被它咬伤,但我也不能不害怕,不能不颤抖。康塞尔和诺第留斯号的水手就在这个时候醒来。尼摩船长把这个怕人的甲壳类动物指给他的同伴看,他的同伴一枪托打死了它,我看见这个怪物的丑陋脚爪作怕人的抽搐,拼命挣扎。

这次碰见这个怪物就使我想到一定还有其他更可怕的动物时常到这黑沉沉的海底下来,我的潜水衣可能无力保护我,无法抵抗它们的袭击。我起先没有想到这事,现在我决心要时刻警惕。此外,我又以为这次休息是我们这次旅行的结束,但我错了,尼摩船长并不让我们回到船上去,仍然继续他的大胆的旅行。

地面总是往下陷,斜度更是明显,把我们拉到最深的海底。这时候,想是快要到三点了,我们到了一座狭小的山谷中,这山谷在峭壁间,在一百五十米深的海底下。由于我们使用的器械极完善,我们可以超越好像大自然拿来限制人的在海底旅行不得超过丸十米的深度。

我说我们是在一百五十米的深度;虽然没有什么器械可以让我测量,但我知道,即最清澈的海水,阳光也不能再往下照了。正是在这时候,周围变得漆黑。在十步外什么也看不见。所以我只能摸索着走,这时我看见一道相当明亮的白光忽然闪出来。原来是尼摩船长使用他的电光机器。他的同伴照他那样做。康塞尔和我也学着他们的榜样。我转动螺丝钉,使电磁铁跟曲玻璃管接通,灯亮了,海中有我们四盏探照灯的照射,周围二十五米内都明亮起来。

尼摩船长继续走人森林中最幽深的地方,沿途树木渐渐稀少。我注意到,在海底,植物界要比动物界消失得早些。海产植物虽然已经放弃了这些变为贫瘠的土地,但数量很多的动物、植虫动物、节肢动物、软体动物和鱼类仍然到处皆是。

我一边走一边想,我们带的兰可夫灯的灯光必然要引起那些沉黑的海底下居民的注意,齐集前来。可是,它们虽然前来,但总是留在猎人力量不可及,距离相当远的地方。好几次,我看见尼摩船长停步,瞄准他的枪,但经过一些时候的观察后,他又把枪放下,再向前行。

后来,大约四点钟左右的时候,新奇惊人的旅行结束了。一道高大的岩石墙和一大堆怪石群矗立在我们面前,那是巨人般的岩石层,花岗石的悬崖,沉黑的岩洞,可是看不见有可以攀爬上去的路径。

这是克利斯波岛的尽头,是陆地了。

尼摩船长突然停住脚步。他向我们打手势,要我们停下来,我虽然很想穿过这道墙,但我不能不止步,这里是尼摩船长的领地的最后界限。他不愿意走过这界限。过这界限便是他的脚步不愿踩踏的地球的陆地部分了。

我们于是开始往回走。尼摩船长又在前面带领他的小。。小队伍,他总是毫不迟疑地向前走。我觉得,我们转回诺第留斯号船上去,好像不是走原来的路。这条新路很陡,因此:很难走,显然它是比较接近海面。不过,回到海水上层的行动不能十分突然,防止压力的减小不要过急,因为压力减Jy过急,可能在我们机体中引起严重的疾病,发生使潜水人有性命危险的身体内伤。所以我们是慢慢地上来。很快光线:又出现了,又扩大了,太阳已经在天际的低处,曲折作用重:新又把七色的光圈套在各种不同的物体上了。

在十米深的地方,我们就走在一大群各种各类的小鱼中间,比空中飞乌的数量还多,也更敏捷,但还没有值得我们枪击的水产猎物在我们眼前出现。

这时候,我看见船长的枪急急顶在肩上,对着丛林间一个正在走动的东西瞄准。枪响了,我听到轻微的啸声,那个动物在离几步远的地方被击中倒下来了。

倒下来的是一只很好看的水獭,一只水兽,它可能是住在海中的唯一的四足兽了。这水獭有一米半长,价值一定非常大。它的皮,表面是栗褐色,底面是银白色,可以制成十分好看的皮筒,在俄国和中国的市场上,是十分罕见的皮料。皮毛的柔软精细和它的光滑色泽决定它的价格至少也是二千法郎。我很赞美这新奇的哺乳类动物,圆突的头,上面有短短的耳朵,圆圆的眼睛,像猫须一般的白色瓮须,掌形带甲的脚,团簇的尾巴。这种珍贵的内食动物,因为渔人的追赶和捕获,现在已经十分稀罕,它们主要是躲藏在太平洋的北极圈里,就是在北极圈里,它们这一族也快要灭绝了。

尼摩船长的同伴跑上前去把水獭捡起来,放在肩头上,我们又向前走。

在一小时内,一片细沙的平原在我们脚下摆开。平原时常升至距海面不及两米的深度。我当时看见我们的影子反映在水中,清楚地现出来,方向正相反:在我们上面,现出同样的一群人,表演我们的动作和姿势,一切都相同,就是脑袋垂在下面,两脚倒悬在空中。

值得记下的还有另一种情况。一阵阵的浓云飞掠过去,这些云很快地形成,也很快地消失;但仔细一想,我明白,这些所谓云只不过是海底厚薄不一的波浪所反映出来的。我又看到浪头向下折落时演成无数泡沫飞溅的滚滚白祷,像羊群一样。我也见过那些在我们头上的巨大鸟类的阴影,它们从海面疾飞掠过。

这个时候,我亲眼看到一次射击,也许从来没有一个猎人曾经发射过这样准确、漂亮的枪。一只大鸟,可以看得很清楚,两翼张得很大的飞翔前来。尼摩船长的同伴看见大鸟在离水波仅仅几米的上面,尼摩就瞄准,射击。大鸟被击落下来,一直掉到这位敏捷的猎人的近旁,他立即把鸟捉住。这是最美丽的一种海鹅,海鸟中最使人赞美的一个鸟类品种。

我们走路并没有因打海鹅这件事中断。在两小时内,我们有时沿着细沙平原走,有时沿着藓苔草地走,相当难走。老实说,我实在不能再走了,这个时候,我看见半里远的地方,有一道模糊光线冲破了海水的沉黑。那是诺第留斯号的探照灯。要不了二十分钟,我们就可以上船了,一到船上,我便可以自由呼吸,因为我觉得我的空气储藏器好像只能供应我一些含氧很少的空气了。不过我这样打算,并没有估计到下面的意外遭遇,使我们耽搁了一些时间才到达船上。

我走在尼摩船长后面约二十步左右,看见尼摩船长突然向我面前转回来。他用他有力的手,把我按倒在地下,他的同伴对康塞尔也同样做。初时我对于这次突然的攻击,作种种的猜想,但我看见船长也躺在我近边,不敢动,心中就安然了。

我于是躺在地上,正好躲在藓苔丛林的后面,当我拾起头来,我看见有巨大无比的躯体发出磷光,气势汹汹地走过来。

我血管中的血都凝结了!我看见逼近我们的是十分厉害的鲛鱼,是一对火鲛,是最可怕的鲨鱼类,尾巴巨大,眼光呆板阴沉,嘴的周围有很多孔,孔中喷出磷质,闪闪发光。真是大得怕人的火鲛,它们的铁牙床,可以把整个人咬成肉酱!我不知道康塞尔是不是正在留心把它们分类,在我说来,我与其说是拿生物学者的身份,不如说是拿将被吞食的人的身份,很不科学的观点来观察它们的银白的肚腹,满是利牙的大嘴。

十分幸运,这对贪食的动物目力很差,看不太清楚。它们并没有看见我们就走过去了,只是它们的黄黑的尾巴略略触到我们,我们能躲过这次危险真像是个奇迹,毫无疑问,这次危险比在深林中碰见猛虎还要大得多。

半小时后,有电光引路,我们到达了诺第留斯号。外部的门仍然开着,尼摩船长一见我们都已经走进了第一个小房中后,就把门关起来。然后他手按一个圆钮;我听到船内部的抽水机活动起来,我觉得我周围的水渐渐低下去,过了一会儿,小房中的水便完全排出去了。内部的门打开来,我、们走进了储衣室。

在储衣室,我们把潜水衣脱下来,脱时当然要费些功夫;我非常疲乏,走回自己房中,一方面对于这次海底的惊:人旅行,眉飞色舞,赞叹不已,另一方面,简直累得不能动,躺在床上昏昏沉沉地睡着了。



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