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Book 1 Chapter 3 Monsieur The Cardinal

Poor Gringoire! the din1 of all the great double petards of the Saint-Jean, the discharge of twenty arquebuses on supports, the detonation2 of that famous serpentine3 of the Tower of Billy, which, during the siege of Paris, on Sunday, the twenty-sixth of September, 1465, killed seven Burgundians at one blow, the explosion of all the powder stored at the gate of the Temple, would have rent his ears less rudely at that solemn and dramatic moment, than these few words, which fell from the lips of the usher4, "His eminence5, Monseigneur the Cardinal6 de Bourbon."

It is not that Pierre Gringoire either feared or disdained7 monsieur the cardinal. He had neither the weakness nor the audacity9 for that. A true eclectic, as it would be expressed nowadays, Gringoire was one of those firm and lofty, moderate and calm spirits, which always know how to bear themselves amid all circumstances (~stare in dimidio rerum~), and who are full of reason and of liberal philosophy, while still setting store by cardinals10. A rare, precious, and never interrupted race of philosophers to whom wisdom, like another Ariadne, seems to have given a clew of thread which they have been walking along unwinding since the beginning of the world, through the labyrinth11 of human affairs. One finds them in all ages, ever the same; that is to say, always according to all times. And, without reckoning our Pierre Gringoire, who may represent them in the fifteenth century if we succeed in bestowing12 upon him the distinction which he deserves, it certainly was their spirit which animated13 Father du Breul, when he wrote, in the sixteenth, these naively14 sublime15 words, worthy16 of all centuries: "I am a Parisian by nation, and a Parrhisian in language, for ~parrhisia~ in Greek signifies liberty of speech; of which I have made use even towards messeigneurs the cardinals, uncle and brother to Monsieur the Prince de Conty, always with respect to their greatness, and without offending any one of their suite17, which is much to say."

There was then neither hatred18 for the cardinal, nor disdain8 for his presence, in the disagreeable impression produced upon Pierre Gringoire. Quite the contrary; our poet had too much good sense and too threadbare a coat, not to attach particular importance to having the numerous allusions19 in his prologue20, and, in particular, the glorification21 of the dauphin, son of the Lion of France, fall upon the most eminent22 ear. But it is not interest which predominates in the noble nature of poets. I suppose that the entity23 of the poet may be represented by the number ten; it is certain that a chemist on analyzing24 and pharmacopolizing it, as Rabelais says, would find it composed of one part interest to nine parts of self-esteem.

Now, at the moment when the door had opened to admit the cardinal, the nine parts of self-esteem in Gringoire, swollen25 and expanded by the breath of popular admiration26, were in a state of prodigious27 augmentation, beneath which disappeared, as though stifled28, that imperceptible molecule29 of which we have just remarked upon in the constitution of poets; a precious ingredient, by the way, a ballast of reality and humanity, without which they would not touch the earth. Gringoire enjoyed seeing, feeling, fingering, so to speak an entire assembly (of knaves30, it is true, but what matters that ?) stupefied, petrified31, and as though asphyxiated32 in the presence of the incommensurable tirades33 which welled up every instant from all parts of his bridal song. I affirm that he shared the general beatitude, and that, quite the reverse of La Fontaine, who, at the presentation of his comedy of the "Florentine," asked, "Who is the ill-bred lout34 who made that rhapsody?" Gringoire would gladly have inquired of his neighbor, "Whose masterpiece is this?"

The reader can now judge of the effect produced upon him by the abrupt36 and unseasonable arrival of the cardinal.

That which he had to fear was only too fully37 realized. The entrance of his eminence upset the audience. All heads turned towards the gallery. It was no longer possible to hear one's self. "The cardinal! The cardinal!" repeated all mouths. The unhappy prologue stopped short for the second time.

The cardinal halted for a moment on the threshold of the estrade. While he was sending a rather indifferent glance around the audience, the tumult38 redoubled. Each person wished to get a better view of him. Each man vied with the other in thrusting his head over his neighbor's shoulder.

He was, in fact, an exalted39 personage, the sight of whom was well worth any other comedy. Charles, Cardinal de Bourbon, Archbishop and Comte of Lyon, Primate41 of the Gauls, was allied42 both to Louis XI., through his brother, Pierre, Seigneur de Beaujeu, who had married the king's eldest43 daughter, and to Charles the Bold through his mother, Agnes of Burgundy. Now, the dominating trait, the peculiar44 and distinctive45 trait of the character of the Primate of the Gauls, was the spirit of the courtier, and devotion to the powers that be. The reader can form an idea of the numberless embarrassments46 which this double relationship had caused him, and of all the temporal reefs among which his spiritual bark had been forced to tack47, in order not to suffer shipwreck48 on either Louis or Charles, that Scylla and that Charybdis which had devoured49 the Duc de Nemours and the Constable50 de Saint-Pol. Thanks to Heaven's mercy, he had made the voyage successfully, and had reached home without hindrance51. But although he was in port, and precisely52 because he was in port, he never recalled without disquiet53 the varied54 haps35 of his political career, so long uneasy and laborious55. Thus, he was in the habit of saying that the year 1476 had been "white and black" for him--meaning thereby56, that in the course of that year he had lost his mother, the Duchesse de la Bourbonnais, and his cousin, the Duke of Burgundy, and that one grief had consoled him for the other.

Nevertheless, he was a fine man; he led a joyous57 cardinal's life, liked to enliven himself with the royal vintage of Challuau, did not hate Richarde la Garmoise and Thomasse la Saillarde, bestowed58 alms on pretty girls rather than on old women,--and for all these reasons was very agreeable to the populace of Paris. He never went about otherwise than surrounded by a small court of bishops59 and abbés of high lineage, gallant60, jovial61, and given to carousing62 on occasion; and more than once the good and devout63 women of Saint Germain d' Auxerre, when passing at night beneath the brightly illuminated64 windows of Bourbon, had been scandalized to hear the same voices which had intoned vespers for them during the day carolling, to the clinking of glasses, the bacchic proverb of Benedict XII., that pope who had added a third crown to the Tiara--~Bibamus papaliter~.

It was this justly acquired popularity, no doubt, which preserved him on his entrance from any bad reception at the hands of the mob, which had been so displeased65 but a moment before, and very little disposed to respect a cardinal on the very day when it was to elect a pope. But the Parisians cherish little rancor66; and then, having forced the beginning of the play by their authority, the good bourgeois67 had got the upper hand of the cardinal, and this triumph was sufficient for them. Moreover, the Cardinal de Bourbon was a handsome man,--he wore a fine scarlet68 robe, which he carried off very well,--that is to say, he had all the women on his side, and, consequently, the best half of the audience. Assuredly, it would be injustice69 and bad taste to hoot70 a cardinal for having come late to the spectacle, when he is a handsome man, and when he wears his scarlet robe well.

He entered, then, bowed to those present with the hereditary71 smile of the great for the people, and directed his course slowly towards his scarlet velvet72 arm-chair, with the air of thinking of something quite different. His cortege--what we should nowadays call his staff--of bishops and abbés invaded the estrade in his train, not without causing redoubled tumult and curiosity among the audience. Each man vied with his neighbor in pointing them out and naming them, in seeing who should recognize at least one of them: this one, the Bishop40 of Marseilles (Alaudet, if my memory serves me right);--this one, the primicier of Saint-Denis;--this one, Robert de Lespinasse, Abbé of Saint-Germain des Prés, that libertine73 brother of a mistress of Louis XI.; all with many errors and absurdities74. As for the scholars, they swore. This was their day, their feast of fools, their saturnalia, the annual orgy of the corporation of Law clerks and of the school. There was no turpitude75 which was not sacred on that day. And then there were gay gossips in the crowd--Simone Quatrelivres, Agnes la Gadine, and Rabine Piédebou. Was it not the least that one could do to swear at one's ease and revile76 the name of God a little, on so fine a day, in such good company as dignitaries of the church and loose women? So they did not abstain77; and, in the midst of the uproar78, there was a frightful79 concert of blasphemies80 and enormities of all the unbridled tongues, the tongues of clerks and students restrained during the rest of the year, by the fear of the hot iron of Saint Louis. Poor Saint Louis! how they set him at defiance81 in his own court of law! Each one of them selected from the new-comers on the platform, a black, gray, white, or violet cassock as his target. Joannes Frollo de Molendin, in his quality of brother to an archdeacon, boldly attacked the scarlet; he sang in deafening82 tones, with his impudent83 eyes fastened on the cardinal, "~Cappa repleta mero~!"

All these details which we here lay bare for the edification of the reader, were so covered by the general uproar, that they were lost in it before reaching the reserved platforms; moreover, they would have moved the cardinal but little, so much a part of the customs were the liberties of that day. Moreover, he had another cause for solicitude84, and his mien85 as wholly preoccupied86 with it, which entered the estrade the same time as himself; this was the embassy from Flanders.

Not that he was a profound politician, nor was he borrowing trouble about the possible consequences of the marriage of his cousin Marguerite de Bourgoyne to his cousin Charles, Dauphin de Vienne; nor as to how long the good understanding which had been patched up between the Duke of Austria and the King of France would last; nor how the King of England would take this disdain of his daughter. All that troubled him but little; and he gave a warm reception every evening to the wine of the royal vintage of Chaillot, without a suspicion that several flasks87 of that same wine (somewhat revised and corrected, it is true, by Doctor Coictier), cordially offered to Edward IV. by Louis XI., would, some fine morning, rid Louis XI. of Edward IV. "The much honored embassy of Monsieur the Duke of Austria," brought the cardinal none of these cares, but it troubled him in another direction. It was, in fact, somewhat hard, and we have already hinted at it on the second page of this book,--for him, Charles de Bourbon, to be obliged to feast and receive cordially no one knows what bourgeois;--for him, a cardinal, to receive aldermen;--for him, a Frenchman, and a jolly companion, to receive Flemish beer-drinkers,--and that in public! This was, certainly, one of the most irksome grimaces88 that he had ever executed for the good pleasure of the king.

So he turned toward the door, and with the best grace in the world (so well had he trained himself to it), when the usher announced, in a sonorous89 voice, "Messieurs the Envoys90 of Monsieur the Duke of Austria." It is useless to add that the whole hall did the same.

Then arrived, two by two, with a gravity which made a contrast in the midst of the frisky91 ecclesiastical escort of Charles de Bourbon, the eight and forty ambassadors of Maximilian of Austria, having at their head the reverend Father in God, Jehan, Abbot of Saint-Bertin, Chancellor92 of the Golden Fleece, and Jacques de Goy, Sieur Dauby, Grand Bailiff of Ghent. A deep silence settled over the assembly, accompanied by stifled laughter at the preposterous93 names and all the bourgeois designations which each of these personages transmitted with imperturbable94 gravity to the usher, who then tossed names and titles pell-mell and mutilated to the crowd below. There were Master Loys Roelof, alderman of the city of Louvain; Messire Clays d'Etuelde, alderman of Brussels; Messire Paul de Baeust, Sieur de Voirmizelle, President of Flanders; Master Jehan Coleghens, burgomaster of the city of Antwerp; Master George de la Moere, first alderman of the kuere of the city of Ghent; Master Gheldolf van der Hage, first alderman of the ~parchous~ of the said town; and the Sieur de Bierbecque, and Jehan Pinnock, and Jehan Dymaerzelle, etc., etc., etc.; bailiffs, aldermen, burgomasters; burgomasters, aldermen, bailiffs--all stiff, affectedly95 grave, formal, dressed out in velvet and damask, hooded96 with caps of black velvet, with great tufts of Cyprus gold thread; good Flemish heads, after all, severe and worthy faces, of the family which Rembrandt makes to stand out so strong and grave from the black background of his "Night Patrol "; personages all of whom bore, written on their brows, that Maximilian of Austria had done well in "trusting implicitly," as the manifest ran, "in their sense, valor97, experience, loyalty98, and good wisdom."

There was one exception, however. It was a subtle, intelligent, crafty-looking face, a sort of combined monkey and diplomat99 phiz, before whom the cardinal made three steps and a profound bow, and whose name, nevertheless, was only, "Guillaume Rym, counsellor and pensioner100 of the City of Ghent."

Few persons were then aware who Guillaume Rym was. A rare genius who in a time of revolution would have made a brilliant appearance on the surface of events, but who in the fifteenth century was reduced to cavernous intrigues101, and to "living in mines," as the Duc de Saint-Simon expresses it. Nevertheless, he was appreciated by the "miner" of Europe; he plotted familiarly with Louis XI., and often lent a hand to the king's secret jobs. All which things were quite unknown to that throng102, who were amazed at the cardinal's politeness to that frail103 figure of a Flemish bailiff.

 

可怜的甘果瓦!无论是圣·若望的双料大爆竹发出的声响,二十支火绳枪的放射,比里炮塔上著名的古炮的射击(在一四六五年九月二十九日那个巴黎被围的星期天,这种古炮一炮就打死了七个庇卡底人),或者是庙门贮存的弹药的爆炸,在这个庄严的激动人心的时候,都不会象从守门人嘴里说出的“波旁红衣主教大人到” 这几个字那样震动他的耳朵。

并不是甘果瓦畏惧或者看不起红衣主教,他既没有这种懦弱也没有这种傲慢,用我们现今的话来说,他是那些人里的一个,他们具有高尚、坚决、中庸、温和的精神,永远懂得站在一切的中央,有着满脑子的理智和自由主义的哲学思想,同时又是十分尊敬红衣主教的折衷主义者。哲学家是属于高贵的永不绝灭的种族,象另一位亚里安娜一样,智慧也好象给了他们一团线,使他们从洪荒时代开始,就能顺着线球穿过人类事物的迷宫。在任何时代都可以找到这类人,他们总是一样的,这就是说,他们总是能适应一切时代的,除开我们的甘果瓦不算,假若我们可以把他应得的这份声誉归在他身上的话。他在十五世纪可能是他们的代表。确实是他们的这种精神鼓舞了杜·布厄尔神甫,使他在十六世纪写出了这些永远值得流传下去的话:“我在籍贯上是个巴黎人,说起话来是个自由论者,因为巴黎人这个词在希腊文中就是自由讲话的意思。我甚至把这个词用到红衣主教大人们和太子贡蒂殿下的叔父和弟兄身上,同时对他们的高贵怀着敬意,不得罪他们的任何一位侍从,而他们的侍从相当多呢。”

那么,使比埃尔·甘果瓦不愉快的,并不是他对于红衣主教的怨恨,也不是轻视他的莅临。正好相反,我们的诗人有着过多的良知和太破的上衣,他并不特别担心他的序幕里隐喻太多,更不怕他对法兰西狮王的称颂会给那高贵的耳朵听见。但是人们高贵的天性中占优势的并不是兴致,我猜想,诗人们的天性可以用“十”这个数字来表现。假若我们让化学家来分析,就象拉伯雷所说,那就一定会发现其中只有十分之一是兴致,而十分之九是自尊心。可是当大门为红衣主教打开的时候,甘果瓦那在一致赞赏的气氛里膨胀起来的十分之九的自尊心,就变成了一种深深的狂热,致使我们刚才在诗人们的天性中指出的那种兴致,仿佛给窒息了似的消失得半点不剩了。此外这一兴致也是一种可贵的组成部分,诗人如缺少这种对现实和人类的感情,便无从和大地建立联系。甘果瓦能高兴地去感到看到和接触到全体观众(其实这是一些无赖),但那又有什么关系呢?他们好象被贺婚诗里到处出现的长篇大论窒息了,惊呆了。我敢断定他自己也分享着观众的这份福气,他可不象拉封丹在自己的喜剧《佛罗伦斯人》首次公演时问道:“这狂乱的诗章是哪个低劣的作者写的?”甘果瓦倒很想问问他身边的人:“这是谁的杰作?”

现在你可以想象红衣主教的突然到来对他产生了什么影响了。

他很有理由担心发生的事,却过早地发生了。红衣主教阁下的进场使观众的情绪激动起来,所有的脑袋都朝看台转过去。听不见别的,只听见大家重复地喊:“红衣主教!红衣主教!”不幸的序幕又一次被打断了。

红衣主教在看台的门槛上停留了一会,他相当傲慢地朝观众看了一眼,吵嚷声就更厉害起来。每一个人都希望更清楚地看到他,都把头抬得比旁边的人更高些,都朝他看着。

他的确是一位出众的人物,看他比看任何喜剧都值得。查理是波旁的红衣主教,里昂的大主教和伯爵,高卢的首席主教,他还因为哥哥——波热的贵族比埃尔——娶了路易十一的长女,而和国王有了姻戚关系。又因他母亲阿涅丝·德·勃艮第,使他又和勇敢的查理有姻戚关系。这位高卢的首席主教性格里的鲜明特点,就是具有弄臣的精神和对于权势的虔敬。为了使自己不至于同路易或查理弄得关系破裂——这种关系很象曾经使纳姆公爵和圣波尔元帅覆没的沙西德漩涡与锡拉岩礁一样——,你就可以想象出这双重关系给予他的无数阻碍,以及他的精神的船只必须从其间通过的那些岩礁了。

谢天谢地,他总算免于覆没,一无阻碍地到达了罗马。他虽然已经到达港岸,而且正因为已经在岸上,每当他想起在相当长的政治生活中的种种惊险的遭遇,内心还是不能平静。讲起一四七六年,他照例总是说那对于他是“既白且黑的”,意思是说他在那一年里失去了他的母亲波旁公爵夫人和他的表兄勃艮第公爵,不过这一种哀伤由于另一种而得到了安慰。

但他是个好人,他愉快地度着他的红衣主教的生涯,喜欢在莎里约王室葡萄园游玩,不憎恨理查德·拉卡尔玛和多玛斯·拉沙雅德,给少女们的布施比给老妇们的多些。由于这一切,他是受巴黎公众欢迎的。红衣主教无论到哪里去,身边总是围绕着一小群血统高贵的主教和神甫,他们都是又文雅又轻佻,而且喜欢宴饮。圣日尔曼·多克塞尔的虔诚信徒们在黄昏时分经过波旁府邸那些灯火辉煌的窗子时,不止一次听见那黄昏前给他们唱晚祷歌的声音混在一阵玻璃杯相碰的声音里,唱着曾经三次加冕的教皇伯努瓦十二世的酒神颂,这使他们非常反感。

毫无疑问,正是由于他那身分和声名,人们在他进来的时候就把恶意的表示压制住了。他们在一会儿以前还很不高兴,并不认为应当在选举愚人王的日子里对红衣主教表示敬意。但巴黎人是很不善于怀恨的,何况由于权威性的戏剧提前开演了,好心的公民们已经占了红衣主教的上风,这就使他们很满意了。何况波旁的红衣主教先生是一个美男子,很整齐地穿着非常漂亮的红色长袍,这就是说他赢得了全体妇女,也就是一半观众的好感。由于红衣主教在戏演了好一会儿才到场就去责骂他,那可是不妥当的,恶劣的,既然他是一位美男子,而且还端整地穿着他的红袍子。

他进来了,带着大人物面对公众时照例有的微笑向观众行了礼,慢慢移步走向他那张铺着华丽的天鹅绒的靠椅,神色显得完全心不在焉。在他走上看台的当儿,跟在他身后的随员们,即我们如今称之为智囊团的那些主教和神甫们,更加引起了厅堂里观众的骚动和好奇。每个人都乐于指点他们,说出他们的姓名,他们至少认识其中的一个:那一位是马赛的主教阿罗丹先生,假若我记得不错;那一位是圣德尼的副主教;那一位是圣日尔曼·代·勃雷教堂的神甫罗贝尔·德·内斯比纳斯,路易十一的某个情妇的放荡的兄弟。

他们说时,差不多全都用的是轻视的口吻和刺耳的声调。至于大学生们,他们是骂声不绝。因为这是他们的日子呀,这是他们的愚人节,是他们纵情狂欢的日子,是大理院书记团和学校一年一度的大摆筵席的日子呀。在这个日子里,任何胡闹都是被允许而且被认为是神圣不可侵犯的。何况这群人中间还有几个愚蠢的饶舌的女人:西蒙娜·加特里芙、阿涅丝·拉加丁和罗宾娜·比埃德布。在这个美妙的日子里,同教会里的人以及荡妇们在一起,他们不是至少可以随便赌咒发誓和骂骂上帝么?在一片嘈杂声中,从那些舌头上滑出了大量可怕的辱骂和谬论,这些青年和大学生的舌头,在一年的其余日子都是害怕圣路易的炮烙酷刑的。倒霉的圣路易!人们在他的司法宫里对他表现出怎样的轻视!看台上其他新到的人,各穿一件灰色、白色或紫色的长袍。

至于若望·孚罗洛·德·梅朗狄诺,因为他是一位副主教的老弟,就大胆地穿了一件大红色的。他把眼睛盯着红衣主教,用最高的嗓门唱道:“浸透了美酒的袍子呀!”

我们在此用详细描述来帮助读者了解的这些情景,都被一片喧哗声遮盖着,看台上的人并没有注意到。既然自由行动在这一天照例是被允许的,红衣主教也就不怎么在乎,何况他还有一桩挂心的事儿使他显得心事重重,那就是弗朗德勒的使臣们,他们紧跟在他后面,几乎同他一起来到了看台上。

他并不是一个城府很深的政治家,他并不考虑他的表妹玛格丽特·德·勃艮第夫人同他的堂兄,维埃纳省的太子查理殿下的婚姻会产生什么后果,或是奥地利公爵同法兰西国王之间的友好关系能维持多久,或是英吉利国王会怎样对待他女儿的傲慢无礼,这些都不怎么令他不安。他每晚享受着莎里约王室葡萄园特产的葡萄酒,从未想到路易十一也会诚恳地赠送给爱德华四世几瓶同样的葡萄酒(当然是先被医生夸克纪埃掺进了药汁的),竟会在一个美好的早晨,使路易十一摆脱了爱德华四世的束缚。“最尊敬的奥地利公爵殿下的使臣们”并未使红衣主教怎么操心,但却在别的方面给他添了麻烦。

他,查理·德·波旁,他这位红衣主教,他这个法国人,这个酒友,却要热烈欢迎并盛宴招待那些爱喝啤酒的弗朗德勒人,那些资产阶级,那些执政官员(我们已经在前面交待过),而且还是当着公众的面,这实在是有些令他难堪的。的确,这要算是他讨好国王的事情里面最可厌的一种了。

当守门人用响亮的声音通报:“奥地利公爵殿下的使节们到”,红衣主教就表现出全世界最好的礼貌(对此他是何等的熟悉),朝大门口转过身去。

不用说,整个大厅的人也跟着守门人喊了一遍。

奥地利的马克西米良的四十八位使臣并排着双双到来了,他们都很端庄,和跟随查理·德·波旁的那些教会人士截然不同。为首的是圣倍尔丹的副主教,金羊毛法令的掌管人若望神甫和刚城的高等司法官加克·德·柯瓦·多比阁下。全场观众悄悄忍住笑声,听着他们把那些怪诞的名字和不足道的官衔告诉守门人,守门人又把那些名字和官衔胡乱搅混着转报给观众:卢凡市的执政官何埃洛甫阁下,布鲁塞尔城的执政官克雷·代居尔德阁下,弗朗德勒的首脑彼尔·德巴埃斯大人,安维尔市的市政官若望·戈兰阁下,刚城的首席执政官乔治·德·拉莫埃尔阁下和吉尔多甫·封·代尔·阿克阁下,还有比埃倍格先生,若望·比埃克先生,若望·蒂玛耶日尔先生等等,等等。司法官们,执政官们,市政官们;市政官们,执政官们,司法官们。

全都那么僵硬、古板、迂执,穿着天鹅绒和缎子的节日服装,戴着嵌有大簇西勃尔岛金线的黑天鹅绒帽子。总之,全都是些弗朗德勒的漂亮脑袋,他们庄重而善良的仪表和伦勃朗夜景画里黑色背景上强壮严肃的人物属于同一类型。这些人似乎把一切都写在额头上,正如奥地利的马克西米良在声明书里说的,他有理由“完全相信他们具有审慎、英勇、干练、忠实及其他难得的好品质”。

可是也有一个人是例外。这个人有一副清秀、聪明、机警的面孔,嘴鼻又象猴子又象外交家。红衣主教在这人面前迈了三步,深深地施了一礼,而他的称呼不过是“刚城的参事和养老金领取人居约姆·韩”。

很少人知道这位居约姆·韩是什么人。他是一个罕见的天才,在革命时期一定会干得轰轰烈烈,但是在十五世纪,他却不得不采用空洞的阴谋诡计,就象圣西蒙公爵说的“生活在地道里”。他被认为是欧洲第一个挖地道的人,经常替路易十一出谋划策,插手这位国王的一些机密事务。群众根本不知道这些情况,看见红衣主教对这个其貌不扬的弗朗德勒官员表示的那种礼貌,都觉得非常惊奇。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 din nuIxs     
n.喧闹声,嘈杂声
参考例句:
  • The bustle and din gradually faded to silence as night advanced.随着夜越来越深,喧闹声逐渐沉寂。
  • They tried to make themselves heard over the din of the crowd.他们力图让自己的声音盖过人群的喧闹声。
2 detonation C9zy0     
n.爆炸;巨响
参考例句:
  • A fearful detonation burst forth on the barricade.街垒传来一阵骇人的爆炸声。
  • Within a few hundreds of microseconds,detonation is complete.在几百微秒之内,爆炸便完成了。
3 serpentine MEgzx     
adj.蜿蜒的,弯曲的
参考例句:
  • One part of the Serpentine is kept for swimmers.蜿蜒河的一段划为游泳区。
  • Tremolite laths and serpentine minerals are present in places.有的地方出现透闪石板条及蛇纹石。
4 usher sK2zJ     
n.带位员,招待员;vt.引导,护送;vi.做招待,担任引座员
参考例句:
  • The usher seated us in the front row.引座员让我们在前排就座。
  • They were quickly ushered away.他们被迅速领开。
5 eminence VpLxo     
n.卓越,显赫;高地,高处;名家
参考例句:
  • He is a statesman of great eminence.他是个声名显赫的政治家。
  • Many of the pilots were to achieve eminence in the aeronautical world.这些飞行员中很多人将会在航空界声名显赫。
6 cardinal Xcgy5     
n.(天主教的)红衣主教;adj.首要的,基本的
参考例句:
  • This is a matter of cardinal significance.这是非常重要的事。
  • The Cardinal coloured with vexation. 红衣主教感到恼火,脸涨得通红。
7 disdained d5a61f4ef58e982cb206e243a1d9c102     
鄙视( disdain的过去式和过去分词 ); 不屑于做,不愿意做
参考例句:
  • I disdained to answer his rude remarks. 我不屑回答他的粗话。
  • Jackie disdained the servants that her millions could buy. 杰姬鄙视那些她用钱就可以收买的奴仆。
8 disdain KltzA     
n.鄙视,轻视;v.轻视,鄙视,不屑
参考例句:
  • Some people disdain labour.有些人轻视劳动。
  • A great man should disdain flatterers.伟大的人物应鄙视献媚者。
9 audacity LepyV     
n.大胆,卤莽,无礼
参考例句:
  • He had the audacity to ask for an increase in salary.他竟然厚着脸皮要求增加薪水。
  • He had the audacity to pick pockets in broad daylight.他竟敢在光天化日之下掏包。
10 cardinals 8aa3d7ed97d6793c87fe821585838a4a     
红衣主教( cardinal的名词复数 ); 红衣凤头鸟(见于北美,雄鸟为鲜红色); 基数
参考例句:
  • cardinals in scarlet robes 身披红袍的枢机主教
  • A conclave of cardinals was held to elect the new Pope. 红衣主教团举行了秘密会议来选举新教皇。
11 labyrinth h9Fzr     
n.迷宫;难解的事物;迷路
参考例句:
  • He wandered through the labyrinth of the alleyways.他在迷宫似的小巷中闲逛。
  • The human mind is a labyrinth.人的心灵是一座迷宫。
12 bestowing ec153f37767cf4f7ef2c4afd6905b0fb     
砖窑中砖堆上层已烧透的砖
参考例句:
  • Apollo, you see, is bestowing the razor on the Triptolemus of our craft. 你瞧,阿波罗正在把剃刀赠给我们这项手艺的特里泼托勒默斯。
  • What thanks do we not owe to Heaven for thus bestowing tranquillity, health and competence! 我们要谢谢上苍,赐我们的安乐、健康和饱暖。
13 animated Cz7zMa     
adj.生气勃勃的,活跃的,愉快的
参考例句:
  • His observations gave rise to an animated and lively discussion.他的言论引起了一场气氛热烈而活跃的讨论。
  • We had an animated discussion over current events last evening.昨天晚上我们热烈地讨论时事。
14 naively c42c6bc174e20d494298dbdd419a3b18     
adv. 天真地
参考例句:
  • They naively assume things can only get better. 他们天真地以为情况只会变好。
  • In short, Knox's proposal was ill conceived and naively made. 总而言之,诺克斯的建议考虑不周,显示幼稚。
15 sublime xhVyW     
adj.崇高的,伟大的;极度的,不顾后果的
参考例句:
  • We should take some time to enjoy the sublime beauty of nature.我们应该花些时间去欣赏大自然的壮丽景象。
  • Olympic games play as an important arena to exhibit the sublime idea.奥运会,就是展示此崇高理念的重要舞台。
16 worthy vftwB     
adj.(of)值得的,配得上的;有价值的
参考例句:
  • I did not esteem him to be worthy of trust.我认为他不值得信赖。
  • There occurred nothing that was worthy to be mentioned.没有值得一提的事发生。
17 suite MsMwB     
n.一套(家具);套房;随从人员
参考例句:
  • She has a suite of rooms in the hotel.她在那家旅馆有一套房间。
  • That is a nice suite of furniture.那套家具很不错。
18 hatred T5Gyg     
n.憎恶,憎恨,仇恨
参考例句:
  • He looked at me with hatred in his eyes.他以憎恨的眼光望着我。
  • The old man was seized with burning hatred for the fascists.老人对法西斯主义者充满了仇恨。
19 allusions c86da6c28e67372f86a9828c085dd3ad     
暗指,间接提到( allusion的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • We should not use proverbs and allusions indiscriminately. 不要滥用成语典故。
  • The background lent itself to allusions to European scenes. 眼前的情景容易使人联想到欧洲风光。
20 prologue mRpxq     
n.开场白,序言;开端,序幕
参考例句:
  • A poor wedding is a prologue to misery.不幸的婚姻是痛苦的开始。
  • The prologue to the novel is written in the form of a newspaper account.这本小说的序言是以报纸报道的形式写的。
21 glorification VgwxY     
n.赞颂
参考例句:
  • Militant devotion to and glorification of one's country; fanatical patriotism. 对国家的军事效忠以及美化;狂热的爱国主义。
  • Glorification-A change of place, a new condition with God. 得荣─在神面前新处境,改变了我们的结局。
22 eminent dpRxn     
adj.显赫的,杰出的,有名的,优良的
参考例句:
  • We are expecting the arrival of an eminent scientist.我们正期待一位著名科学家的来访。
  • He is an eminent citizen of China.他是一个杰出的中国公民。
23 entity vo8xl     
n.实体,独立存在体,实际存在物
参考例句:
  • The country is no longer one political entity.这个国家不再是一个统一的政治实体了。
  • As a separate legal entity,the corporation must pay taxes.作为一个独立的法律实体,公司必须纳税。
24 analyzing be408cc8d92ec310bb6260bc127c162b     
v.分析;分析( analyze的现在分词 );分解;解释;对…进行心理分析n.分析
参考例句:
  • Analyzing the date of some socialist countries presents even greater problem s. 分析某些社会主义国家的统计数据,暴露出的问题甚至更大。 来自辞典例句
  • He undoubtedly was not far off the mark in analyzing its predictions. 当然,他对其预测所作的分析倒也八九不离十。 来自辞典例句
25 swollen DrcwL     
adj.肿大的,水涨的;v.使变大,肿胀
参考例句:
  • Her legs had got swollen from standing up all day.因为整天站着,她的双腿已经肿了。
  • A mosquito had bitten her and her arm had swollen up.蚊子叮了她,她的手臂肿起来了。
26 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
27 prodigious C1ZzO     
adj.惊人的,奇妙的;异常的;巨大的;庞大的
参考例句:
  • This business generates cash in prodigious amounts.这种业务收益丰厚。
  • He impressed all who met him with his prodigious memory.他惊人的记忆力让所有见过他的人都印象深刻。
28 stifled 20d6c5b702a525920b7425fe94ea26a5     
(使)窒息, (使)窒闷( stifle的过去式和过去分词 ); 镇压,遏制; 堵
参考例句:
  • The gas stifled them. 煤气使他们窒息。
  • The rebellion was stifled. 叛乱被镇压了。
29 molecule Y6Tzn     
n.分子,克分子
参考例句:
  • A molecule of water is made up of two atoms of hygrogen and one atom of oxygen.一个水分子是由P妈̬f婘̬ 妈̬成的。
  • This gives us the structural formula of the molecule.这种方式给出了分子的结构式。
30 knaves bc7878d3f6a750deb586860916e8cf9b     
n.恶棍,无赖( knave的名词复数 );(纸牌中的)杰克
参考例句:
  • Give knaves an inch and they will take a yard. 我一日三餐都吃得很丰盛。 来自互联网
  • Knaves and robbers can obtain only what was before possessed by others. 流氓、窃贼只能攫取原先由别人占有的财富。 来自互联网
31 petrified 2e51222789ae4ecee6134eb89ed9998d     
adj.惊呆的;目瞪口呆的v.使吓呆,使惊呆;变僵硬;使石化(petrify的过去式和过去分词)
参考例句:
  • I'm petrified of snakes. 我特别怕蛇。
  • The poor child was petrified with fear. 这可怜的孩子被吓呆了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
32 asphyxiated df1132b39a5443cbe960dfadf4b37a90     
v.渴望的,有抱负的,追求名誉或地位的( aspirant的过去式和过去分词 );有志向或渴望获得…的人
参考例句:
  • The men trapped in the mine were asphyxiated by gas. 那些困在矿井中的人因瓦斯中毒窒息死亡。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
  • The men in the coal-mine were asphyxiated by the bad gas. 煤矿坑里的工人们为毒气所窒息。 来自辞典例句
33 tirades ca7b20b5f92c65765962d21cc5a816d4     
激烈的长篇指责或演说( tirade的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • What's the matter with Levin today?Why doesn't he launch into one of his tirades? 你所说得话我全记录下来列文今天怎么啦?没有反唇相讥?
34 lout 83eyW     
n.粗鄙的人;举止粗鲁的人
参考例句:
  • He's just an ill-bred lout.他是个缺乏教养的乡巴佬。
  • He had no training, no skills and he was just a big, bungling,useless lout!什么也不行,什么也不会,自己只是个傻大黑粗的废物!
35 haps 7226286636a9a1dc4226df0e47f52e59     
n.粗厚毛披巾;偶然,机会,运气( hap的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He recorded all the little haps and mishaps of his life. 他记录了下他生命中的所有小祸小福。 来自互联网
  • Per haps he's never run up against any walls. 这家伙大概没有碰过钉子吧? 来自互联网
36 abrupt 2fdyh     
adj.突然的,意外的;唐突的,鲁莽的
参考例句:
  • The river takes an abrupt bend to the west.这河突然向西转弯。
  • His abrupt reply hurt our feelings.他粗鲁的回答伤了我们的感情。
37 fully Gfuzd     
adv.完全地,全部地,彻底地;充分地
参考例句:
  • The doctor asked me to breathe in,then to breathe out fully.医生让我先吸气,然后全部呼出。
  • They soon became fully integrated into the local community.他们很快就完全融入了当地人的圈子。
38 tumult LKrzm     
n.喧哗;激动,混乱;吵闹
参考例句:
  • The tumult in the streets awakened everyone in the house.街上的喧哗吵醒了屋子里的每一个人。
  • His voice disappeared under growing tumult.他的声音消失在越来越响的喧哗声中。
39 exalted ztiz6f     
adj.(地位等)高的,崇高的;尊贵的,高尚的
参考例句:
  • Their loveliness and holiness in accordance with their exalted station.他们的美丽和圣洁也与他们的崇高地位相称。
  • He received respect because he was a person of exalted rank.他因为是个地位崇高的人而受到尊敬。
40 bishop AtNzd     
n.主教,(国际象棋)象
参考例句:
  • He was a bishop who was held in reverence by all.他是一位被大家都尊敬的主教。
  • Two years after his death the bishop was canonised.主教逝世两年后被正式封为圣者。
41 primate A1YzI     
n.灵长类(目)动物,首席主教;adj.首要的
参考例句:
  • 14 percent of primate species are highly endangered.14%的灵长类物种处于高度濒危状态。
  • The woolly spider monkey is the largest primate in the Americas.绒毛蛛猴是美洲最大的灵长类动物。
42 allied iLtys     
adj.协约国的;同盟国的
参考例句:
  • Britain was allied with the United States many times in history.历史上英国曾多次与美国结盟。
  • Allied forces sustained heavy losses in the first few weeks of the campaign.同盟国在最初几周内遭受了巨大的损失。
43 eldest bqkx6     
adj.最年长的,最年老的
参考例句:
  • The King's eldest son is the heir to the throne.国王的长子是王位的继承人。
  • The castle and the land are entailed on the eldest son.城堡和土地限定由长子继承。
44 peculiar cinyo     
adj.古怪的,异常的;特殊的,特有的
参考例句:
  • He walks in a peculiar fashion.他走路的样子很奇特。
  • He looked at me with a very peculiar expression.他用一种很奇怪的表情看着我。
45 distinctive Es5xr     
adj.特别的,有特色的,与众不同的
参考例句:
  • She has a very distinctive way of walking.她走路的样子与别人很不相同。
  • This bird has several distinctive features.这个鸟具有几种突出的特征。
46 embarrassments 5f3d5ecce4738cceef5dce99a8a6434a     
n.尴尬( embarrassment的名词复数 );难堪;局促不安;令人难堪或耻辱的事
参考例句:
  • But there have been many embarrassments along the way. 但是一路走来已经是窘境不断。 来自互联网
  • The embarrassments don't stop there. 让人难受的事情还没完。 来自互联网
47 tack Jq1yb     
n.大头钉;假缝,粗缝
参考例句:
  • He is hammering a tack into the wall to hang a picture.他正往墙上钉一枚平头钉用来挂画。
  • We are going to tack the map on the wall.我们打算把这张地图钉在墙上。
48 shipwreck eypwo     
n.船舶失事,海难
参考例句:
  • He walked away from the shipwreck.他船难中平安地脱险了。
  • The shipwreck was a harrowing experience.那次船难是一个惨痛的经历。
49 devoured af343afccf250213c6b0cadbf3a346a9     
吞没( devour的过去式和过去分词 ); 耗尽; 津津有味地看; 狼吞虎咽地吃光
参考例句:
  • She devoured everything she could lay her hands on: books, magazines and newspapers. 无论是书、杂志,还是报纸,只要能弄得到,她都看得津津有味。
  • The lions devoured a zebra in a short time. 狮子一会儿就吃掉了一匹斑马。
50 constable wppzG     
n.(英国)警察,警官
参考例句:
  • The constable conducted the suspect to the police station.警官把嫌疑犯带到派出所。
  • The constable kept his temper,and would not be provoked.那警察压制着自己的怒气,不肯冒起火来。
51 hindrance AdKz2     
n.妨碍,障碍
参考例句:
  • Now they can construct tunnel systems without hindrance.现在他们可以顺利地建造隧道系统了。
  • The heavy baggage was a great hindrance to me.那件行李成了我的大累赘。
52 precisely zlWzUb     
adv.恰好,正好,精确地,细致地
参考例句:
  • It's precisely that sort of slick sales-talk that I mistrust.我不相信的正是那种油腔滑调的推销宣传。
  • The man adjusted very precisely.那个人调得很准。
53 disquiet rtbxJ     
n.担心,焦虑
参考例句:
  • The disquiet will boil over in the long run.这种不安情绪终有一天会爆发的。
  • Her disquiet made us uneasy too.她的忧虑使我们也很不安。
54 varied giIw9     
adj.多样的,多变化的
参考例句:
  • The forms of art are many and varied.艺术的形式是多种多样的。
  • The hotel has a varied programme of nightly entertainment.宾馆有各种晚间娱乐活动。
55 laborious VxoyD     
adj.吃力的,努力的,不流畅
参考例句:
  • They had the laborious task of cutting down the huge tree.他们接受了伐大树的艰苦工作。
  • Ants and bees are laborious insects.蚂蚁与蜜蜂是勤劳的昆虫。
56 thereby Sokwv     
adv.因此,从而
参考例句:
  • I have never been to that city,,ereby I don't know much about it.我从未去过那座城市,因此对它不怎么熟悉。
  • He became a British citizen,thereby gaining the right to vote.他成了英国公民,因而得到了投票权。
57 joyous d3sxB     
adj.充满快乐的;令人高兴的
参考例句:
  • The lively dance heightened the joyous atmosphere of the scene.轻快的舞蹈给这场戏渲染了欢乐气氛。
  • They conveyed the joyous news to us soon.他们把这一佳音很快地传递给我们。
58 bestowed 12e1d67c73811aa19bdfe3ae4a8c2c28     
赠给,授予( bestow的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • It was a title bestowed upon him by the king. 那是国王赐给他的头衔。
  • He considered himself unworthy of the honour they had bestowed on him. 他认为自己不配得到大家赋予他的荣誉。
59 bishops 391617e5d7bcaaf54a7c2ad3fc490348     
(基督教某些教派管辖大教区的)主教( bishop的名词复数 ); (国际象棋的)象
参考例句:
  • Each player has two bishops at the start of the game. 棋赛开始时,每名棋手有两只象。
  • "Only sheriffs and bishops and rich people and kings, and such like. “他劫富济贫,抢的都是郡长、主教、国王之类的富人。
60 gallant 66Myb     
adj.英勇的,豪侠的;(向女人)献殷勤的
参考例句:
  • Huang Jiguang's gallant deed is known by all men. 黄继光的英勇事迹尽人皆知。
  • These gallant soldiers will protect our country.这些勇敢的士兵会保卫我们的国家的。
61 jovial TabzG     
adj.快乐的,好交际的
参考例句:
  • He seemed jovial,but his eyes avoided ours.他显得很高兴,但他的眼光却避开了我们的眼光。
  • Grandma was plump and jovial.祖母身材圆胖,整天乐呵呵的。
62 carousing b010797b2c65f4c563ad2ffac1045fdd     
v.痛饮,闹饮欢宴( carouse的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • During the next nine years he alternated between service in several armies and carousing in Paris. 在那以后的九年里,他时而在几个军队中服役,时而在巴黎狂欢作乐。 来自辞典例句
  • In his youth George W. Bush had a reputation for carousing. 小布什在年轻时有好玩的名声。 来自互联网
63 devout Qlozt     
adj.虔诚的,虔敬的,衷心的 (n.devoutness)
参考例句:
  • His devout Catholicism appeals to ordinary people.他对天主教的虔诚信仰感染了普通民众。
  • The devout man prayed daily.那位虔诚的男士每天都祈祷。
64 illuminated 98b351e9bc282af85e83e767e5ec76b8     
adj.被照明的;受启迪的
参考例句:
  • Floodlights illuminated the stadium. 泛光灯照亮了体育场。
  • the illuminated city at night 夜幕中万家灯火的城市
65 displeased 1uFz5L     
a.不快的
参考例句:
  • The old man was displeased and darted an angry look at me. 老人不高兴了,瞪了我一眼。
  • He was displeased about the whole affair. 他对整个事情感到很不高兴。
66 rancor hA6zj     
n.深仇,积怨
参考例句:
  • I have no rancor against him.我对他无怨无仇。
  • Their rancor dated from a political dogfight between them.他们的积怨来自于他们之间在政治上的狗咬狗。
67 bourgeois ERoyR     
adj./n.追求物质享受的(人);中产阶级分子
参考例句:
  • He's accusing them of having a bourgeois and limited vision.他指责他们像中产阶级一样目光狭隘。
  • The French Revolution was inspired by the bourgeois.法国革命受到中产阶级的鼓励。
68 scarlet zD8zv     
n.深红色,绯红色,红衣;adj.绯红色的
参考例句:
  • The scarlet leaves of the maples contrast well with the dark green of the pines.深红的枫叶和暗绿的松树形成了明显的对比。
  • The glowing clouds are growing slowly pale,scarlet,bright red,and then light red.天空的霞光渐渐地淡下去了,深红的颜色变成了绯红,绯红又变为浅红。
69 injustice O45yL     
n.非正义,不公正,不公平,侵犯(别人的)权利
参考例句:
  • They complained of injustice in the way they had been treated.他们抱怨受到不公平的对待。
  • All his life he has been struggling against injustice.他一生都在与不公正现象作斗争。
70 hoot HdzzK     
n.鸟叫声,汽车的喇叭声; v.使汽车鸣喇叭
参考例句:
  • The sudden hoot of a whistle broke into my thoughts.突然响起的汽笛声打断了我的思路。
  • In a string of shrill hoot of the horn sound,he quickly ran to her.在一串尖声鸣叫的喇叭声中,他快速地跑向她。
71 hereditary fQJzF     
adj.遗传的,遗传性的,可继承的,世袭的
参考例句:
  • The Queen of England is a hereditary ruler.英国女王是世袭的统治者。
  • In men,hair loss is hereditary.男性脱发属于遗传。
72 velvet 5gqyO     
n.丝绒,天鹅绒;adj.丝绒制的,柔软的
参考例句:
  • This material feels like velvet.这料子摸起来像丝绒。
  • The new settlers wore the finest silk and velvet clothing.新来的移民穿着最华丽的丝绸和天鹅绒衣服。
73 libertine 21hxL     
n.淫荡者;adj.放荡的,自由思想的
参考例句:
  • The transition from libertine to prig was so complete.一个酒徒色鬼竟然摇身一变就成了道学先生。
  • I believe John is not a libertine any more.我相信约翰不再是个浪子了。
74 absurdities df766e7f956019fcf6a19cc2525cadfb     
n.极端无理性( absurdity的名词复数 );荒谬;谬论;荒谬的行为
参考例句:
  • She has a sharp eye for social absurdities, and compassion for the victims of social change. 她独具慧眼,能够看到社会上荒唐的事情,对于社会变革的受害者寄以同情。 来自辞典例句
  • The absurdities he uttered at the dinner party landed his wife in an awkward situation. 他在宴会上讲的荒唐话使他太太陷入窘境。 来自辞典例句
75 turpitude Slwwy     
n.可耻;邪恶
参考例句:
  • He was considered unfit to hold office because of moral turpitude.因为道德上的可耻行为,他被认为不适担任公务员。
  • Let every declamation turn upon the beauty of liberty and virtue,and the deformity,turpitude,and malignity of slavery and vice.让每一篇演讲都来谈自由和道德之美,都来谈奴役和邪恶之丑陋、卑鄙和恶毒。
76 revile hB3zW     
v.辱骂,谩骂
参考例句:
  • No man should reproach,revile,or slander another man.人们不应羞辱,辱骂或诽谤他人。|||Some Muslim communities in East Africa revile dogs because they believe that canines ate the body of the Prophet Muhammad.一些东非的穆斯林团体会辱骂狗,因为他们相信是它们吃了先知穆罕默德的尸体。
77 abstain SVUzq     
v.自制,戒绝,弃权,避免
参考例句:
  • His doctor ordered him to abstain from beer and wine.他的医生嘱咐他戒酒。
  • Three Conservative MPs abstained in the vote.三位保守党下院议员投了弃权票。
78 uproar LHfyc     
n.骚动,喧嚣,鼎沸
参考例句:
  • She could hear the uproar in the room.她能听见房间里的吵闹声。
  • His remarks threw the audience into an uproar.他的讲话使听众沸腾起来。
79 frightful Ghmxw     
adj.可怕的;讨厌的
参考例句:
  • How frightful to have a husband who snores!有一个发鼾声的丈夫多讨厌啊!
  • We're having frightful weather these days.这几天天气坏极了。
80 blasphemies 03153f820424ca21b037633d3d1b7481     
n.对上帝的亵渎,亵渎的言词[行为]( blasphemy的名词复数 );侮慢的言词(或行为)
参考例句:
  • That foul mouth stands there bringing more ill fortune with his blasphemies. 那一张臭嘴站在那儿满嘴喷粪,只能带来更多恶运。 来自辞典例句
  • All great truths begin as blasphemies. 一切伟大的真理起初都被视为大逆不道的邪说。 来自辞典例句
81 defiance RmSzx     
n.挑战,挑衅,蔑视,违抗
参考例句:
  • He climbed the ladder in defiance of the warning.他无视警告爬上了那架梯子。
  • He slammed the door in a spirit of defiance.他以挑衅性的态度把门砰地一下关上。
82 deafening deafening     
adj. 振耳欲聋的, 极喧闹的 动词deafen的现在分词形式
参考例句:
  • The noise of the siren was deafening her. 汽笛声震得她耳朵都快聋了。
  • The noise of the machine was deafening. 机器的轰鸣声震耳欲聋。
83 impudent X4Eyf     
adj.鲁莽的,卑鄙的,厚颜无耻的
参考例句:
  • She's tolerant toward those impudent colleagues.她对那些无礼的同事采取容忍的态度。
  • The teacher threatened to kick the impudent pupil out of the room.老师威胁着要把这无礼的小学生撵出教室。
84 solicitude mFEza     
n.焦虑
参考例句:
  • Your solicitude was a great consolation to me.你对我的关怀给了我莫大的安慰。
  • He is full of tender solicitude towards my sister.他对我妹妹满心牵挂。
85 mien oDOxl     
n.风采;态度
参考例句:
  • He was a Vietnam veteran with a haunted mien.他是个越战老兵,举止总有些惶然。
  • It was impossible to tell from his mien whether he was offended.从他的神态中难以看出他是否生气了。
86 preoccupied TPBxZ     
adj.全神贯注的,入神的;被抢先占有的;心事重重的v.占据(某人)思想,使对…全神贯注,使专心于( preoccupy的过去式)
参考例句:
  • He was too preoccupied with his own thoughts to notice anything wrong. 他只顾想着心事,没注意到有什么不对。
  • The question of going to the Mount Tai preoccupied his mind. 去游泰山的问题盘踞在他心头。 来自《简明英汉词典》
87 flasks 34ad8a54a8490ad2e98fb04e57c2fc0d     
n.瓶,长颈瓶, 烧瓶( flask的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • The juggler juggled three flasks. 这个玩杂耍的人可同时抛接三个瓶子。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The meat in all of the open flasks putrefied. 所有开口瓶中的肉都腐烂了。 来自辞典例句
88 grimaces 40efde7bdc7747d57d6bf2f938e10b72     
n.(表蔑视、厌恶等)面部扭曲,鬼脸( grimace的名词复数 )v.扮鬼相,做鬼脸( grimace的第三人称单数 )
参考例句:
  • Mr. Clark winked at the rude child making grimaces. 克拉克先生假装没有看见那个野孩子做鬼脸。 来自辞典例句
  • The most ridiculous grimaces were purposely or unconsciously indulged in. 故意或者无心地扮出最滑稽可笑的鬼脸。 来自辞典例句
89 sonorous qFMyv     
adj.响亮的,回响的;adv.圆润低沉地;感人地;n.感人,堂皇
参考例句:
  • The sonorous voice of the speaker echoed round the room.那位演讲人洪亮的声音在室内回荡。
  • He has a deep sonorous voice.他的声音深沉而洪亮。
90 envoys fe850873669d975a9344f0cba10070d2     
使节( envoy的名词复数 ); 公使; 谈判代表; 使节身份
参考例句:
  • the routine tit for tat when countries expel each other's envoys 国家相互驱逐对方使节这种惯常的报复行动
  • Marco Polo's travelogue mentions that Kublai Khan sent envoys to Malgache. 马可波罗游记中提到忽必烈曾派使节到马尔加什。
91 frisky LfNzk     
adj.活泼的,欢闹的;n.活泼,闹着玩;adv.活泼地,闹着玩地
参考例句:
  • I felt frisky,as if I might break into a dance.我感到很欢快,似乎要跳起舞来。
  • His horse was feeling frisky,and he had to hold the reins tightly.马儿欢蹦乱跳,他不得不紧勒缰绳。
92 chancellor aUAyA     
n.(英)大臣;法官;(德、奥)总理;大学校长
参考例句:
  • They submitted their reports to the Chancellor yesterday.他们昨天向财政大臣递交了报告。
  • He was regarded as the most successful Chancellor of modern times.他被认为是现代最成功的财政大臣。
93 preposterous e1Tz2     
adj.荒谬的,可笑的
参考例句:
  • The whole idea was preposterous.整个想法都荒唐透顶。
  • It would be preposterous to shovel coal with a teaspoon.用茶匙铲煤是荒谬的。
94 imperturbable dcQzG     
adj.镇静的
参考例句:
  • Thomas,of course,was cool and aloof and imperturbable.当然,托马斯沉着、冷漠,不易激动。
  • Edward was a model of good temper and his equanimity imperturbable.爱德华是个典型的好性子,他总是沉着镇定。
95 affectedly b0b372cd6c69ee567b4c879f652354ea     
参考例句:
  • Two people affectedly bashful half talent says: "Without. " 两人扭捏了半天才说:“没有。” 来自互联网
  • The officials don't accept people's petition, if they do, they just affectedly. 这些官员不会接受人民的请愿,如果他们会接受,那也只是在做作而已。 来自互联网
96 hooded hooded     
adj.戴头巾的;有罩盖的;颈部因肋骨运动而膨胀的
参考例句:
  • A hooded figure waited in the doorway. 一个戴兜帽的人在门口等候。
  • Black-eyed gipsy girls, hooded in showy handkerchiefs, sallied forth to tell fortunes. 黑眼睛的吉卜赛姑娘,用华丽的手巾包着头,突然地闯了进来替人算命。 来自辞典例句
97 valor Titwk     
n.勇气,英勇
参考例句:
  • Fortitude is distinct from valor.坚韧不拔有别于勇猛。
  • Frequently banality is the better parts of valor.老生常谈往往比大胆打破常规更为人称道。
98 loyalty gA9xu     
n.忠诚,忠心
参考例句:
  • She told him the truth from a sense of loyalty.她告诉他真相是出于忠诚。
  • His loyalty to his friends was never in doubt.他对朋友的一片忠心从来没受到怀疑。
99 diplomat Pu0xk     
n.外交官,外交家;能交际的人,圆滑的人
参考例句:
  • The diplomat threw in a joke, and the tension was instantly relieved.那位外交官插进一个笑话,紧张的气氛顿时缓和下来。
  • He served as a diplomat in Russia before the war.战前他在俄罗斯当外交官。
100 pensioner ClOzzW     
n.领养老金的人
参考例句:
  • The tax threshold for a single pensioner is$ 445.单身领退休年金者的纳税起点为445英镑。
  • It was the pensioner's vote late in the day that influenced the election of Mr.Sweet.最后是领取养老金者的选票影响了斯威特先生的当选。
101 intrigues 48ab0f2aaba243694d1c9733fa06cfd7     
n.密谋策划( intrigue的名词复数 );神秘气氛;引人入胜的复杂情节v.搞阴谋诡计( intrigue的第三人称单数 );激起…的好奇心
参考例句:
  • He was made king as a result of various intrigues. 由于搞了各种各样的阴谋,他当上了国王。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Those who go in for intrigues and conspiracy are doomed to failure. 搞阴谋诡计的人注定要失败。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
102 throng sGTy4     
n.人群,群众;v.拥挤,群集
参考例句:
  • A patient throng was waiting in silence.一大群耐心的人在静静地等着。
  • The crowds thronged into the mall.人群涌进大厅。
103 frail yz3yD     
adj.身体虚弱的;易损坏的
参考例句:
  • Mrs. Warner is already 96 and too frail to live by herself.华纳太太已经九十六岁了,身体虚弱,不便独居。
  • She lay in bed looking particularly frail.她躺在床上,看上去特别虚弱。


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