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Chapter 5
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The next evening old Mr. Sillerton Jackson came to dine with the Archers1.

Mrs. Archer2 was a shy woman and shrank from society; but she liked to be well-informed as to its doings. Her old friend Mr. Sillerton Jackson applied3 to the investigation4 of his friends' affairs the patience of a collector and the science of a naturalist5; and his sister, Miss Sophy Jackson, who lived with him, and was entertained by all the people who could not secure her much-sought-after brother, brought home bits of minor6 gossip that filled out usefully the gaps in his picture.

Therefore, whenever anything happened that Mrs. Archer wanted to know about, she asked Mr. Jackson to dine; and as she honoured few people with her invitations, and as she and her daughter Janey were an excellent audience, Mr. Jackson usually came himself instead of sending his sister. If he could have dictated9 all the conditions, he would have chosen the evenings when Newland was out; not because the young man was uncongenial to him (the two got on capitally at their club) but because the old anecdotist sometimes felt, on Newland's part, a tendency to weigh his evidence that the ladies of the family never showed.

Mr. Jackson, if perfection had been attainable10 on earth, would also have asked that Mrs. Archer's food should be a little better. But then New York, as far back as the mind of man could travel, had been divided into the two great fundamental groups of the Mingotts and Mansons and all their clan11, who cared about eating and clothes and money, and the Archer-Newland- van-der-Luyden tribe, who were devoted12 to travel, horticulture and the best fiction, and looked down on the grosser forms of pleasure.

You couldn't have everything, after all. If you dined with the Lovell Mingotts you got canvas-back and terrapin13 and vintage wines; at Adeline Archer's you could talk about Alpine14 scenery and "The Marble Faun"; and luckily the Archer Madeira had gone round the Cape15. Therefore when a friendly summons came from Mrs. Archer, Mr. Jackson, who was a true eclectic, would usually say to his sister: "I've been a little gouty since my last dinner at the Lovell Mingotts'--it will do me good to diet at Adeline's."

Mrs. Archer, who had long been a widow, lived with her son and daughter in West Twenty-eighth Street. An upper floor was dedicated16 to Newland, and the two women squeezed themselves into narrower quarters below. In an unclouded harmony of tastes and interests they cultivated ferns in Wardian cases, made macrame lace and wool embroidery17 on linen18, collected American revolutionary glazed19 ware20, subscribed21 to "Good Words," and read Ouida's novels for the sake of the Italian atmosphere. (They preferred those about peasant life, because of the descriptions of scenery and the pleasanter sentiments, though in general they liked novels about people in society, whose motives22 and habits were more comprehensible, spoke23 severely24 of Dickens, who "had never drawn25 a gentleman," and considered Thackeray less at home in the great world than Bulwer--who, however, was beginning to be thought old-fashioned.) Mrs. and Miss Archer were both great lovers of scenery. It was what they principally sought and admired on their occasional travels abroad; considering architecture and painting as subjects for men, and chiefly for learned persons who read Ruskin. Mrs. Archer had been born a Newland, and mother and daughter, who were as like as sisters, were both, as people said, "true Newlands"; tall, pale, and slightly round-shouldered, with long noses, sweet smiles and a kind of drooping26 distinction like that in certain faded Reynolds portraits. Their physical resemblance would have been complete if an elderly embonpoint had not stretched Mrs. Archer's black brocade, while Miss Archer's brown and purple poplins hung, as the years went on, more and more slackly on her virgin27 frame.

Mentally, the likeness28 between them, as Newland was aware, was less complete than their identical mannerisms often made it appear. The long habit of living together in mutually dependent intimacy29 had given them the same vocabulary, and the same habit of beginning their phrases "Mother thinks" or "Janey thinks," according as one or the other wished to advance an opinion of her own; but in reality, while Mrs. Archer's serene30 unimaginativeness rested easily in the accepted and familiar, Janey was subject to starts and aberrations31 of fancy welling up from springs of suppressed romance.

Mother and daughter adored each other and revered32 their son and brother; and Archer loved them with a tenderness made compunctious and uncritical by the sense of their exaggerated admiration33, and by his secret satisfaction in it. After all, he thought it a good thing for a man to have his authority respected in his own house, even if his sense of humour sometimes made him question the force of his mandate34.

On this occasion the young man was very sure that Mr. Jackson would rather have had him dine out; but he had his own reasons for not doing so.

Of course old Jackson wanted to talk about Ellen Olenska, and of course Mrs. Archer and Janey wanted to hear what he had to tell. All three would be slightly embarrassed by Newland's presence, now that his prospective35 relation to the Mingott clan had been made known; and the young man waited with an amused curiosity to see how they would turn the difficulty.

They began, obliquely36, by talking about Mrs. Lemuel Struthers.

"It's a pity the Beauforts asked her," Mrs. Archer said gently. "But then Regina always does what he tells her; and BEAUFORT--"

"Certain nuances escape Beaufort," said Mr. Jackson, cautiously inspecting the broiled37 shad, and wondering for the thousandth time why Mrs. Archer's cook always burnt the roe38 to a cinder39. (Newland, who had long shared his wonder, could always detect it in the older man's expression of melancholy40 disapproval41.)

"Oh, necessarily; Beaufort is a vulgar man," said Mrs. Archer. "My grandfather Newland always used to say to my mother: `Whatever you do, don't let that fellow Beaufort be introduced to the girls.' But at least he's had the advantage of associating with gentlemen; in England too, they say. It's all very mysterious--" She glanced at Janey and paused. She and Janey knew every fold of the Beaufort mystery, but in public Mrs. Archer continued to assume that the subject was not one for the unmarried.

"But this Mrs. Struthers," Mrs. Archer continued; "what did you say SHE was, Sillerton?"

"Out of a mine: or rather out of the saloon at the head of the pit. Then with Living Wax-Works, touring New England. After the police broke THAT up, they say she lived--" Mr. Jackson in his turn glanced at Janey, whose eyes began to bulge42 from under her prominent lids. There were still hiatuses for her in Mrs. Struthers's past.

"Then," Mr. Jackson continued (and Archer saw he was wondering why no one had told the butler never to slice cucumbers with a steel knife), "then Lemuel Struthers came along. They say his advertiser used the girl's head for the shoe-polish posters; her hair's intensely black, you know--the Egyptian style. Anyhow, he-- eventually--married her." There were volumes of innuendo43 in the way the "eventually" was spaced, and each syllable44 given its due stress.

"Oh, well--at the pass we've come to nowadays, it doesn't matter," said Mrs. Archer indifferently. The ladies were not really interested in Mrs. Struthers just then; the subject of Ellen Olenska was too fresh and too absorbing to them. Indeed, Mrs. Struthers's name had been introduced by Mrs. Archer only that she might presently be able to say: "And Newland's new cousin--Countess Olenska? Was SHE at the ball too?"

There was a faint touch of sarcasm45 in the reference to her son, and Archer knew it and had expected it. Even Mrs. Archer, who was seldom unduly46 pleased with human events, had been altogether glad of her son's engagement. ("Especially after that silly business with Mrs. Rushworth," as she had remarked to Janey, alluding47 to what had once seemed to Newland a tragedy of which his soul would always bear the scar.)

There was no better match in New York than May Welland, look at the question from whatever point you chose. Of course such a marriage was only what Newland was entitled to; but young men are so foolish and incalculable--and some women so ensnaring and unscrupulous--that it was nothing short of a miracle to see one's only son safe past the Siren Isle48 and in the haven49 of a blameless domesticity.

All this Mrs. Archer felt, and her son knew she felt; but he knew also that she had been perturbed50 by the premature51 announcement of his engagement, or rather by its cause; and it was for that reason--because on the whole he was a tender and indulgent master--that he had stayed at home that evening. "It's not that I don't approve of the Mingotts' esprit de corps52; but why Newland's engagement should be mixed up with that Olenska woman's comings and goings I don't see," Mrs. Archer grumbled53 to Janey, the only witness of her slight lapses54 from perfect sweetness.

She had behaved beautifully--and in beautiful behaviour she was unsurpassed--during the call on Mrs. Welland; but Newland knew (and his betrothed55 doubtless guessed) that all through the visit she and Janey were nervously56 on the watch for Madame Olenska's possible intrusion; and when they left the house together she had permitted herself to say to her son: "I'm thankful that Augusta Welland received us alone."

These indications of inward disturbance57 moved Archer the more that he too felt that the Mingotts had gone a little too far. But, as it was against all the rules of their code that the mother and son should ever allude58 to what was uppermost in their thoughts, he simply replied: "Oh, well, there's always a phase of family parties to be gone through when one gets engaged, and the sooner it's over the better." At which his mother merely pursed her lips under the lace veil that hung down from her grey velvet59 bonnet60 trimmed with frosted grapes.

Her revenge, he felt--her lawful61 revenge--would be to "draw" Mr. Jackson that evening on the Countess Olenska; and, having publicly done his duty as a future member of the Mingott clan, the young man had no objection to hearing the lady discussed in private--except that the subject was already beginning to bore him.

Mr. Jackson had helped himself to a slice of the tepid62 filet63 which the mournful butler had handed him with a look as sceptical as his own, and had rejected the mushroom sauce after a scarcely perceptible sniff64. He looked baffled and hungry, and Archer reflected that he would probably finish his meal on Ellen Olenska.

Mr. Jackson leaned back in his chair, and glanced up at the candlelit Archers, Newlands and van der Luydens hanging in dark frames on the dark walls.

"Ah, how your grandfather Archer loved a good dinner, my dear Newland!" he said, his eyes on the portrait of a plump full-chested young man in a stock and a blue coat, with a view of a white-columned country-house behind him. "Well--well--well . . . I wonder what he would have said to all these foreign marriages!"

Mrs. Archer ignored the allusion65 to the ancestral cuisine66 and Mr. Jackson continued with deliberation: "No, she was NOT at the ball."

"Ah--" Mrs. Archer murmured, in a tone that implied: "She had that decency67."

"Perhaps the Beauforts don't know her," Janey suggested, with her artless malice68.

Mr. Jackson gave a faint sip7, as if he had been tasting invisible Madeira. "Mrs. Beaufort may not--but Beaufort certainly does, for she was seen walking up Fifth Avenue this afternoon with him by the whole of New York."

"Mercy--" moaned Mrs. Archer, evidently perceiving the uselessness of trying to ascribe the actions of foreigners to a sense of delicacy69.

"I wonder if she wears a round hat or a bonnet in the afternoon," Janey speculated. "At the Opera I know she had on dark blue velvet, perfectly70 plain and flat-- like a night-gown."

"Janey!" said her mother; and Miss Archer blushed and tried to look audacious.

"It was, at any rate, in better taste not to go to the ball," Mrs. Archer continued.

A spirit of perversity71 moved her son to rejoin: "I don't think it was a question of taste with her. May said she meant to go, and then decided72 that the dress in question wasn't smart enough."

Mrs. Archer smiled at this confirmation73 of her inference. "Poor Ellen," she simply remarked; adding compassionately74: "We must always bear in mind what an eccentric bringing-up Medora Manson gave her. What can you expect of a girl who was allowed to wear black satin at her coming-out ball?"

"Ah--don't I remember her in it!" said Mr. Jackson; adding: "Poor girl!" in the tone of one who, while enjoying the memory, had fully8 understood at the time what the sight portended75.

"It's odd," Janey remarked, "that she should have kept such an ugly name as Ellen. I should have changed it to Elaine." She glanced about the table to see the effect of this.

Her brother laughed. "Why Elaine?"

"I don't know; it sounds more--more Polish," said Janey, blushing.

"It sounds more conspicuous76; and that can hardly be what she wishes," said Mrs. Archer distantly.

"Why not?" broke in her son, growing suddenly argumentative. "Why shouldn't she be conspicuous if she chooses? Why should she slink about as if it were she who had disgraced herself? She's `poor Ellen' certainly, because she had the bad luck to make a wretched marriage; but I don't see that that's a reason for hiding her head as if she were the culprit."

"That, I suppose," said Mr. Jackson, speculatively77, "is the line the Mingotts mean to take."

The young man reddened. "I didn't have to wait for their cue, if that's what you mean, sir. Madame Olenska has had an unhappy life: that doesn't make her an outcast."

"There are rumours," began Mr. Jackson, glancing at Janey.

"Oh, I know: the secretary," the young man took him up. "Nonsense, mother; Janey's grown-up. They say, don't they," he went on, "that the secretary helped her to get away from her brute78 of a husband, who kept her practically a prisoner? Well, what if he did? I hope there isn't a man among us who wouldn't have done the same in such a case."

Mr. Jackson glanced over his shoulder to say to the sad butler: "Perhaps . . . that sauce . . . just a little, after all--"; then, having helped himself, he remarked: "I'm told she's looking for a house. She means to live here."

"I hear she means to get a divorce," said Janey boldly.

"I hope she will!" Archer exclaimed.

The word had fallen like a bombshell in the pure and tranquil79 atmosphere of the Archer dining-room. Mrs. Archer raised her delicate eye-brows in the particular curve that signified: "The butler--" and the young man, himself mindful of the bad taste of discussing such intimate matters in public, hastily branched off into an account of his visit to old Mrs. Mingott.

After dinner, according to immemorial custom, Mrs. Archer and Janey trailed their long silk draperies up to the drawing-room, where, while the gentlemen smoked below stairs, they sat beside a Carcel lamp with an engraved80 globe, facing each other across a rosewood work-table with a green silk bag under it, and stitched at the two ends of a tapestry81 band of field-flowers destined82 to adorn83 an "occasional" chair in the drawing- room of young Mrs. Newland Archer.

While this rite84 was in progress in the drawing-room, Archer settled Mr. Jackson in an armchair near the fire in the Gothic library and handed him a cigar. Mr. Jackson sank into the armchair with satisfaction, lit his cigar with perfect confidence (it was Newland who bought them), and stretching his thin old ankles to the coals, said: "You say the secretary merely helped her to get away, my dear fellow? Well, he was still helping85 her a year later, then; for somebody met 'em living at Lausanne together."

Newland reddened. "Living together? Well, why not? Who had the right to make her life over if she hadn't? I'm sick of the hypocrisy86 that would bury alive a woman of her age if her husband prefers to live with harlots."

He stopped and turned away angrily to light his cigar. "Women ought to be free--as free as we are," he declared, making a discovery of which he was too irritated to measure the terrific consequences.

Mr. Sillerton Jackson stretched his ankles nearer the coals and emitted a sardonic87 whistle.

"Well," he said after a pause, "apparently88 Count Olenski takes your view; for I never heard of his having lifted a finger to get his wife back."

 

第二天晚上,老西勒顿·杰克逊先生前来与阿切尔一家共进晚餐。

阿切尔太太是位腼腆的女人。她畏避社交界,但对其中的种种活动却喜欢了解得一清二楚。她的老朋友西勒顿·杰克逊善于将收藏家的耐心与博物学家的知识应用于对朋友们私事的调查,而与他同住的胞妹索菲·杰克逊,受到那些无法接触她那位广受欢迎的兄长的人们的款待,则把闲言碎语带回家来,有效地充实他的生动描述。

因此,每有阿切尔太太想了解的事情发生,她便请杰克逊先生前来一聚。由于蒙她邀请的人寥若晨星,由于她与她的女儿詹尼都是极出色的听众,杰克逊先生通常都是亲自赴约,而不是派他的妹妹代劳。假如一切都能由他作主,他会选择纽兰不在家的晚上前来,这并非因为年轻人与他情趣不投(他两人在俱乐部相处甚笃),而是由于这位喜谈轶闻的老人有时候感到,纽兰有一种惦量他的证据的倾向,这在女眷们身上却是绝对见不到的。

假如能做到尽善尽美,杰克逊先生还会要求阿切尔太太的饭菜稍加改善。然而那时的纽约上流社会,自人们能记得的时候起就一直分成两大派。一派是明戈特与曼森两姓及其宗族,他们关心吃、穿与金钱;另一派是阿切尔一纽兰一范德卢顿家族,他们倾心于旅游、园艺以及最佳的小说,对粗俗的享乐形式则不屑一顾。

毕竟,一个人不可能好事样样有份。假如你与洛弗尔·明戈特一家共餐,你可以享用灰背野鸭、水龟和陈年佳酿;而在艾德琳·阿切尔家,你却可以高谈阔论阿尔卑斯山的风景和“大理石的半人半羊神像”,而且幸运的是,那位阿切尔·马迪拉曾经游历过好望角。因此,当阿切尔太太发来友好的召唤时,喜欢兼收并蓄的杰克逊先生往往会对妹妹说:“上次在洛弗尔·明戈特家吃饭以后我一直有点痛风——到艾德琳家忌忌口对我会有好处的。”

寡居多年的阿切尔太太与儿子、女儿住在西28街。二楼全部归纽兰专用,两个女人挤在楼下的小房间里。一家人兴趣爱好和谐一致,他们在沃德箱内种蕨类植物,织花边饰带,用亚麻布做毛绣,收藏独立战争时期上釉的器皿,订阅《名言》杂志,并为了追求意大利情调而读韦达的小说。(由于风景描写与情调欢快的缘故,他们更爱读反映农民生活的小说,尽管总体上他们是喜欢描写上流社会人物的作品,因为这些人的动机与习惯容易理解。他们不喜欢狄更斯,因为此人从未刻画过一位绅士。他们还认为,对贵族社会萨克雷不及布尔沃通晓,不过人们已开始觉得后者已经过时。)

阿切尔太太与阿切尔小姐都极爱秀丽的风光,这是她们在偶尔进行的国外旅行中主要的追求与憧憬。她们认为,建筑与绘画是属于男人的课题,而且主要属于那些读过拉斯金著作的有学问的人。阿切尔太太天生是纽兰家的一员,母女俩像姐妹般相像,如人们说的,她们都属于纯正的“纽兰家族”:身材高大,脸色苍白,肩膀略圆,长长的鼻子,甜甜的笑容,还有一种目光低垂的特征,就像雷诺兹某些褪了色的画像里画的那样。不过年迈发福已使阿切尔太太身上的黑色缎服绷得紧而又紧,而阿切尔小姐穿的棕紫色的毛织衣服,却在她那处女的身架上一年比一年宽松。不然的话,她们形体上的相似真可说是维妙维肖了。

就纽兰所知,她们在精神领域的相似却不像她们相同的习性所表现的那样一致。长期的共同生活、相互依存的亲情赋予她们相同的语汇以及开口讲话时相同的习惯。无论哪一位想提出自己的意见时,总是先说“妈妈以为”或“詹尼以为”;但实际上,阿切尔太太却是明显地缺乏想像力,容易满足于公认的事实与熟悉的东西,而詹尼却容易受幻想支配,产生冲动和越轨,那些幻想随时会从压抑的浪漫喷泉中迸发出来。

母女俩相互敬慕,并且都尊重她们的儿子和兄长。而阿切尔也满怀柔情地爱着她们俩,她们对他过分的赞赏使他惴惴不安,他从中得到的内心满足又令他失去鉴别力。他想,一个男人的权威在自己家中受到尊重毕竟是件好事,尽管他的幽默感有时也使他怀疑自己得到的信赖到底有多大威力。

这一次年轻人十分肯定杰克逊先生宁愿让他外出赴宴,然而他有自己的理由不照此办理。

老杰克逊当然是想谈论埃伦·奥兰斯卡的事,阿切尔太太与詹尼当然也想听一听他要讲的内容,三个人都会由于纽兰的在场而略显尴尬:因为他与明戈特家族未来的关系已经公之于众。年轻人饶有兴趣地想看一看,他们将如何解决这一难题。

他们转弯抹角地从勒姆尔·斯特拉瑟斯太太开始谈起。

“遗憾的是博福特夫妇还请了她,”阿切尔太太态度温和地说。“不过话又说回来了,里吉纳总是照他的吩咐办事,而博福特——”

“博福特对细节问题常常是不加留意,”杰克逊先生说,一面仔细审视着盘里的烤河鲱。他第一千次地纳闷,阿切尔太太的厨师为何老是把鱼子给烧成灰渣。(纽兰早就与他持有同样的困惑,且总能够从老人阴沉非难的脸色中看出这一点。)

“嗯,那是自然啰;博福特是个粗人嘛,”阿切尔太太说,“我外公纽兰过去老对我母亲说:‘你干什么都成,可千万别把博福特那个家伙介绍给姑娘们。’可他起码在结交绅士方面已占据了优势;在英国的时候据说也是如此。事情非常神秘——”她瞥了詹尼一眼,收住话头。她与詹尼对博福特的秘密了如指掌,不过在公开场合,阿切尔太太却继续装出这话题不适合未婚女子的样子。

“不过那位斯特拉瑟斯太太,”阿切尔太太接着说,“你说她是干什么的,西勒顿?”

“她来自矿区:或者不如说来自矿井口上一个酒馆。后来跟随‘活蜡像’剧团在新英格兰巡回演出,剧团被警方解散之后,人们说她跟——”这次轮到杰克逊先生朝詹尼瞥了一眼,她的两眼开始从突起的眼睑底下向外膨胀。对她来说,斯特拉瑟斯太太的历史仍有若干空白之处。

“后来,”杰克逊先生接着说(阿切尔发现他正纳闷为什么没有人吩咐仆人决不能用钢刀切黄瓜),“后来勒姆尔·斯特拉瑟斯出现了。人们说,他的广告商用那姑娘的头做鞋油广告画,她的头发漆黑,你知道——是埃及型的。总之他——最后终于——娶了她。”他在给“最后终于”几个字留出的间隔中,隐含着丰富的寓意,每一个音节都作了充分的强调。

“唉,可这——按我们如今面临的尴尬局面来说,也算不了什么,”阿切尔太太冷淡地说、此刻两位女士真正感兴趣的并非斯特拉瑟斯太太,因为埃伦·奥兰斯卡的话题对她们太新鲜、太有魅力了。的确,阿切尔太太之所以提起斯特拉瑟斯太太,只不过为了可以十分便当地说:“还有纽兰那位新表姐——奥兰斯卡伯爵夫人?她也在舞会上吗?”

她提到儿子的时候,话里略带一点讽刺。阿切尔自然听得一清二楚,而且一点也不觉得意外。世间人事很少让她称心如意的阿切尔太太,对儿子的订婚却是一百个高兴。(“特别是在他与拉什沃思太太那桩蠢事之后,”她曾对詹尼这样说。她指的那件事,纽兰曾经视为一场悲剧,将在他灵魂上留下永难磨灭的伤痕。)无论你从何种角度考虑,纽约再也没有比梅·韦兰更好的姑娘了;当然,这样一段姻缘也只有纽兰才能配得上。可年轻男人却都那么傻,那么缺少心计,而有些女人又那样不知羞耻地设置圈套。所以,看到自己惟一的儿子安然无恙地通过莎琳岛,驶进无可挑剔的家庭生活的港湾,这完全是一种奇迹。

这一切阿切尔太太都感觉到了,她儿子也知道她感觉到了。但是,他同时还知道,她被过早宣布他的订婚消息搅得很不安,或者不如说被过早宣布的原因搅得很不安。正是由于这个原因——因为总体上讲他是个极为温情宽容的人——今天晚上他才留在家中。“我并非不赞成明戈特家的集体精神;可为什么要把纽兰的订婚与奥兰斯卡那个女人的事搅在一起,我弄不明白,”阿切尔太太对詹尼抱怨说,后者是她稍欠温柔的惟一见证人。

在对韦兰太太的拜访中,她一直是举止优雅的;而她的优雅举止是无与伦比的。不过纽兰明白(他的未婚妻无疑也猜得出),在整个拜访过程中,她和詹尼都紧张地提防着奥兰斯卡夫人的闯入;当他们一起离开那所住宅时,她不加掩饰地对儿子说:“我很高兴奥古斯塔·韦兰单独接待了我们。”

这些内心不安的暗示更加让阿切尔感动,以致他也觉得明戈特家走得有点太远了。但是,母亲与儿子之间谈论心中刚生的念头,是完全违背他们的道德规范的,所以他只是回答说:“唉,一个人订婚后总要参加一系列的家族聚会,这种活动结束得越快越好。”听了这话,他母亲只是隔着从饰有霜冻葡萄的灰丝绒帽上垂下的网状面纱撇了撇嘴。

他觉得,她的报复——她的合法的报复——就是要在今晚从杰克逊先生口中“引出”奥兰斯卡伯爵夫人的事。年轻人既然已经当众尽了明戈特家族未来成员的义务,他并不反对听一听对那位夫人的私下议论——只不过这话题已经开始让他感到厌烦。

杰克逊先生吃了一片那位脸色阴沉的男仆带着跟他相同的怀疑目光递给他的半冷不热的鱼片。他用让人难以觉察的动作嗅了嗅蘑菇浇头,拒绝了它。他脸色沮丧,样子很饿。阿切尔心想,他很可能要靠谈论埃伦·奥兰斯卡来充饥了。

杰克逊先生在椅子里向后靠了靠,抬眼看了看烛光下挂在昏暗墙壁上深色相框里的阿切尔们、纽兰们,以及范德卢顿们。

“唉,你的祖父阿切尔多么喜爱丰盛的晚餐啊,亲爱的纽兰!”他说,眼睛盯着一位胖胖的胸部饱满的年轻人的画像,那人打着宽领带,穿一件蓝外套,身后是一所带白色圆柱的乡间别墅。“可——可——可不知他会如何看待这些异国婚姻!”

阿切尔太太没有理睬他有关老祖母的菜肴的话,杰克逊先生从容地接下去说:“不,她没到舞会上去。”

“噢——”阿切尔太太低声说,那口气仿佛是说:“她总算还知礼。”

“也许博福特夫妇不认识她,”詹尼带着不加掩饰的敌意推测说。

杰克逊先生轻轻呷了一口,仿佛是在想象中品尝马德拉葡萄酒。“博福特太太可能不认识,但博福特却肯定认识,因为今天下午全纽约的人都看见她和他一起沿第五大街散步。”

“我的天——”阿切尔太太痛苦地呻吟道。她显然明白,想把外国人的这种行径与高雅的概念挂上钩简直是徒劳。

“不知下午她戴的是圆檐帽还是软帽,”詹尼猜测说。“我知道她在着歌剧时穿的是深蓝色天鹅绒,普普通通的,就像睡衣一样。”

“詹尼!”她母亲说;阿切尔小姐脸一红,同时想装出无所顾忌的样子。

“不管怎么说,她没有去舞会,总算是知趣的了,”阿切尔太太接着说。

一种乖僻的情绪,使做儿子的接腔道:“我认为这不是她知趣不知趣的问题。梅说她本来是打算去的,只是后来又觉得你们刚刚说到的那身衣服不够漂亮而已。”

阿切尔太太见儿子用这样的方式证实她的推断,仅仅报之一笑。“可怜的埃伦,”她只这么说了一句,接着又同情地补充道:“我们什么时候都不能忘记,梅多拉·曼森对她进行了什么稀奇古怪的培养教育。在进入社交界的舞会上,居然让她穿黑缎子衣服,你又能指望她会怎样呢?”

“哎呀——她穿的那身衣服我还记得呢!”杰克逊先生说。他接着又补一句:“可怜的姑娘!”那口气既表明他记着那件事,又表明他当时就充分意识到那光景预兆着什么。

“真奇怪,”詹尼说,“她竞一直沿用埃伦这么个难听的名字。假若是我早就改成伊莱恩了。”她环顾一眼餐桌,看这句话产生了什么效果。

她哥哥失声笑了起来。“为什么要叫伊莱恩?”

“不知道,听起来更——更有波兰味,”詹尼涨红了脸说。

“这名字听起来太引人注意,她恐怕不会乐意,”阿切尔太太漠然地说。

“为什么不?”儿子插言道,他突然变得很爱争论。“如果她愿意,为什么就不能引人注意?她为什么就该躲躲闪闪,仿佛自己给自己丢了脸似的?她当然是‘可怜的埃伦’,因为她不幸结下了倒霉的婚姻。但我不认为她因此就得像罪犯一样躲起来。”

“我想,”杰克逊先生沉思地说,“这正是明戈特家的人打算采取的立场。”

年轻人脸红了。“我可没有必要等他们家的暗示——如果你是这个意思的话,先生。奥兰斯卡夫人经历了一段不幸的生活,这不等于她无家可归。”

“外面有些谣传,”杰克逊先生开口说,瞥了詹尼一眼。

“噢,我知道:是说那个秘书,”年轻人打断他的话说。“没关系,母亲,詹尼是大人了。人们不就是说,”他接下去讲,“是那个秘书帮她离开了把她当囚犯看待的那个畜牲丈夫吗?哎,是又怎么样?我相信,我们这些人遇到这种情况,谁都会这么干的。”

杰克逊先生从肩头斜视了一眼那位脸色阴沉的男仆说:“也许……那个佐料……就要一点,总之——”他吃了一口又说:“我听说她在找房子,打算住在这儿。”

“我听说她打算离婚,”詹尼冒失地说。

“我希望她离婚!”阿切尔大声地说。

这话像一块炸弹壳落在了阿切尔家高雅、宁静的餐厅里,阿切尔太太耸起她那优雅的眉毛,那根特殊的曲线表示:“有男仆——”而年轻人自己也意识到公开谈论这类私事有伤风雅,于是急忙把话题岔开,转而去讲他对明戈特老太太的拜访。

晚餐之后,按照自古以来的习惯,阿切尔太太与詹尼拖着长长的绸裙到楼上客厅里去了。当绅士们在楼下吸烟的时候,她们在一台带搂刻灯罩的卡索式灯旁,面对面地在一张黄檀木缝纫桌两边坐下,桌底下挂一个绿色丝绸袋,两人在一块花罩毯两端缝缀起来。那以鲜花铺底的罩毯是预定用来装饰小纽兰·阿切尔太太的客厅里那把“备用”椅子的。

这一仪式在客厅里进行的同时,在那间哥特式的图书室里,阿切尔正让杰克逊先生坐进火炉近处的一把扶手椅,并递给他一支雪茄。杰克逊先生舒舒服服坐在椅子里,信心十足地点着了雪茄(这是纽兰买的)。他把瘦削的脚踝朝煤炉前伸了伸,说:“你说那个秘书仅仅是帮她逃跑吗。亲爱的?可一年之后他仍然在继续帮助她呢。有人在洛桑亲眼看见他们住在一起。”

纽兰脸红了。“住在一起?哎,为什么不可以?假如她自己没有结束她的人生,又有谁有权去结束呢?把她这样年轻的女子活活葬送,而她的丈夫却可以与娼妓在一起鬼混。我痛恨这种伪善的观点。”

他打住话头,气愤地转过身去点着雪茄。“女人应当有自由——跟我们一样的自由,”他断然地说。他仿佛有了一种新的发现,而由于过分激动,还无法估量其可怕的后果。

西勒顿·杰克逊先生把脚踝伸得离炉火更近一些,嘲讽地打了一个唿哨。

“嗯,”他停了一下说,“奥兰斯卡伯爵显然和你持相同的观点;因为我从未听说他动过一根指头去把妻子弄回来。”


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 archers 79516825059e33df150af52884504ced     
n.弓箭手,射箭运动员( archer的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • The next evening old Mr. Sillerton Jackson came to dine with the Archers. 第二天晚上,西勒顿?杰克逊老先生来和阿切尔家人一起吃饭。 来自辞典例句
  • Week of Archer: Double growth for Archers and Marksmen. 射手周:弓箭手与弩手(人类)产量加倍。 来自互联网
2 archer KVxzP     
n.射手,弓箭手
参考例句:
  • The archer strung his bow and aimed an arrow at the target.弓箭手拉紧弓弦将箭瞄准靶子。
  • The archer's shot was a perfect bull's-eye.射手的那一箭正中靶心。
3 applied Tz2zXA     
adj.应用的;v.应用,适用
参考例句:
  • She plans to take a course in applied linguistics.她打算学习应用语言学课程。
  • This cream is best applied to the face at night.这种乳霜最好晚上擦脸用。
4 investigation MRKzq     
n.调查,调查研究
参考例句:
  • In an investigation,a new fact became known, which told against him.在调查中新发现了一件对他不利的事实。
  • He drew the conclusion by building on his own investigation.他根据自己的调查研究作出结论。
5 naturalist QFKxZ     
n.博物学家(尤指直接观察动植物者)
参考例句:
  • He was a printer by trade and naturalist by avocation.他从事印刷业,同时是个博物学爱好者。
  • The naturalist told us many stories about birds.博物学家给我们讲述了许多有关鸟儿的故事。
6 minor e7fzR     
adj.较小(少)的,较次要的;n.辅修学科;vi.辅修
参考例句:
  • The young actor was given a minor part in the new play.年轻的男演员在这出新戏里被分派担任一个小角色。
  • I gave him a minor share of my wealth.我把小部分财产给了他。
7 sip Oxawv     
v.小口地喝,抿,呷;n.一小口的量
参考例句:
  • She took a sip of the cocktail.她啜饮一口鸡尾酒。
  • Elizabeth took a sip of the hot coffee.伊丽莎白呷了一口热咖啡。
8 fully Gfuzd     
adv.完全地,全部地,彻底地;充分地
参考例句:
  • The doctor asked me to breathe in,then to breathe out fully.医生让我先吸气,然后全部呼出。
  • They soon became fully integrated into the local community.他们很快就完全融入了当地人的圈子。
9 dictated aa4dc65f69c81352fa034c36d66908ec     
v.大声讲或读( dictate的过去式和过去分词 );口授;支配;摆布
参考例句:
  • He dictated a letter to his secretary. 他向秘书口授信稿。
  • No person of a strong character likes to be dictated to. 没有一个个性强的人愿受人使唤。 来自《简明英汉词典》
10 attainable ayEzj8     
a.可达到的,可获得的
参考例句:
  • They set the limits of performance attainable. 它们确定着可达到的运行限度。
  • If objectives are to be meaningful to people, they must be clear, attainable, actionable, and verifiable. 如果目标对人们是具有意义的,则目标必须是清晰的,能达到的,可以行动的,以及可供检验的。
11 clan Dq5zi     
n.氏族,部落,宗族,家族,宗派
参考例句:
  • She ranks as my junior in the clan.她的辈分比我小。
  • The Chinese Christians,therefore,practically excommunicate themselves from their own clan.所以,中国的基督徒简直是被逐出了自己的家族了。
12 devoted xu9zka     
adj.忠诚的,忠实的,热心的,献身于...的
参考例句:
  • He devoted his life to the educational cause of the motherland.他为祖国的教育事业贡献了一生。
  • We devoted a lengthy and full discussion to this topic.我们对这个题目进行了长时间的充分讨论。
13 terrapin DpZwE     
n.泥龟;鳖
参考例句:
  • The diamondback terrapin in this undated photo has two heads.这张未标日期的图片上的钻纹龟有两个头。
  • He also owns a two-headed goat,a two-headed terrapin and the world's only living three-headed turtle.他还拥有双头山羊、淡水龟,以及世上现存唯一的三头乌龟。
14 alpine ozCz0j     
adj.高山的;n.高山植物
参考例句:
  • Alpine flowers are abundant there.那里有很多高山地带的花。
  • Its main attractions are alpine lakes and waterfalls .它以高山湖泊和瀑布群为主要特色。
15 cape ITEy6     
n.海角,岬;披肩,短披风
参考例句:
  • I long for a trip to the Cape of Good Hope.我渴望到好望角去旅行。
  • She was wearing a cape over her dress.她在外套上披着一件披肩。
16 dedicated duHzy2     
adj.一心一意的;献身的;热诚的
参考例句:
  • He dedicated his life to the cause of education.他献身于教育事业。
  • His whole energies are dedicated to improve the design.他的全部精力都放在改进这项设计上了。
17 embroidery Wjkz7     
n.绣花,刺绣;绣制品
参考例句:
  • This exquisite embroidery won people's great admiration.这件精美的绣品,使人惊叹不已。
  • This is Jane's first attempt at embroidery.这是简第一次试着绣花。
18 linen W3LyK     
n.亚麻布,亚麻线,亚麻制品;adj.亚麻布制的,亚麻的
参考例句:
  • The worker is starching the linen.这名工人正在给亚麻布上浆。
  • Fine linen and cotton fabrics were known as well as wool.精细的亚麻织品和棉织品像羊毛一样闻名遐迩。
19 glazed 3sLzT8     
adj.光滑的,像玻璃的;上过釉的;呆滞无神的v.装玻璃( glaze的过去式);上釉于,上光;(目光)变得呆滞无神
参考例句:
  • eyes glazed with boredom 厌倦无神的眼睛
  • His eyes glazed over at the sight of her. 看到她时,他的目光就变得呆滞。 来自《简明英汉词典》
20 ware sh9wZ     
n.(常用复数)商品,货物
参考例句:
  • The shop sells a great variety of porcelain ware.这家店铺出售品种繁多的瓷器。
  • Good ware will never want a chapman.好货不须叫卖。
21 subscribed cb9825426eb2cb8cbaf6a72027f5508a     
v.捐助( subscribe的过去式和过去分词 );签署,题词;订阅;同意
参考例句:
  • It is not a theory that is commonly subscribed to. 一般人并不赞成这个理论。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • I subscribed my name to the document. 我在文件上签了字。 来自《简明英汉词典》
22 motives 6c25d038886898b20441190abe240957     
n.动机,目的( motive的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • to impeach sb's motives 怀疑某人的动机
  • His motives are unclear. 他的用意不明。
23 spoke XryyC     
n.(车轮的)辐条;轮辐;破坏某人的计划;阻挠某人的行动 v.讲,谈(speak的过去式);说;演说;从某种观点来说
参考例句:
  • They sourced the spoke nuts from our company.他们的轮辐螺帽是从我们公司获得的。
  • The spokes of a wheel are the bars that connect the outer ring to the centre.辐条是轮子上连接外圈与中心的条棒。
24 severely SiCzmk     
adv.严格地;严厉地;非常恶劣地
参考例句:
  • He was severely criticized and removed from his post.他受到了严厉的批评并且被撤了职。
  • He is severely put down for his careless work.他因工作上的粗心大意而受到了严厉的批评。
25 drawn MuXzIi     
v.拖,拉,拔出;adj.憔悴的,紧张的
参考例句:
  • All the characters in the story are drawn from life.故事中的所有人物都取材于生活。
  • Her gaze was drawn irresistibly to the scene outside.她的目光禁不住被外面的风景所吸引。
26 drooping drooping     
adj. 下垂的,无力的 动词droop的现在分词
参考例句:
  • The drooping willows are waving gently in the morning breeze. 晨风中垂柳袅袅。
  • The branches of the drooping willows were swaying lightly. 垂柳轻飘飘地摆动。
27 virgin phPwj     
n.处女,未婚女子;adj.未经使用的;未经开发的
参考例句:
  • Have you ever been to a virgin forest?你去过原始森林吗?
  • There are vast expanses of virgin land in the remote regions.在边远地区有大片大片未开垦的土地。
28 likeness P1txX     
n.相像,相似(之处)
参考例句:
  • I think the painter has produced a very true likeness.我认为这位画家画得非常逼真。
  • She treasured the painted likeness of her son.她珍藏她儿子的画像。
29 intimacy z4Vxx     
n.熟悉,亲密,密切关系,亲昵的言行
参考例句:
  • His claims to an intimacy with the President are somewhat exaggerated.他声称自己与总统关系密切,这有点言过其实。
  • I wish there were a rule book for intimacy.我希望能有个关于亲密的规则。
30 serene PD2zZ     
adj. 安详的,宁静的,平静的
参考例句:
  • He has entered the serene autumn of his life.他已进入了美好的中年时期。
  • He didn't speak much,he just smiled with that serene smile of his.他话不多,只是脸上露出他招牌式的淡定的微笑。
31 aberrations 3f9f813377f29357eb4a27baa9e0e5d3     
n.偏差( aberration的名词复数 );差错;脱离常规;心理失常
参考例句:
  • These events were aberrations from the norm. 这些事件不合常规。 来自辞典例句
  • These chromosome aberrations are all stable, compatible with cell viability. 这些染色体畸变都是稳定的,不影响细胞生活力的。 来自辞典例句
32 revered 1d4a411490949024694bf40d95a0d35f     
v.崇敬,尊崇,敬畏( revere的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • A number of institutions revered and respected in earlier times have become Aunt Sally for the present generation. 一些早年受到尊崇的惯例,现在已经成了这代人嘲弄的对象了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The Chinese revered corn as a gift from heaven. 中国人将谷物奉为上天的恩赐。 来自辞典例句
33 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
34 mandate sj9yz     
n.托管地;命令,指示
参考例句:
  • The President had a clear mandate to end the war.总统得到明确的授权结束那场战争。
  • The General Election gave him no such mandate.大选并未授予他这种权力。
35 prospective oR7xB     
adj.预期的,未来的,前瞻性的
参考例句:
  • The story should act as a warning to other prospective buyers.这篇报道应该对其他潜在的购买者起到警示作用。
  • They have all these great activities for prospective freshmen.这会举办各种各样的活动来招待未来的新人。
36 obliquely ad073d5d92dfca025ebd4a198e291bdc     
adv.斜; 倾斜; 间接; 不光明正大
参考例句:
  • From the gateway two paths led obliquely across the court. 从门口那儿,有两条小路斜越过院子。 来自辞典例句
  • He was receding obliquely with a curious hurrying gait. 他歪着身子,古怪而急促地迈着步子,往后退去。 来自辞典例句
37 broiled 8xgz4L     
a.烤过的
参考例句:
  • They broiled turkey over a charcoal flame. 他们在木炭上烤火鸡。
  • The desert sun broiled the travelers in the caravan. 沙漠上空灼人的太阳把旅行队成员晒得浑身燥热。
38 roe LCBzp     
n.鱼卵;獐鹿
参考例句:
  • We will serve smoked cod's roe at the dinner.宴会上我们将上一道熏鳕鱼子。
  • I'll scramble some eggs with roe?我用鱼籽炒几个鸡蛋好吗?
39 cinder xqhzt     
n.余烬,矿渣
参考例句:
  • The new technology for the preparation of superfine ferric oxide from pyrite cinder is studied.研究了用硫铁矿烧渣为原料,制取超细氧化铁红的新工艺。
  • The cinder contains useful iron,down from producing sulphuric acid by contact process.接触法制硫酸的矿渣中含有铁矿。
40 melancholy t7rz8     
n.忧郁,愁思;adj.令人感伤(沮丧)的,忧郁的
参考例句:
  • All at once he fell into a state of profound melancholy.他立即陷入无尽的忧思之中。
  • He felt melancholy after he failed the exam.这次考试没通过,他感到很郁闷。
41 disapproval VuTx4     
n.反对,不赞成
参考例句:
  • The teacher made an outward show of disapproval.老师表面上表示不同意。
  • They shouted their disapproval.他们喊叫表示反对。
42 bulge Ns3ze     
n.突出,膨胀,激增;vt.突出,膨胀
参考例句:
  • The apple made a bulge in his pocket.苹果把他口袋塞得鼓了起来。
  • What's that awkward bulge in your pocket?你口袋里那块鼓鼓囊囊的东西是什么?
43 innuendo vbXzE     
n.暗指,讽刺
参考例句:
  • The report was based on rumours,speculation,and innuendo.这份报告建立在谣言、臆断和含沙射影的基础之上。
  • Mark told by innuendo that the opposing team would lose the game.马克暗讽地说敌队会在比赛中输掉。
44 syllable QHezJ     
n.音节;vt.分音节
参考例句:
  • You put too much emphasis on the last syllable.你把最后一个音节读得太重。
  • The stress on the last syllable is light.最后一个音节是轻音节。
45 sarcasm 1CLzI     
n.讥讽,讽刺,嘲弄,反话 (adj.sarcastic)
参考例句:
  • His sarcasm hurt her feelings.他的讽刺伤害了她的感情。
  • She was given to using bitter sarcasm.她惯于用尖酸刻薄语言挖苦人。
46 unduly Mp4ya     
adv.过度地,不适当地
参考例句:
  • He did not sound unduly worried at the prospect.他的口气听上去对前景并不十分担忧。
  • He argued that the law was unduly restrictive.他辩称法律的约束性有些过分了。
47 alluding ac37fbbc50fb32efa49891d205aa5a0a     
提及,暗指( allude的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • He didn't mention your name but I was sure he was alluding to you. 他没提你的名字,但是我确信他是暗指你的。
  • But in fact I was alluding to my physical deficiencies. 可我实在是为自己的容貌寒心。
48 isle fatze     
n.小岛,岛
参考例句:
  • He is from the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea.他来自爱尔兰海的马恩岛。
  • The boat left for the paradise isle of Bali.小船驶向天堂一般的巴厘岛。
49 haven 8dhzp     
n.安全的地方,避难所,庇护所
参考例句:
  • It's a real haven at the end of a busy working day.忙碌了一整天后,这真是一个安乐窝。
  • The school library is a little haven of peace and quiet.学校的图书馆是一个和平且安静的小避风港。
50 perturbed 7lnzsL     
adj.烦燥不安的v.使(某人)烦恼,不安( perturb的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • I am deeply perturbed by the alarming way the situation developing. 我对形势令人忧虑的发展深感不安。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Mother was much perturbed by my illness. 母亲为我的病甚感烦恼不安。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
51 premature FPfxV     
adj.比预期时间早的;不成熟的,仓促的
参考例句:
  • It is yet premature to predict the possible outcome of the dialogue.预言这次对话可能有什么结果为时尚早。
  • The premature baby is doing well.那个早产的婴儿很健康。
52 corps pzzxv     
n.(通信等兵种的)部队;(同类作的)一组
参考例句:
  • The medical corps were cited for bravery in combat.医疗队由于在战场上的英勇表现而受嘉奖。
  • When the war broke out,he volunteered for the Marine Corps.战争爆发时,他自愿参加了海军陆战队。
53 grumbled ed735a7f7af37489d7db1a9ef3b64f91     
抱怨( grumble的过去式和过去分词 ); 发牢骚; 咕哝; 发哼声
参考例句:
  • He grumbled at the low pay offered to him. 他抱怨给他的工资低。
  • The heat was sweltering, and the men grumbled fiercely over their work. 天热得让人发昏,水手们边干活边发着牢骚。
54 lapses 43ecf1ab71734d38301e2287a6e458dc     
n.失误,过失( lapse的名词复数 );小毛病;行为失检;偏离正道v.退步( lapse的第三人称单数 );陷入;倒退;丧失
参考例句:
  • He sometimes lapses from good behavior. 他有时行为失检。 来自辞典例句
  • He could forgive attacks of nerves, panic, bad unexplainable actions, all sorts of lapses. 他可以宽恕突然发作的歇斯底里,惊慌失措,恶劣的莫名其妙的动作,各种各样的失误。 来自辞典例句
55 betrothed betrothed     
n. 已订婚者 动词betroth的过去式和过去分词
参考例句:
  • She is betrothed to John. 她同约翰订了婚。
  • His daughter was betrothed to a teacher. 他的女儿同一个教师订了婚。
56 nervously tn6zFp     
adv.神情激动地,不安地
参考例句:
  • He bit his lip nervously,trying not to cry.他紧张地咬着唇,努力忍着不哭出来。
  • He paced nervously up and down on the platform.他在站台上情绪不安地走来走去。
57 disturbance BsNxk     
n.动乱,骚动;打扰,干扰;(身心)失调
参考例句:
  • He is suffering an emotional disturbance.他的情绪受到了困扰。
  • You can work in here without any disturbance.在这儿你可不受任何干扰地工作。
58 allude vfdyW     
v.提及,暗指
参考例句:
  • Many passages in Scripture allude to this concept.圣经中有许多经文间接地提到这样的概念。
  • She also alluded to her rival's past marital troubles.她还影射了对手过去的婚姻问题。
59 velvet 5gqyO     
n.丝绒,天鹅绒;adj.丝绒制的,柔软的
参考例句:
  • This material feels like velvet.这料子摸起来像丝绒。
  • The new settlers wore the finest silk and velvet clothing.新来的移民穿着最华丽的丝绸和天鹅绒衣服。
60 bonnet AtSzQ     
n.无边女帽;童帽
参考例句:
  • The baby's bonnet keeps the sun out of her eyes.婴孩的帽子遮住阳光,使之不刺眼。
  • She wore a faded black bonnet garnished with faded artificial flowers.她戴着一顶褪了色的黑色无边帽,帽上缀着褪了色的假花。
61 lawful ipKzCt     
adj.法律许可的,守法的,合法的
参考例句:
  • It is not lawful to park in front of a hydrant.在消火栓前停车是不合法的。
  • We don't recognised him to be the lawful heir.我们不承认他为合法继承人。
62 tepid Ggkyl     
adj.微温的,温热的,不太热心的
参考例句:
  • She bent her mouth to the tap and drank the tepid water.她把嘴伸到水龙头底下去喝那微温的水。
  • Her feet firmly planted on the tepid rough brick of the floor.她一双脚稳固地立在微温而粗糙的砖地上。
63 filet C7zyJ     
n.肉片;鱼片
参考例句:
  • They feasted us on filet mignon and strawberry shortcake.他们拿出鱼片和草莓松脆饼盛情款待我们。
  • You cannot make filet mignon out of chopped liver.你不能从品质差的肉制造品质高的肉。
64 sniff PF7zs     
vi.嗅…味道;抽鼻涕;对嗤之以鼻,蔑视
参考例句:
  • The police used dogs to sniff out the criminals in their hiding - place.警察使用警犬查出了罪犯的藏身地点。
  • When Munchie meets a dog on the beach, they sniff each other for a while.当麦奇在海滩上碰到另一条狗的时候,他们会彼此嗅一会儿。
65 allusion CfnyW     
n.暗示,间接提示
参考例句:
  • He made an allusion to a secret plan in his speech.在讲话中他暗示有一项秘密计划。
  • She made no allusion to the incident.她没有提及那个事件。
66 cuisine Yn1yX     
n.烹调,烹饪法
参考例句:
  • This book is the definitive guide to world cuisine.这本书是世界美食的权威指南。
  • This restaurant is renowned for its cuisine.这家餐馆以其精美的饭菜而闻名。
67 decency Jxzxs     
n.体面,得体,合宜,正派,庄重
参考例句:
  • His sense of decency and fair play made him refuse the offer.他的正直感和公平竞争意识使他拒绝了这一提议。
  • Your behaviour is an affront to public decency.你的行为有伤风化。
68 malice P8LzW     
n.恶意,怨恨,蓄意;[律]预谋
参考例句:
  • I detected a suggestion of malice in his remarks.我觉察出他说的话略带恶意。
  • There was a strong current of malice in many of his portraits.他的许多肖像画中都透着一股强烈的怨恨。
69 delicacy mxuxS     
n.精致,细微,微妙,精良;美味,佳肴
参考例句:
  • We admired the delicacy of the craftsmanship.我们佩服工艺师精巧的手艺。
  • He sensed the delicacy of the situation.他感觉到了形势的微妙。
70 perfectly 8Mzxb     
adv.完美地,无可非议地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The witnesses were each perfectly certain of what they said.证人们个个对自己所说的话十分肯定。
  • Everything that we're doing is all perfectly above board.我们做的每件事情都是光明正大的。
71 perversity D3kzJ     
n.任性;刚愎自用
参考例句:
  • She's marrying him out of sheer perversity.她嫁给他纯粹是任性。
  • The best of us have a spice of perversity in us.在我们最出色的人身上都有任性的一面。
72 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  • This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  • There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
73 confirmation ZYMya     
n.证实,确认,批准
参考例句:
  • We are waiting for confirmation of the news.我们正在等待证实那个消息。
  • We need confirmation in writing before we can send your order out.给你们发送订购的货物之前,我们需要书面确认。
74 compassionately 40731999c58c9ac729f47f5865d2514f     
adv.表示怜悯地,有同情心地
参考例句:
  • The man at her feet looked up at Scarlett compassionately. 那个躺在思嘉脚边的人同情地仰望着她。 来自飘(部分)
  • Then almost compassionately he said,"You should be greatly rewarded." 接着他几乎带些怜悯似地说:“你是应当得到重重酬报的。” 来自辞典例句
75 portended ee668368f920532349896fc9620e0ecd     
v.预示( portend的过去式和过去分词 );预兆;给…以警告;预告
参考例句:
  • It portended that there was one stone face too many, up at the chateau. 这说明庄园里多出了一张石雕人面。 来自英汉文学 - 双城记
  • She confusedly realised this reversal of her attitudes, but could not make out what it portended. 她糊里糊涂的意识到自己这种相反的态度,但是不知道它会带来什么。 来自辞典例句
76 conspicuous spszE     
adj.明眼的,惹人注目的;炫耀的,摆阔气的
参考例句:
  • It is conspicuous that smoking is harmful to health.很明显,抽烟对健康有害。
  • Its colouring makes it highly conspicuous.它的色彩使它非常惹人注目。
77 speculatively 6f786a35f4960ebbc2f576c1f51f84a4     
adv.思考地,思索地;投机地
参考例句:
  • He looked at her speculatively. 他若有所思的看着她。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • She eyed It'speculatively as a cruel smile appeared on her black lips. 她若有所思地审视它,黑色的嘴角浮起一丝残酷的微笑。 来自互联网
78 brute GSjya     
n.野兽,兽性
参考例句:
  • The aggressor troops are not many degrees removed from the brute.侵略军简直象一群野兽。
  • That dog is a dangerous brute.It bites people.那条狗是危险的畜牲,它咬人。
79 tranquil UJGz0     
adj. 安静的, 宁静的, 稳定的, 不变的
参考例句:
  • The boy disturbed the tranquil surface of the pond with a stick. 那男孩用棍子打破了平静的池面。
  • The tranquil beauty of the village scenery is unique. 这乡村景色的宁静是绝无仅有的。
80 engraved be672d34fc347de7d97da3537d2c3c95     
v.在(硬物)上雕刻(字,画等)( engrave的过去式和过去分词 );将某事物深深印在(记忆或头脑中)
参考例句:
  • The silver cup was engraved with his name. 银杯上刻有他的名字。
  • It was prettily engraved with flowers on the back. 此件雕刻精美,背面有花饰图案。 来自《简明英汉词典》
81 tapestry 7qRy8     
n.挂毯,丰富多采的画面
参考例句:
  • How about this artistic tapestry and this cloisonne vase?这件艺术挂毯和这个景泰蓝花瓶怎么样?
  • The wall of my living room was hung with a tapestry.我的起居室的墙上挂着一块壁毯。
82 destined Dunznz     
adj.命中注定的;(for)以…为目的地的
参考例句:
  • It was destined that they would marry.他们结婚是缘分。
  • The shipment is destined for America.这批货物将运往美国。
83 adorn PydzZ     
vt.使美化,装饰
参考例句:
  • She loved to adorn herself with finery.她喜欢穿戴华丽的服饰。
  • His watercolour designs adorn a wide range of books.他的水彩设计使许多图书大为生色。
84 rite yCmzq     
n.典礼,惯例,习俗
参考例句:
  • This festival descends from a religious rite.这个节日起源于宗教仪式。
  • Most traditional societies have transition rites at puberty.大多数传统社会都为青春期的孩子举行成人礼。
85 helping 2rGzDc     
n.食物的一份&adj.帮助人的,辅助的
参考例句:
  • The poor children regularly pony up for a second helping of my hamburger. 那些可怜的孩子们总是要求我把我的汉堡包再给他们一份。
  • By doing this, they may at times be helping to restore competition. 这样一来, 他在某些时候,有助于竞争的加强。
86 hypocrisy g4qyt     
n.伪善,虚伪
参考例句:
  • He railed against hypocrisy and greed.他痛斥伪善和贪婪的行为。
  • He accused newspapers of hypocrisy in their treatment of the story.他指责了报纸在报道该新闻时的虚伪。
87 sardonic jYyxL     
adj.嘲笑的,冷笑的,讥讽的
参考例句:
  • She gave him a sardonic smile.她朝他讥讽地笑了一笑。
  • There was a sardonic expression on her face.她脸上有一种嘲讽的表情。
88 apparently tMmyQ     
adv.显然地;表面上,似乎
参考例句:
  • An apparently blind alley leads suddenly into an open space.山穷水尽,豁然开朗。
  • He was apparently much surprised at the news.他对那个消息显然感到十分惊异。


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