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Chapter 9 The Flower Of Utah

THIS is not the place to commemorate the trials and privations endured by the immigrant Mormons before they came to their final haven. From the shores of the Mississippi to the western slopes of the Rocky Mountains they had struggled on with a constancy almost unparalleled in history. The savage man, and the savage beast, hunger, thirst, fatigue, and disease -- every impediment which Nature could place in the way, had all been overcome with Anglo-Saxon tenacity. Yet the long journey and the accumulated terrors had shaken the hearts of the stoutest among them. There was not one who did not sink upon his knees in heartfelt prayer when they saw the broad valley of Utah bathed in the sunlight beneath them, and learned from the lips of their leader that this was the promised land, and that these virgin acres were to be theirs for evermore.

Young speedily proved himself to be a skilful administrator as well as a resolute chief. Maps were drawn and charts prepared, in which the future city was sketched out. All around farms were apportioned and allotted in proportion to the standing of each individual. The tradesman was put to his trade and the artisan to his calling. In the town streets and squares sprang up, as if by magic. In the country there was draining and hedging, planting and clearing, until the next summer saw the whole country golden with the wheat crop. Everything prospered in the strange settlement. Above all, the great temple which they had erected in the centre of the city grew ever taller and larger. From the first blush of dawn until the closing of the twilight, the clatter of the hammer and the rasp of the saw was never absent from the monument which the immigrants erected to Him who had led them safe through many dangers.

The two castaways, John Ferrier and the little girl who had shared his fortunes and had been adopted as his daughter, accompanied the Mormons to the end of their great pilgrimage. Little Lucy Ferrier was borne along pleasantly enough in Elder Stangerson's waggon, a retreat which she shared with the Mormon's three wives and with his son, a headstrong forward boy of twelve. Having rallied, with the elasticity of childhood, from the shock caused by her mother's death, she soon became a pet with the women, and reconciled herself to this new life in her moving canvas-covered home. In the meantime Ferrier having recovered from his privations, distinguished himself as a useful guide and an indefatigable hunter. So rapidly did he gain the esteem of his new companions, that when they reached the end of their wanderings, it was unanimously agreed that he should be provided with as large and as fertile a tract of land as any of the settlers, with the exception of Young himself, and of Stangerson, Kemball, Johnston, and Drebber, who were the four principal Elders.

On the farm thus acquired John Ferrier built himself a substantial log-house, which received so many additions in succeeding years that it grew into a roomy villa. He was a man of a practical turn of mind, keen in his dealings and skilful with his hands. His iron constitution enabled him to work morning and evening at improving and tilling his lands. Hence it came about that his farm and all that belonged to him prospered exceedingly. In three years he was better off than his neighbours, in six he was well-to-do, in nine he was rich, and in twelve there were not half a dozen men in the whole of Salt Lake City who could compare with him. From the great inland sea to the distant Wahsatch Mountains there was no name better known than that of John Ferrier.

There was one way and only one in which he offended the susceptibilities of his co-religionists. No argument or persuasion could ever induce him to set up a female establishment after the manner of his companions. He never gave reasons for this persistent refusal, but contented himself by resolutely and inflexibly adhering to his determination. There were some who accused him of lukewarmness in his adopted religion, and others who put it down to greed of wealth and reluctance to incur expense. Others, again, spoke of some early love affair, and of a fair-haired girl who had pined away on the shores of the Atlantic. Whatever the reason, Ferrier remained strictly celibate. In every other respect he conformed to the religion of the young settlement, and gained the name of being an orthodox and straight-walking man.

Lucy Ferrier grew up within the log-house, and assisted her adopted father in all his undertakings. The keen air of the mountains and the balsamic odour of the pine trees took the place of nurse and mother to the young girl. As year succeeded to year she grew taller and stronger, her cheek more rudy, and her step more elastic. Many a wayfarer upon the high road which ran by Ferrier's farm felt long-forgotten thoughts revive in their mind as they watched her lithe girlish figure tripping through the wheatfields, or met her mounted upon her father's mustang, and managing it with all the ease and grace of a true child of the West. So the bud blossomed into a flower, and the year which saw her father the richest of the farmers left her as fair a specimen of American girlhood as could be found in the whole Pacific slope.

It was not the father, however, who first discovered that the child had developed into the woman. It seldom is in such cases. That mysterious change is too subtle and too gradual to be measured by dates. Least of all does the maiden herself know it until the tone of a voice or the touch of a hand sets her heart thrilling within her, and she learns, with a mixture of pride and of fear, that a new and a larger nature has awoken within her. There are few who cannot recall that day and remember the one little incident which heralded the dawn of a new life. In the case of Lucy Ferrier the occasion was serious enough in itself, apart from its future influence on her destiny and that of many besides.

It was a warm June morning, and the Latter Day Saints were as busy as the bees whose hive they have chosen for their emblem. In the fields and in the streets rose the same hum of human industry. Down the dusty high roads defiled long streams of heavily-laden mules, all heading to the west, for the gold fever had broken out in California, and the Overland Route lay through the City of the Elect. There, too, were droves of sheep and bullocks coming in from the outlying pasture lands, and trains of tired immigrants, men and horses equally weary of their interminable journey. Through all this motley assemblage, threading her way with the skill of an accomplished rider, there galloped Lucy Ferrier, her fair face flushed with the exercise and her long chestnut hair floating out behind her. She had a commission from her father in the City, and was dashing in as she had done many a time before, with all the fearlessness of youth, thinking only of her task and how it was to be performed. The travel-stained adventurers gazed after her in astonishment, and even the unemotional Indians, journeying in with their pelties, relaxed their accustomed stoicism as they marvelled at the beauty of the pale-faced maiden.

She had reached the outskirts of the city when she found the road blocked by a great drove of cattle, driven by a half-dozen wild-looking herdsmen from the plains. In her impatience she endeavoured to pass this obstacle by pushing her horse into what appeared to be a gap. Scarcely had she got fairly into it, however, before the beasts closed in behind her, and she found herself completely imbedded in the moving stream of fierce-eyed, long-horned bullocks. Accustomed as she was to deal with cattle, she was not alarmed at her situation, but took advantage of every opportunity to urge her horse on in the hopes of pushing her way through the cavalcade. Unfortunately the horns of one of the creatures, either by accident or design, came in violent contact with the flank of the mustang, and excited it to madness. In an instant it reared up upon its hind legs with a snort of rage, and pranced and tossed in a way that would have unseated any but a most skilful rider. The situation was full of peril. Every plunge of the excited horse brought it against the horns again, and goaded it to fresh madness. It was all that the girl could do to keep herself in the saddle, yet a slip would mean a terrible death under the hoofs of the unwieldy and terrified animals. Unaccustomed to sudden emergencies, her head began to swim, and her grip upon the bridle to relax. Choked by the rising cloud of dust and by the steam from the struggling creatures, she might have abandoned her efforts in despair, but for a kindly voice at her elbow which assured her of assistance. At the same moment a sinewy brown hand caught the frightened horse by the curb, and forcing a way through the drove, soon brought her to the outskirts.

"You're not hurt, I hope, miss," said her preserver, respectfully.

She looked up at his dark, fierce face, and laughed saucily. "I'm awful frightened," she said, naively; "whoever would have thought that Poncho would have been so scared by a lot of cows?"

"Thank God you kept your seat," the other said earnestly. He was a tall, savage-looking young fellow, mounted on a powerful roan horse, and clad in the rough dress of a hunter, with a long rifle slung over his shoulders. "I guess you are the daughter of John Ferrier," he remarked, "I saw you ride down from his house. When you see him, ask him if he remembers the Jefferson Hopes of St. Louis. If he's the same Ferrier, my father and he were pretty thick."

"Hadn't you better come and ask yourself?" she asked, demurely.

The young fellow seemed pleased at the suggestion, and his dark eyes sparkled with pleasure. "I'll do so," he said, "we've been in the mountains for two months, and are not over and above in visiting condition. He must take us as he finds us."

"He has a good deal to thank you for, and so have I," she answered, "he's awful fond of me. If those cows had jumped on me he'd have never got over it."

"Neither would I," said her companion.

"You! Well, I don't see that it would make much matter to you, anyhow. You ain't even a friend of ours."

The young hunter's dark face grew so gloomy over this remark that Lucy Ferrier laughed aloud.

"There, I didn't mean that," she said; "of course, you are a friend now. You must come and see us. Now I must push along, or father won't trust me with his business any more. Good-bye!"

"Good-bye," he answered, raising his broad sombrero, and bending over her little hand. She wheeled her mustang round, gave it a cut with her riding-whip, and darted away down the broad road in a rolling cloud of dust.

Young Jefferson Hope rode on with his companions, gloomy and taciturn. He and they had been among the Nevada Mountains prospecting for silver, and were returning to Salt Lake City in the hope of raising capital enough to work some lodes which they had discovered. He had been as keen as any of them upon the business until this sudden incident had drawn his thoughts into another channel. The sight of the fair young girl, as frank and wholesome as the Sierra breezes, had stirred his volcanic, untamed heart to its very depths. When she had vanished from his sight, he realized that a crisis had come in his life, and that neither silver speculations nor any other questions could ever be of such importance to him as this new and all-absorbing one. The love which had sprung up in his heart was not the sudden, changeable fancy of a boy, but rather the wild, fierce passion of a man of strong will and imperious temper. He had been accustomed to succeed in all that he undertook. He swore in his heart that he would not fail in this if human effort and human perseverance could render him successful.

He called on John Ferrier that night, and many times again, until his face was a familiar one at the farm-house. John, cooped up in the valley, and absorbed in his work, had had little chance of learning the news of the outside world during the last twelve years. All this Jefferson Hope was able to tell him, and in a style which interested Lucy as well as her father. He had been a pioneer in California, and could narrate many a strange tale of fortunes made and fortunes lost in those wild, halcyon days. He had been a scout too, and a trapper, a silver explorer, and a ranchman. Wherever stirring adventures were to be had, Jefferson Hope had been there in search of them. He soon became a favourite with the old farmer, who spoke eloquently of his virtues. On such occasions, Lucy was silent, but her blushing cheek and her bright, happy eyes, showed only too clearly that her young heart was no longer her own. Her honest father may not have observed these symptoms, but they were assuredly not thrown away upon the man who had won her affections.

It was a summer evening when he came galloping down the road and pulled up at the gate. She was at the doorway, and came down to meet him. He threw the bridle over the fence and strode up the pathway.

"I am off, Lucy," he said, taking her two hands in his, and gazing tenderly down into her face; "I won't ask you to come with me now, but will you be ready to come when I am here again?"

"And when will that be?" she asked, blushing and laughing.

"A couple of months at the outside. I will come and claim you then, my darling. There's no one who can stand between us."

"And how about father?" she asked.

"He has given his consent, provided we get these mines working all right. I have no fear on that head."

"Oh, well; of course, if you and father have arranged it all, there's no more to be said," she whispered, with her cheek against his broad breast.

"Thank God!" he said, hoarsely, stooping and kissing her. "It is settled, then. The longer I stay, the harder it will be to go. They are waiting for me at the canon. Good-bye, my own darling -- good-bye. In two months you shall see me."

He tore himself from her as he spoke, and, flinging himself upon his horse, galloped furiously away, never even looking round, as though afraid that his resolution might fail him if he took one glance at what he was leaving. She stood at the gate, gazing after him until he vanished from her sight. Then she walked back into the house, the happiest girl in all Utah.

 

这里不打算追述摩门教徒们最后定居以前在移民历程中所遭受的苦难情况。他们在密西西比河两岸一直到洛矶山脉西麓这篇土地上,几乎是以史无前例的坚忍不拔的精神奋斗前进的。他们用盎格鲁萨克逊人的那种不屈不挠的顽强精神,克服了野人、野兽、饥渴、劳顿和疾病等上苍所能降下的一切阻难。但是,长途跋涉和无尽的恐怖,即使他们中间最为坚强的人也不免为之胆寒。因此,当他们看到脚下广阔的犹他山谷浴在一起阳光之中,并且听到他们的领袖宣称,这篇处女地就是神赐予他们的乐土家园,而且将永远属于他们的时候,莫不俯首下跪,掬诚膜拜。

①郇山是耶路撒冷的地名,为基督教圣地。此处借用,指摩门教徒们行将择居之地。——译者注

没有多久,事实就证明了:扬不但是一个处事果断的领袖,而且还是一个干练的行政官。许多规划图制定以后,未来城市的面貌也就有了个轮廓。城市周围的全部土地,都根据每个教徒的身分高低,按比例加以分配。商人仍然经商,工人照旧作工。城市中的街道、广场象魔术变化一般地先后出现了。乡村中,开沟浚壑、造篱立界、栽培垦殖,一片生产气象;到了第二年的夏天,整个乡村便涌现出万顷麦浪,一起金黄。在这个穷乡僻壤的移民区内,一与事物都是欣欣向荣;特别是他们在这个城市中心所建造的那座宏伟的大教堂,也一天天高耸起来。每天从晨光曦微一直到暮色四合,教堂里传来的斧锯之声,不绝于耳。这座建筑是这班移民用来纪念那位引导他们度过无数艰险、终于到达平安境地的上帝的。

约翰·费瑞厄和小女孩相依为命,小女孩不久便被费瑞厄认为义女。这两个落难人随着这群摩门教徒来到了他们伟大历程的终点。小露茜·费瑞厄被收留在长老斯坦节逊的篷车里,非常受人喜爱。她和斯坦节逊的三个妻子,还有他那任性、早熟的十二岁的儿子同住在一起,露茜不久便恢复了健康。由于她年幼温顺,而且小小年纪便失去了母亲,因此立刻就得到了这三个女人的宠爱。露茜对于这样漂泊无定、帐幕之下为家的新生活也逐渐习惯起来。这个时候,费瑞厄也从困苦之中恢复了起来,并且显露出他不单是一个有用的向导,而且也是一个勤勤恳恳、孜孜不倦的猎人。因此,他很快地就获得了新伙伴们的尊敬。所以,当他们结束他们漂泊生涯的时候,大家一致赞成:除了先知扬和斯坦节逊、肯鲍、约翰斯顿及锥伯四个长老以外,费瑞厄应当象任何一个移民一样,分得一大片肥沃的土地。

费瑞厄就这样获得了他的一份土地。他在这篇土地上建筑了一座坚实的木屋。这座木屋由于逐年增建,渐渐成了一所宽敞的别墅。费瑞厄是一个重视实际的人,为人处世精明,长于技艺。他的体格也十分健壮,这就使他能够从早到晚,孜孜不倦地在他的土地上进行耕作和改良。因此,他的田庄非常兴旺。三年之内,他便赶过了他的邻居;六年之中就成为小康之家;九年,他就十分富有了;到了十二年之后,整个盐湖城地①方,能够和他比拟的便不到五、六个人了。从盐湖这个内陆海起,一直到遥远的瓦撒起山区为止,在这个地区以内,再没有比约翰·费瑞厄的声名更大的了。

但是,只有一件事,费瑞厄却伤害了他同教人的感情。这便是,不管怎样和他争论,不管怎样向他劝说,都不能使他按照他的伙伴们那种方式娶妻成家。他从来没有说明他一再拒绝这样做的理由究竟是什么,他只是坚决而毫不动摇地固执己见。因此,有些人指责他对于他所信奉的宗教并不虔诚。也有一些人认为他是吝啬财物,不肯破费。还有一些人猜测他早先必定有过一番恋爱经历,也许在大西洋沿岸有过一位金发女郎,曾经为他憔悴而死。不管原因是什么,费瑞厄却依然故我地过着严谨的独身生活。除了这一点以外,在其他各个方面,他对于这个新兴殖民地上的这个宗教却是奉行不懈的,而且被公认为是一个笃信正教、行为正派的人。

①盐湖城是美国犹他州首府,地濒盐湖之滨。——译者注

露茜·费瑞厄在这个木屋中长大片来,她帮助义父处理一切事务。山区清新的空气和松林中飘溢的脂香,都象慈母般地抚育着这个年轻的少女。岁月一年又一年地过去了,露茜也一年年长大成人了;她长得亭亭玉立,十分健美,她的面颊愈见娇艳,她的步态也日益轻盈。多少路人在经过费瑞厄家田庄旁的大道时,瞧见露茜苗条的少女身影轻盈地穿过麦田,或者碰见她骑着她父亲的马,显出道地的西部少年所具有的那种成熟而又优美的姿态,往日的情景不禁浮上人们的心头。当年的葩蕾今天已经开放成一朵好花。这些年来,岁月一面使她的父亲变成了农民中最富裕的人,同时,也使她长成为太平洋沿岸整个山区里难得的一个标致的美洲少女。

但是,第一个感觉到这个女孩子已经长大成人的并不是她的父亲。这种事情很少是由作父亲的首先发觉的。这种神秘的变化十分微妙,而且形成得非常缓慢,不能以时日来衡量。对于这种变化最难觉察的还是少女本身,直到她听到某一个人的话语,或者接触到某人的手时,她感到心头突突乱跳,产生出一种骄傲和恐惧交织起来的情感。这时,她才知道,一种新破的、更加奔放的人的本性已经在她的内心深处觉醒了。世界上很少有人能不忆起自己当年的情景,很少有人能不回想起起示他新生命已经到来的那件细微琐事。至于露茜·费瑞厄,姑且不论这件事对于她和其他人的未来命运所产生的影响如何,就其本身来说,已经是够严重的了。

六月里的一个温暖的早晨,摩门教徒们象蜂群一样地忙碌着——他们就是以蜂巢作为他们的标志的。田野里,街道上,到处都有人们劳动时的嘈杂声。尘土飞扬的大道上,重载的骡群,川流不息地络绎而过,全都是朝着西方进发。这时,加利福尼亚州正涌起了采金的热潮。横贯大陆、通往太平洋沿岸的大道整整穿过依雷克特这座新城。大道上也有从遥远的牧区赶来的成群牛羊;也有一队队疲惫的移民,经过长途跋涉之后,显得人困马乏。在这人畜杂沓之中,露茜·费瑞厄仗着她的骑术高明,纵马穿行而过;漂亮的面庞由于用力而红了起来,栗色的长发在脑后飘荡着。她是奉了父亲之命,前往城中办事的。她象往常一样,凭着年轻人的胆大,不顾一切地催马前进,心中只是盘算着她要去办的事情。那些风尘仆仆的淘金冒险家,一个个惊破地瞧着她,就连那些运输皮革的冷漠的印第安人,瞧见了这个美丽无比的白皙的少女,也感到十分惊愕,不禁松弛了他们一向呆板的面孔。

露茜来到城郊时,她发现有六个面目粗野的牧人,从大草原赶来了一群牛,牛群已把道路拥塞不通。她在一旁等得不耐烦,于是就朝着牛群中的空隙策马前进,打算越过这群障碍。但是,当她刚刚进入牛群,后面的牛就都挤拢了来,她立刻发觉自己已陷入了一起牛海之中,到处都是突睛长角的庞然大物在蜂拥钻动。她平日也是和牛群相处惯了的,因此,虽然处在这种境地中,也并没有感到惊慌,仍是抓紧空隙催马前进,打算从中穿过。可是不巧,一头牛有意无意地用角猛触了一下马的侧腹,马受惊立刻狂怒起来。它立刻将前蹄腾跃而起,狂嘶不已;它颠簸摇摆得十分厉害,若不是头等起手,任何人都难免被摔下马来。当时情况十分危险。惊马每跳动一次,就免不了又一次受到牛角的抵触,这就越发使它暴跳不已。这时,露茜只有紧贴马鞍,毫无其他办法。稍一失手,就要落在乱蹄之下,被踩得粉碎。由于她没有经历过意外,这时,便感到头昏眼花起来,手中紧紧拉着的缰绳,眼看就要放松。同时尘土飞扬,再加上拥挤的兽群里蒸发出来的气味使人透不过起来。在这紧要关头,如果不是身旁出现了一种亲切的声音,使她确信有人前来相助,露茜眼看就要绝望,不能再坚持下去了。这时,一只强有力的棕色大手,一把捉住了惊马的嚼环,并且在牛群中挤出了一条出路,不大功夫,就把她带到了兽群之外。

这位救星彬彬有礼地问道:“小姐,但愿你没有受伤。”

她抬起头来,瞧了一下他那张黧黑而粗犷的脸,毫不在乎地笑了起来。她天真地说:“真把我吓坏了。谁会想到旁乔这马儿竟会被一群牛吓成这个样子!”

他诚恳地说:“谢天谢地,幸亏你抱紧了马鞍子。"这是一个高高身材、面目粗野的年轻小伙子,骑着一匹身带灰白斑点的骏马,身上穿着一件结实的粗布猎服,肩上背着一只长筒来复枪。他说:“我想,你是约翰·费瑞厄的女儿吧。我看见你从他的庄园那边骑了过来。你见着他的时候,请你问问他还记不记得圣路易地方的杰弗逊·侯波这一家人。如果他就是那个费瑞厄的话,我的父亲过去和他还是非常亲密的朋友呢。”

她一本正经地说:“你自己去问问他,不更好么?”

这个小伙子听到了这个建议,似乎感到很高兴,他的黑色眼睛中闪耀着快乐的光辉。他说:“我要这样做的。我们在大山中已经呆了两个月了,现在这副模样不便去拜访。可是他见着我们的时候,他一定会招待我们的。”

她回答说:“他一定要大大地感谢你哩。我也要谢谢你。他非常喜欢我,要是那些牛把我踩死的话,他不知道要怎样伤心哩。”

她的同伴说:“我也会很伤心呢。”

“你?啊,我怎么也看不出这和你又有什么关系。你还不算是我们的朋友呢。”

这个年青猎人听了这句话后,黝黑的面孔不由得阴沉下来,露茜见了不觉大声笑了起来。

她说:“你瞧,我的意思不是那样。当然,现在你已经是朋友了。你一定要来看看我们。现在我必须走了,不然的话,父亲以后就不会再把他的事情交给我办啦。再见罢!”

“再见。"他一面回答,一面举其他那顶墨西哥式的阔檐帽,低下头去吻了一下她的小手。她掉转马头,扬鞭打马,在烟尘滚滚之中沿着大道飞驰而去。

小杰弗逊·侯波和他的伙伴们骑着马继续前进。一路上,他心情抑郁,默默无言。他和他们一直在内华达山脉中寻找银矿,现在正在返回盐湖城去,打算筹集一笔足够的资金开采他们所发现的那些矿藏。以前,对于这种事业,他一向是和他的任何一个伙伴一样地非常热衷的;但是,这件意外的遭遇却把他的思想引上了另一条道路上去。这个美丽的少女,好象山上的微风那样清新、纯洁;这就深深触动了他的那颗火山般的奔放不羁的心。当她的身影从他的视线中消逝以后,他感觉到这是他生命上最紧要的关头,银矿也好,其他任何问题也罢,对他说来,都比不上这件刚刚发生的,吸引他全部心神的事情来得重要。在他心中出现的爱情,已经不是一个孩子的那种忽生忽灭、变化无常的幻想,而是一个意志坚定、个性刚毅的男人的那种奔放强烈的激情。他平生所做的事情,从来没有不是称心如愿的。因此,他暗暗发誓,只要通过人类的努力和恒心能够使他获得成功的话,那么这一次他也决不会失败。

当天晚上,他就去拜访了约翰·费瑞厄;以后,他又去了许多趟,终于混得彼此非常熟悉起来。约翰·费瑞厄深居山谷之中,十二年来,他专心一意地从事他的田庄工作,几乎与外界隔绝。侯波对于这些年来的事情非常熟悉,因此他能把他所见所闻,一样样地讲给他听。他讲得有声有色,不但使这位父亲听得津津有味,就连露茜也感到非常有趣。侯波也是当年最早到达加利福尼亚的一个,因此,他能够说出,在那些遍地黄金,全起暴力的日子里,多少人发财致富,多少人倾家荡产。他做过斥候,捕捉过野兽,也曾寻找过银矿,并且在收场里当过工人。只要哪里传出有冒险的事业,他就要前去探求一番。很快地他就获得了老农的欢心,他不断地夸奖着侯波。在这当儿,露茜总是默默无言。但是,她那红晕的双颊、明亮而幸福的眼睛,都非常清楚地说明,她的那颗年轻的心,已经不再属于她自己了。她那诚起的老父也许还没有看出这些征兆,但无疑地,这些征兆并没有逃过这个赢得她芳心的小伙子的那双眼睛。

一个夏天的傍晚,侯波起着马从大道上疾驰而过,向着费瑞厄家门口跑来。露茜正在门口,她走向前去迎接他。他把缰绳抛在篱垣上,大踏步沿着门前小径走了过来。

“我要走了,露茜,"他说着,一面握住她的两只手,温柔地瞧着她的脸,“现在我不要求你马上跟我一块儿走,但是当我回来的时候,你能不能决定和我走呢?”

“可是,你什么时候回来呢?"她含羞带笑地问道。

“顶多两个月,亲爱的。那个时候,你就要属于我了,谁也阻挡不了咱们。”

她问道:“可是,父亲的意见怎么样?”

“他已经同意了,只要我们的银矿进行得顺利就行。我倒并不担心这个问题。”

“哦,那就行了。只要你和父亲把一切都安排好了,那就用不着多说了。"她轻轻地说着,一面把她的面颊偎依在他那宽阔的胸膛上。

“感谢上帝!"他声音粗哑地说,一面弯下身去吻着她,“那么,事情就这样决定了。我愈呆得久,就会愈加难舍难分。他们还在峡谷里等着我呢。再见吧,我的亲爱的,再见了!不到两个月,你一定就会见到我了。”

他一边说,一边从她的怀里挣脱出来,翻身上马,头也不回地奔驰而去,好象只要他稍一回顾他所离别的人儿,他的决心就要动摇了。她站在门旁,久久地望着他,一直到他的身影消逝不见。然后她才走进屋去,她真是整个犹他地方最幸福的一个姑娘了。



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