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Chapter 14 The Parting
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ON the day after the events described, the carriage and the luggage-cart drew up to the door at noon. Nicola, dressed for the journey, with his breeches tucked into his boots and an old overcoat belted tightly about him with a girdle, got into the cart and arranged cloaks and cushions on the seats. When he thought that they were piled high enough he sat down on them, but finding them still unsatisfactory, jumped up and arranged them once more.

"Nicola Dimitvitch, would you be so good as to take master's dressing-case with you? " said Papa's valet, suddenly standing1 up in the carriage, " It won't take up much room."

"You should have told me before, Michael Ivanitch," answered Nicola snappishly as he hurled2 a bundle with all his might to the floor of the cart. "Good gracious! Why, when my head is going round like a whirlpool, there you come along with your dressing- case!" and he lifted his cap to wipe away the drops of perspiration3 from his sunburnt brow.

The courtyard was full of bareheaded peasants in kaftans or simple shirts, women clad in the national dress and wearing striped handkerchiefs, and barefooted little ones--the latter holding their mothers' hands or crowding round the entrance- steps. All were chattering4 among themselves as they stared at the carriage. One of the postillions, an old man dressed in a winter cap and cloak, took hold of the pole of the carriage and tried it carefully, while the other postillion (a young man in a white blouse with pink gussets on the sleeves and a black lamb's-wool cap which he kept cocking first on one side and then on the other as he arranged his flaxen hair) laid his overcoat upon the box, slung5 the reins6 over it, and cracked his thonged7 whip as he looked now at his boots and now at the other drivers where they stood greasing the wheels of the cart--one driver lifting up each wheel in turn and the other driver applying the grease. Tired post-horses of various hues9 stood lashing10 away flies with their tails near the gate--some stamping their great hairy legs, blinking their eyes, and dozing11, some leaning wearily against their neighbours, and others cropping the leaves and stalks of dark-green fern which grew near the entrance-steps. Some of the dogs were lying panting in the sun, while others were slinking under the vehicles to lick the grease from the wheels. The air was filled with a sort of dusty mist, and the horizon was lilac- grey in colour, though no clouds were to be seen, A strong wind from the south was raising volumes of dust from the roads and fields, shaking the poplars and birch-trees in the garden, and whirling their yellow leaves away. I myself was sitting at a window and waiting impatiently for these various preparations to come to an end.

As we sat together by the drawing-room table, to pass the last few moments en famille, it never occurred to me that a sad moment was impending13. On the contrary, the most trivial thoughts were filling my brain. Which driver was going to drive the carriage and which the cart? Which of us would sit with Papa, and which with Karl Ivanitch? Why must I be kept forever muffled14 up in a scarf and padded boots?

"Am I so delicate? Am I likely to be frozen?" I thought to myself. "I wish it would all come to an end, and we could take our seats and start."

"To whom shall I give the list of the children's linen15?" asked Natalia Savishna of Mamma as she entered the room with a paper in her hand and her eyes red with weeping.

"Give it to Nicola, and then return to say good-bye to them," replied Mamma. The old woman seemed about to say something more, but suddenly stopped short, covered her face with her handkerchief, and left the room. Something seemed to prick16 at my heart when I saw that gesture of hers, but impatience17 to be off soon drowned all other feeling, and I continued to listen indifferently to Papa and Mamma as they talked together. They were discussing subjects which evidently interested neither of them. What must be bought for the house? What would Princess Sophia or Madame Julie say? Would the roads be good?--and so forth18.

Foka entered, and in the same tone and with the same air as though he were announcing luncheon19 said, "The carriages are ready." I saw Mamma tremble and turn pale at the announcement, just as though it were something unexpected.

Next, Foka was ordered to shut all the doors of the room. This amused me highly. As though we needed to be concealed20 from some one! When every one else was seated, Foka took the last remaining chair. Scarcely, however, had he done so when the door creaked and every one looked that way. Natalia Savishna entered hastily, and, without raising her eyes, sat own on the same chair as Foka. I can see them before me now-Foka's bald head and wrinkled, set face, and, beside him, a bent21, kind figure in a cap from beneath which a few grey hairs were straggling. The pair settled themselves together on the chair, but neither of them looked comfortable.

I continued preoccupied22 and impatient. In fact, the ten minutes during which we sat there with closed doors seemed to me an hour. At last every one rose, made the sign of the cross, and began to say good-bye. Papa embraced Mamma, and kissed her again and again.

"But enough," he said presently. "We are not parting for ever."

"No, but it is-so-so sad! " replied Mamma, her voice trembling with emotion.

When I heard that faltering23 voice, and saw those quivering lips and tear-filled eyes, I forgot everything else in the world. I felt so ill and miserable24 that I would gladly have run away rather than bid her farewell. I felt, too, that when she was embracing Papa she was embracing us all. She clasped Woloda to her several times, and made the sign of the cross over him; after which I approached her, thinking that it was my turn. Nevertheless she took him again and again to her heart, and blessed him. Finally I caught hold of her, and, clinging to her, wept--wept, thinking of nothing in the world but my grief.

As we passed out to take our seats, other servants pressed round us in the hall to say good-bye. Yet their requests to shake hands with us, their resounding25 kisses on our shoulders, [The fashion in which inferiors salute26 their superiors in Russia.] and the odour of their greasy27 heads only excited in me a feeling akin12 to impatience with these tiresome28 people. The same feeling made me bestow29 nothing more than a very cross kiss upon Natalia's cap when she approached to take leave of me. It is strange that I should still retain a perfect recollection of these servants' faces, and be able to draw them with the most minute accuracy in my mind, while Mamma's face and attitude escape me entirely30. It may be that it is because at that moment I had not the heart to look at her closely. I felt that if I did so our mutual31 grief would burst forth too unrestrainedly.

I was the first to jump into the carriage and to take one of the hinder seats. The high back of the carriage prevented me from actually seeing her, yet I knew by instinct that Mamma was still there.

"Shall I look at her again or not?" I said to myself. "Well, just for the last time," and I peeped out towards the entrance- steps. Exactly at that moment Mamma moved by the same impulse, came to the opposite side of the carriage, and called me by name. Rearing her voice behind me. I turned round, but so hastily that our heads knocked together. She gave a sad smile, and kissed me convulsively for the last time.

When we had driven away a few paces I determined32 to look at her once more. The wind was lifting the blue handkerchief from her head as, bent forward and her face buried in her hands, she moved slowly up the steps. Foka was supporting her. Papa said nothing as he sat beside me. I felt breathless with tears--felt a sensation in my throat as though I were going to choke, just as we came out on to the open road I saw a white handkerchief waving from the terrace. I waved mine in return, and the action of so doing calmed me a little. I still went on crying. but the thought that my tears were a proof of my affection helped to soothe33 and comfort me.

After a little while I began to recover, and to look with interest at objects which we passed and at the hind-quarters of the led horse which was trotting34 on my side. I watched how it would swish its tail, how it would lift one hoof35 after the other, how the driver's thong8 would fall upon its back, and how all its legs would then seem to jump together and the back-band, with the rings on it, to jump too--the whole covered with the horse's foam36. Then I would look at the rolling stretches of ripe corn, at the dark ploughed fields where ploughs and peasants and horses with foals were working, at their footprints, and at the box of the carriage to see who was driving us; until, though my face was still wet with tears, my thoughts had strayed far from her with whom I had just parted--parted, perhaps, for ever. Yet ever and again something would recall her to my memory. I remembered too how, the evening before, I had found a mushroom under the birch- trees, how Lubotshka had quarrelled with Katenka as to whose it should be, and how they had both of them wept when taking leave of us. I felt sorry to be parted from them, and from Natalia Savishna, and from the birch-tree avenue, and from Foka. Yes, even the horrid37 Mimi I longed for. I longed for everything at home. And poor Mamma!--The tears rushed to my eyes again. Yet even this mood passed away before long.

 

我在上面所写的那些事发生的第二天上午十一点多钟,一辆装有弹簧的四轮马车和一辆小四轮马车停在大门口。尼古拉是上路的打扮,就是说,把裤腿塞到靴子里,把旧礼服用腰带紧紧地束起来。他站在四轮马车里,把外套和靠垫铺到座位上;他觉得太高,于是坐到靠垫上,不住地跳动着,把它们压下去。

“看在老天爷的份上,尼古拉·德米特里奇,把主人的小匣于放在您那边行不行?”爸爸的仆人喘吁吁地恳求着说,从装有弹簧的四轮马车里探出头来。“匣子很小……”

“您应该早些说,米海伊·伊凡内奇,”尼古拉很快地、气愤地回答说,然后用足力气把一个包裹丢在小四轮马车的车厢里。“说真的,我的脑袋本来就晕了,您偏偏又来上个小匣子!”他补充一句说,推了推帽子,擦掉被太阳晒黑的前额上的大汗珠。

家里的男仆都光着头,穿着常礼服、普通长衣,或者衬衣;妇女们穿着粗布衣服,头上包着条纹头巾,怀里抱着婴儿;还有赤脚的孩子们,都站在门口,望着马车,彼此交谈着。有二个车夫是个驼背的老头儿,戴着暖帽,穿着厚呢上衣,扶着马车的辕杆,摸弄着它,仔细打量着车轴。另外一个是漂亮的小伙子,穿着腋下有红布镶条的白衬衫,他搔着鬈曲的金发,一会儿把圆锥形的黑毡帽推到这只耳朵上,一会儿推到另一只耳朵上;把厚呢上衣放在驭台上,把缰绳也扔上去,他不时用他那编制的小鞭轻轻地抽打一下,一会儿望望自己的靴子,一会儿望望给小四轮马车涂油的车夫。有一个车夫使劲托着车子;另一个俯在车轮上,正仔细往车轴和车毂上涂油,为了不浪费留在刷子上的滑润油,甚至就把它涂在车轮边上。几匹毛色不同的、疲惫无力的驿马站在篱笆旁边,用尾巴驱拂着苍蝇。它们有的伸出毛茸茸的肿了的腿,眯缝着眼睛打瞌睡;有的因为无聊,就互相搔痒,或者咀嚼长在台阶旁边的粗糙的、暗绿色的羊齿植物的叶子和草茎。几条狼狗,有的卧在阳光下沉重地喘着气,有的走到两辆马车的阴影里,舐车轴上涂的油。空气中充满了灰蒙蒙的尘雾,地平线上呈现一片紫灰色,天空却没有一片乌云。一阵猛烈的西风从大路上和田野里卷起一股股尘土,吹弯了花园里高大的菩提树和白桦树的树梢,把枯黄的落叶刮到远方去。我坐在窗口,急不可耐地等待着一切准备停当。

当大家坐在客厅里,围着圆桌共同消磨最后的几分钟的时候,我根本没有想到我们将要面临着多么悲惨的时刻。最最无聊的思想掠过我的脑际。我暗自思量,不知哪个车夫赶小四轮马车,哪个车夫赶装着弹簧的马车?谁跟着爸爸,谁跟着卡尔·伊凡内奇?他们为什么一定要我围围巾,穿棉袄呢?

“难道我是个娇宝贝?我大概不会冻死。但愿这一切赶快弄好,就可以坐上车走啦!”

“请吩咐一声,我把孩子们的衣服清单交给谁呀?”娜达丽雅·萨维什娜含着泪,拿着一张字条走进来,对妈妈说。

“交给尼古拉,然后就同孩子们告别吧。”

老妇人想说什么,但是突然停住不响了,用手帕捂住脸,挥了挥手,就走出屋去。我看见这个举动,感到有些心酸,但是急.着上路的心情比这种情绪更强烈,我仍旧漫不经心地听着爸爸和妈妈谈话。他们在谈论分明双方都不感兴趣的问题:给家里买什么?对苏菲公爵小姐和朱丽叶讲些什么?路好不好走?

福加走进来,站在门口,恰恰象他平时报告:“饭准备好了!”的腔调一样,说了声:“马套好了!”我发觉,妈妈一听见这个消息就哆嗦了一下,脸色苍白,好象出乎她意料之外似的。

吩咐福加关上那个房间所有的门。这使我觉得很有趣,“好象大家在躲着什么人似的!”

大家都坐下来,福加也挨着椅子边坐下;但是他刚一坐下,门就咯吱响了一声,于是大家都回头看了看。娜达丽雅·萨维什娜匆匆忙忙走进屋来,眼睛抬也不抬,就在门边同福加坐在一张椅子上。我现在还好象看见福加的秃头,他那布满皱纹的、呆板的面孔和那个戴着包发帽,从帽下露出白发的慈祥老妇人的驼背身姿。他们挤着坐在一张椅子上,两个人都很局促不安。

我仍旧漠不关心,而且急不可耐。我觉得,关上门静坐的这十秒钟简直好象是整整一个钟头。最后大家终于都站起来,画了十字,开始告别。爸爸搂住妈妈,吻了她好几次。

“好了,我心爱的人!”爸爸说,“我们并不是永别呀!”

“终归是很伤心的!”妈妈说,因为含着泪,她的声音都发颤了。

我一听见这种声音,一看见她那抖动的嘴唇和含满泪水的眼睛,一切就都忘到九霄去外,我感到非常悲哀、痛苦和可怕,我真想跑掉,不愿和她告别。我这一瞬间才明白,她拥抱爸爸,也就是和我们告别了。

她吻了沃洛佳那么多次,在他身上画了那么多次十字,我以为,现在该轮到我了,于是就钻到前面去;但是,她一次又一次地替他祝福,把他紧紧抱在怀里。最后我搂住她,恋恋不舍地依偎着她,哭了又哭,什么都不想,只想着我的伤心事。

我们要上马车的时候,令人讨厌的仆人们在前厅里同我们告别。他们所说的“让我吻吻您的手”,他们印在我肩膀上的响吻和他们头上的油脂气味,在我心中唤起一种近似易于激动的人所感到的伤心的心情。在这种心情的支配下,当娜达丽雅·萨维什娜泪流满面向我告别的时候,我非常冷淡地吻了吻她的包发帽。

奇怪的是,我现在还好象看到所有仆人的面孔,而且能够细致入微地描绘出来;但是妈妈的容貌和姿态我却完全忘记了,也许这是因为我一直都鼓不起勇气来看她一眼。我觉得,如果我这么做,我和她的悲哀就会达到难以忍受的地步。

我抢先跑上装着弹簧的四轮马车,坐在后座上,撑起的车篷使我看不见任何东西,但是我的本能告诉我,妈妈还在马车旁边。

“我要不要再看看她?……是的,最后一次!”我自言自语地说着,从马车里探出头朝台阶望去。这时候,妈妈怀着同样的想法从马车的另一边走来,呼唤我的名字。听见她在身后叫我的声音,我就扭过身来,但是由于扭得太快,结果我们的头撞在一起了。她苦笑了一下,最后又非常、非常热烈地吻了我一次。

我们走了几丈的时候,我决定再看她一眼。一阵风吹起她头上那块小小的蓝头巾;她低着头,双手捂着脸,慢慢地走上台阶。福加扶着她。

爸爸坐在我身边,什么也没有说;我哭得喘不上气来,我的噪子象被什么东西哽住了,我简直害怕会闷死……上了大路,我们看见凉台上有人在挥白手帕。我开始挥我的手帕,这种动作使我平静了一点。我继续哭着;一想到我的眼泪足以证明我多情善感,就感高兴和欣慰。

走了一里左右,我坐得更舒适些,开始聚精会神地凝视眼前最近的物体——在我这边奔驰的拉边套马的臀部。我看看那匹花马怎样甩动尾巴,一只脚怎样叩打另一只,车夫的编制的马鞭怎样落到它身上,它的四脚怎样开始一齐跳动。我看见它身上的皮颈套和颈套上的铜环怎样跳动,我一直凝视到马尾附近的皮套布满汗珠为止。我开始四下环顾:观看起伏波动的成熟了的麦田,观看黑黝黝的休耕地,地里有时看得见一架木犁、一个农民和一匹带着马驹的母马;我观看里程标,甚至瞅一眼车夫的驭台,好看看跟我们去的是哪个车夫;我脸上的泪痕还没有干,我的思绪就已经远远地离开我的妈妈,也许我要同她永别了的妈妈。但是,一切回忆都使人想到她。我想起前一天我在白桦林荫路上找到的蘑菇,想起柳博奇卡和卡简卡争吵谁来采它,还想起同我们分别时她们怎样哭泣。

我舍不得离开她们!也舍不得离开娜达丽雅·萨维什娜和那条白桦林荫路,还舍不得离开福加!连那个很凶的米米,我也舍不得离开。我会都舍不得!而可怜的妈妈呢?泪水又涌到我的眼里;但是时间并不长。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 standing 2hCzgo     
n.持续,地位;adj.永久的,不动的,直立的,不流动的
参考例句:
  • After the earthquake only a few houses were left standing.地震过后只有几幢房屋还立着。
  • They're standing out against any change in the law.他们坚决反对对法律做任何修改。
2 hurled 16e3a6ba35b6465e1376a4335ae25cd2     
v.猛投,用力掷( hurl的过去式和过去分词 );大声叫骂
参考例句:
  • He hurled a brick through the window. 他往窗户里扔了块砖。
  • The strong wind hurled down bits of the roof. 大风把屋顶的瓦片刮了下来。 来自《简明英汉词典》
3 perspiration c3UzD     
n.汗水;出汗
参考例句:
  • It is so hot that my clothes are wet with perspiration.天太热了,我的衣服被汗水湿透了。
  • The perspiration was running down my back.汗从我背上淌下来。
4 chattering chattering     
n. (机器振动发出的)咔嗒声,(鸟等)鸣,啁啾 adj. 喋喋不休的,啾啾声的 动词chatter的现在分词形式
参考例句:
  • The teacher told the children to stop chattering in class. 老师叫孩子们在课堂上不要叽叽喳喳讲话。
  • I was so cold that my teeth were chattering. 我冷得牙齿直打战。
5 slung slung     
抛( sling的过去式和过去分词 ); 吊挂; 遣送; 押往
参考例句:
  • He slung the bag over his shoulder. 他把包一甩,挎在肩上。
  • He stood up and slung his gun over his shoulder. 他站起来把枪往肩上一背。
6 reins 370afc7786679703b82ccfca58610c98     
感情,激情; 缰( rein的名词复数 ); 控制手段; 掌管; (成人带着幼儿走路以防其走失时用的)保护带
参考例句:
  • She pulled gently on the reins. 她轻轻地拉着缰绳。
  • The government has imposed strict reins on the import of luxury goods. 政府对奢侈品的进口有严格的控制手段。
7 thonged 89e4c689798987f6f4999a025e266070     
n.皮带;皮条;皮鞭;鞭梢vt.给…装上皮带;鞭打
参考例句:
  • He fastened the dog to the post with a thong. 他用一根皮带把狗拴到柱子上。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • If I switch with Harry, do I have to wear a thong? 如果我和哈里调换,我应该穿皮带吗? 来自电影对白
8 thong xqWyK     
n.皮带;皮鞭;v.装皮带
参考例句:
  • He fastened the dog to the post with a thong.他用一根皮带把狗拴到柱子上。
  • If I switch with Harry,do I have to wear a thong?如果我和哈里调换,我应该穿皮带吗?
9 hues adb36550095392fec301ed06c82f8920     
色彩( hue的名词复数 ); 色调; 信仰; 观点
参考例句:
  • When the sun rose a hundred prismatic hues were reflected from it. 太阳一出,更把它映得千变万化、异彩缤纷。
  • Where maple trees grow, the leaves are often several brilliant hues of red. 在枫树生长的地方,枫叶常常呈现出数种光彩夺目的红色。
10 lashing 97a95b88746153568e8a70177bc9108e     
n.鞭打;痛斥;大量;许多v.鞭打( lash的现在分词 );煽动;紧系;怒斥
参考例句:
  • The speaker was lashing the crowd. 演讲人正在煽动人群。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The rain was lashing the windows. 雨急打着窗子。 来自《简明英汉词典》
11 dozing dozing     
v.打瞌睡,假寐 n.瞌睡
参考例句:
  • The economy shows no signs of faltering. 经济没有衰退的迹象。
  • He never falters in his determination. 他的决心从不动摇。
12 akin uxbz2     
adj.同族的,类似的
参考例句:
  • She painted flowers and birds pictures akin to those of earlier feminine painters.她画一些同早期女画家类似的花鸟画。
  • Listening to his life story is akin to reading a good adventure novel.听他的人生故事犹如阅读一本精彩的冒险小说。
13 impending 3qHzdb     
a.imminent, about to come or happen
参考例句:
  • Against a background of impending famine, heavy fighting took place. 即将发生饥荒之时,严重的战乱爆发了。
  • The king convoke parliament to cope with the impending danger. 国王召开国会以应付迫近眉睫的危险。
14 muffled fnmzel     
adj.(声音)被隔的;听不太清的;(衣服)裹严的;蒙住的v.压抑,捂住( muffle的过去式和过去分词 );用厚厚的衣帽包着(自己)
参考例句:
  • muffled voices from the next room 从隔壁房间里传来的沉闷声音
  • There was a muffled explosion somewhere on their right. 在他们的右面什么地方有一声沉闷的爆炸声。 来自《简明英汉词典》
15 linen W3LyK     
n.亚麻布,亚麻线,亚麻制品;adj.亚麻布制的,亚麻的
参考例句:
  • The worker is starching the linen.这名工人正在给亚麻布上浆。
  • Fine linen and cotton fabrics were known as well as wool.精细的亚麻织品和棉织品像羊毛一样闻名遐迩。
16 prick QQyxb     
v.刺伤,刺痛,刺孔;n.刺伤,刺痛
参考例句:
  • He felt a sharp prick when he stepped on an upturned nail.当他踩在一个尖朝上的钉子上时,他感到剧烈的疼痛。
  • He burst the balloon with a prick of the pin.他用针一戳,气球就爆了。
17 impatience OaOxC     
n.不耐烦,急躁
参考例句:
  • He expressed impatience at the slow rate of progress.进展缓慢,他显得不耐烦。
  • He gave a stamp of impatience.他不耐烦地跺脚。
18 forth Hzdz2     
adv.向前;向外,往外
参考例句:
  • The wind moved the trees gently back and forth.风吹得树轻轻地来回摇晃。
  • He gave forth a series of works in rapid succession.他很快连续发表了一系列的作品。
19 luncheon V8az4     
n.午宴,午餐,便宴
参考例句:
  • We have luncheon at twelve o'clock.我们十二点钟用午餐。
  • I have a luncheon engagement.我午饭有约。
20 concealed 0v3zxG     
a.隐藏的,隐蔽的
参考例句:
  • The paintings were concealed beneath a thick layer of plaster. 那些画被隐藏在厚厚的灰泥层下面。
  • I think he had a gun concealed about his person. 我认为他当时身上藏有一支枪。
21 bent QQ8yD     
n.爱好,癖好;adj.弯的;决心的,一心的
参考例句:
  • He was fully bent upon the project.他一心扑在这项计划上。
  • We bent over backward to help them.我们尽了最大努力帮助他们。
22 preoccupied TPBxZ     
adj.全神贯注的,入神的;被抢先占有的;心事重重的v.占据(某人)思想,使对…全神贯注,使专心于( preoccupy的过去式)
参考例句:
  • He was too preoccupied with his own thoughts to notice anything wrong. 他只顾想着心事,没注意到有什么不对。
  • The question of going to the Mount Tai preoccupied his mind. 去游泰山的问题盘踞在他心头。 来自《简明英汉词典》
23 faltering b25bbdc0788288f819b6e8b06c0a6496     
犹豫的,支吾的,蹒跚的
参考例句:
  • The economy shows no signs of faltering. 经济没有衰退的迹象。
  • I canfeel my legs faltering. 我感到我的腿在颤抖。
24 miserable g18yk     
adj.悲惨的,痛苦的;可怜的,糟糕的
参考例句:
  • It was miserable of you to make fun of him.你取笑他,这是可耻的。
  • Her past life was miserable.她过去的生活很苦。
25 resounding zkCzZC     
adj. 响亮的
参考例句:
  • The astronaut was welcomed with joyous,resounding acclaim. 人们欢声雷动地迎接那位宇航员。
  • He hit the water with a resounding slap. 他啪的一声拍了一下水。
26 salute rYzx4     
vi.行礼,致意,问候,放礼炮;vt.向…致意,迎接,赞扬;n.招呼,敬礼,礼炮
参考例句:
  • Merchant ships salute each other by dipping the flag.商船互相点旗致敬。
  • The Japanese women salute the people with formal bows in welcome.这些日本妇女以正式的鞠躬向人们施礼以示欢迎。
27 greasy a64yV     
adj. 多脂的,油脂的
参考例句:
  • He bought a heavy-duty cleanser to clean his greasy oven.昨天他买了强力清洁剂来清洗油污的炉子。
  • You loathe the smell of greasy food when you are seasick.当你晕船时,你会厌恶油腻的气味。
28 tiresome Kgty9     
adj.令人疲劳的,令人厌倦的
参考例句:
  • His doubts and hesitations were tiresome.他的疑惑和犹豫令人厌烦。
  • He was tiresome in contending for the value of his own labors.他老为他自己劳动的价值而争强斗胜,令人生厌。
29 bestow 9t3zo     
v.把…赠与,把…授予;花费
参考例句:
  • He wished to bestow great honors upon the hero.他希望将那些伟大的荣誉授予这位英雄。
  • What great inspiration wiII you bestow on me?你有什么伟大的灵感能馈赠给我?
30 entirely entirely     
ad.全部地,完整地;完全地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The fire was entirely caused by their neglect of duty. 那场火灾完全是由于他们失职而引起的。
  • His life was entirely given up to the educational work. 他的一生统统献给了教育工作。
31 mutual eFOxC     
adj.相互的,彼此的;共同的,共有的
参考例句:
  • We must pull together for mutual interest.我们必须为相互的利益而通力合作。
  • Mutual interests tied us together.相互的利害关系把我们联系在一起。
32 determined duszmP     
adj.坚定的;有决心的
参考例句:
  • I have determined on going to Tibet after graduation.我已决定毕业后去西藏。
  • He determined to view the rooms behind the office.他决定查看一下办公室后面的房间。
33 soothe qwKwF     
v.安慰;使平静;使减轻;缓和;奉承
参考例句:
  • I've managed to soothe him down a bit.我想方设法使他平静了一点。
  • This medicine should soothe your sore throat.这种药会减轻你的喉痛。
34 trotting cbfe4f2086fbf0d567ffdf135320f26a     
小跑,急走( trot的现在分词 ); 匆匆忙忙地走
参考例句:
  • The riders came trotting down the lane. 这骑手骑着马在小路上慢跑。
  • Alan took the reins and the small horse started trotting. 艾伦抓住缰绳,小马开始慢跑起来。
35 hoof 55JyP     
n.(马,牛等的)蹄
参考例句:
  • Suddenly he heard the quick,short click of a horse's hoof behind him.突然间,他听见背后响起一阵急骤的马蹄的得得声。
  • I was kicked by a hoof.我被一只蹄子踢到了。
36 foam LjOxI     
v./n.泡沫,起泡沫
参考例句:
  • The glass of beer was mostly foam.这杯啤酒大部分是泡沫。
  • The surface of the water is full of foam.水面都是泡沫。
37 horrid arozZj     
adj.可怕的;令人惊恐的;恐怖的;极讨厌的
参考例句:
  • I'm not going to the horrid dinner party.我不打算去参加这次讨厌的宴会。
  • The medicine is horrid and she couldn't get it down.这种药很难吃,她咽不下去。


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