小说搜索     点击排行榜   最新入库
首页 » 双语小说 » 神秘岛 The Mysterious Island » Book 1 Chapter 6
选择底色: 选择字号:【大】【中】【小】
Book 1 Chapter 6

The inventory of the articles possessed by these castaways from the clouds, thrown upon a coast which appeared to be uninhabited, was soon made out. They had nothing, save the clothes which they were wearing at the time of the catastrophe. We must mention, however, a note-book and a watch which Gideon Spilett had kept, doubtless by inadvertence, not a weapon, not a tool, not even a pocket-knife; for while in the car they had thrown out everything to lighten the balloon. The imaginary heroes of Daniel Defoe or of Wyss, as well as Selkirk and Raynal shipwrecked on Juan Fernandez and on the archipelago of the Aucklands, were never in such absolute destitution. Either they had abundant resources from their stranded vessels, in grain, cattle, tools, ammunition, or else some things were thrown up on the coast which supplied them with all the first necessities of life. But here, not any instrument whatever, not a utensil. From nothing they must supply themselves with everything.

And yet, if Cyrus Harding had been with them, if the engineer could have brought his practical science, his inventive mind to bear on their situation, perhaps all hope would not have been lost. Alas! they must hope no longer again to see Cyrus Harding. The castaways could expect nothing but from themselves and from that Providence which never abandons those whose faith is sincere.

But ought they to establish themselves on this part of the coast, without trying to know to what continent it belonged, if it was inhabited, or if they were on the shore of a desert island?

It was an important question, and should be solved with the shortest possible delay. From its answer they would know what measures to take. However, according to Pencroft's advice, it appeared best to wait a few days before commencing an exploration. They must, in fact, prepare some provisions and procure more strengthening food than eggs and molluscs. The explorers, before undertaking new fatigues, must first of all recruit their strength.

The Chimneys offered a retreat sufficient for the present. The fire was lighted, and it was easy to preserve some embers. There were plenty of shell-fish and eggs among the rocks and on the beach. It would be easy to kill a few of the pigeons which were flying by hundreds about the summit of the plateau, either with sticks or stones. Perhaps the trees of the neighboring forest would supply them with eatable fruit. Lastly, the sweet water was there.

It was accordingly settled that for a few days they would remain at the Chimneys so as to prepare themselves for an expedition, either along the shore or into the interior of the country. This plan suited Neb particularly. As obstinate in his ideas as in his presentiments, he was in no haste to abandon this part of the coast, the scene of the catastrophe. He did not, he would not believe in the loss of Cyrus Harding. No, it did not seem to him possible that such a man had ended in this vulgar fashion, carried away by a wave, drowned in the floods, a few hundred feet from a shore. As long as the waves had not cast up the body of the engineer, as long as he, Neb, had not seen with his eyes, touched with his hands the corpse of his master, he would not believe in his death! And this idea rooted itself deeper than ever in his determined heart. An illusion perhaps, but still an illusion to be respected, and one which the sailor did not wish to destroy. As for him, he hoped no longer, but there was no use in arguing with Neb. He was like the dog who will not leave the place where his master is buried, and his grief was such that most probably he would not survive him.

This same morning, the 26th of March, at daybreak, Neb had set out on the shore in a northerly direction, and he had returned to the spot where the sea, no doubt, had closed over the unfortunate Harding.

That day's breakfast was composed solely of pigeon's eggs and lithodomes. Herbert had found some salt deposited by evaporation in the hollows of the rocks, and this mineral was very welcome.

The repast ended, Pencroft asked the reporter if he wished to accompany Herbert and himself to the forest, where they were going to try to hunt. But on consideration, it was thought necessary that someone should remain to keep in the fire, and to be at hand in the highly improbable event of Neb requiring aid. The reporter accordingly remained behind.

"To the chase, Herbert," said the sailor. "We shall find ammunition on our way, and cut our weapons in the forest." But at the moment of starting, Herbert observed, that since they had no tinder, it would perhaps be prudent to replace it by another substance.

"What?" asked Pencroft.

"Burnt linen," replied the boy. "That could in case of need serve for tinder."

The sailor thought it very sensible advice. Only it had the inconvenience of necessitating the sacrifice of a piece of handkerchief. Notwithstanding, the thing was well worth while trying, and a part of Pencroft's large checked handkerchief was soon reduced to the state of a half-burnt rag. This inflammable material was placed in the central chamber at the bottom of a little cavity in the rock, sheltered from all wind and damp.

It was nine o'clock in the morning. The weather was threatening and the breeze blew from the southeast. Herbert and Pencroft turned the angle of the Chimneys, not without having cast a look at the smoke which, just at that place, curled round a point of rock: they ascended the left bank of the river.

Arrived at the forest, Pencroft broke from the first tree two stout branches which he transformed into clubs, the ends of which Herbert rubbed smooth on a rock. Oh! what would they not have given for a knife!

The two hunters now advanced among the long grass, following the bank. From the turning which directed its course to the southwest, the river narrowed gradually and the channel lay between high banks, over which the trees formed a double arch. Pencroft, lest they should lose themselves, resolved to follow the course of the stream, which would always lead them back to the point from which they started. But the bank was not without some obstacles: here, the flexible branches of the trees bent level with the current; there, creepers and thorns which they had to break down with their sticks. Herbert often glided among the broken stumps with the agility of a young cat, and disappeared in the underwood. But Pencroft called him back directly, begging him not to wander away. Meanwhile, the sailor attentively observed the disposition and nature of the surrounding country. On the left bank, the ground, which was flat and marshy, rose imperceptibly towards the interior. It looked there like a network of liquid threads which doubtless reached the river by some underground drain. Sometimes a stream ran through the underwood, which they crossed without difficulty. The opposite shore appeared to be more uneven, and the valley of which the river occupied the bottom was more clearly visible. The hill, covered with trees disposed in terraces, intercepted the view. On the right bank walking would have been difficult, for the declivities fell suddenly, and the trees bending over the water were only sustained by the strength of their roots.

It is needless to add that this forest, as well as the coast already surveyed, was destitute of any sign of human life. Pencroft only saw traces of quadrupeds, fresh footprints of animals, of which he could not recognize the species. In all probability, and such was also Herbert's opinion, some had been left by formidable wild beasts which doubtless would give them some trouble; but nowhere did they observe the mark of an axe on the trees, nor the ashes of a fire, nor the impression of a human foot. On this they might probably congratulate themselves, for on any land in the middle of the Pacific the presence of man was perhaps more to be feared than desired. Herbert and Pencroft speaking little, for the difficulties of the way were great, advanced very slowly, and after walking for an hour they had scarcely gone more than a mile. As yet the hunt had not been successful. However, some birds sang and fluttered in the foliage, and appeared very timid, as if man had inspired them with an instinctive fear. Among others, Herbert described, in a marshy part of the forest, a bird with a long pointed beak, closely resembling the king-fisher, but its plumage was not fine, though of a metallic brilliancy.

"That must be a jacamar," said Herbert, trying to get nearer.

"This will be a good opportunity to taste jacamar," replied the sailor, "if that fellow is in a humor to be roasted!"

Just then, a stone cleverly thrown by the boy, struck the creature on the wing, but the blow did not disable it, and the jacamar ran off and disappeared in an instant.

"How clumsy I am!" cried Herbert.

"No, no, my boy!" replied the sailor. "The blow was well aimed; many a one would have missed it altogether! Come, don't be vexed with yourself. We shall catch it another day!"

As the hunters advanced, the trees were found to be more scattered, many being magnificent, but none bore eatable fruit. Pencroft searched in vain for some of those precious palm-trees which are employed in so many ways in domestic life, and which have been found as far as the fortieth parallel in the Northern Hemisphere, and to the thirty-fifth only in the Southern Hemisphere. But this forest was only composed of coniferae, such as deodaras, already recognized by Herbert, and Douglas pine, similar to those which grow on the northwest coast of America, and splendid firs, measuring a hundred and fifty feet in height.

At this moment a flock of birds, of a small size and pretty plumage, with long glancing tails, dispersed themselves among the branches strewing their feathers, which covered the ground as with fine down. Herbert picked up a few of these feathers, and after having examined them,--

"These are couroucous," said he.

"I should prefer a moor-cock or guinea-fowl," replied Pencroft, "still, if they are good to eat--"

"They are good to eat, and also their flesh is very delicate," replied Herbert. "Besides, if I don't mistake, it is easy to approach and kill them with a stick."

The sailor and the lad, creeping among the grass, arrived at the foot of a tree, whose lower branches were covered with little birds. The couroucous were waiting the passage of insects which served for their nourishment. Their feathery feet could be seen clasping the slender twigs which supported them.

The hunters then rose, and using their sticks like scythes, they mowed down whole rows of these couroucous, who never thought of flying away, and stupidly allowed themselves to be knocked off. A hundred were already heaped on the ground, before the others made up their minds to fly.

"Well," said Pencroft, "here is game, which is quite within the reach of hunters like us. We have only to put out our hands and take it!"

The sailor having strung the couroucous like larks on flexible twigs, they then continued their exploration. The stream here made a bend towards the south, but this detour was probably not prolonged for the river must have its source in the mountain, and be supplied by the melting of the snow which covered the sides of the central cone.

The particular object of their expedition was, as has been said, to procure the greatest possible quantity of game for the inhabitants of the Chimneys. It must be acknowledged that as yet this object had not been attained. So the sailor actively pursued his researches, though he exclaimed, when some animal which he had not even time to recognize fled into the long grass, "If only we had had the dog Top!" But Top had disappeared at the same time as his master, and had probably perished with him.

Towards three o'clock new flocks of birds were seen through certain trees, at whose aromatic berries they were pecking, those of the juniper- tree among others. Suddenly a loud trumpet call resounded through the forest. This strange and sonorous cry was produced by a game bird called grouse in the United States. They soon saw several couples, whose plumage was rich chestnut-brown mottled with dark brown, and tail of the same color. Herbert recognized the males by the two wing-like appendages raised on the neck. Pencroft determined to get hold of at least one of these gallinaceae, which were as large as a fowl, and whose flesh is better than that of a pullet. But it was difficult, for they would not allow themselves to be approached. After several fruitless attempts, which resulted in nothing but scaring the grouse, the sailor said to the lad,--

"Decidedly, since we can't kill them on the wing, we must try to take them with a line."

"Like a fish?" cried Herbert, much surprised at the proposal.

"Like a fish," replied the sailor quite seriously. Pencroft had found among the grass half a dozen grouse nests, each having three or four eggs. He took great care not to touch these nests, to which their proprietors would not fail to return. It was around these that he meant to stretch his lines, not snares, but real fishing-lines. He took Herbert to some distance from the nests, and there prepared his singular apparatus with all the care which a disciple of Izaak Walton would have used. Herbert watched the work with great interest, though rather doubting its success. The lines were made of fine creepers, fastened one to the other, of the length of fifteen or twenty feet. Thick, strong thorns, the points bent back (which were supplied from a dwarf acacia bush) were fastened to the ends of the creepers, by way of hooks. Large red worms, which were crawling on the ground, furnished bait.

This done, Pencroft, passing among the grass and concealing himself skillfully, placed the end of his lines armed with hooks near the grouse nests; then he returned, took the other ends and hid with Herbert behind a large tree. There they both waited patiently; though, it must be said, that Herbert did not reckon much on the success of the inventive Pencroft.

A whole half-hour passed, but then, as the sailor had surmised, several couple of grouse returned to their nests. They walked along, pecking the ground, and not suspecting in any way the presence of the hunters, who, besides, had taken care to place themselves to leeward of the gallinaceae.

The lad felt at this moment highly interested. He held his breath, and Pencroft, his eyes staring, his mouth open, his lips advanced, as if about to taste a piece of grouse, scarcely breathed.

Meanwhile, the birds walked about the hooks, without taking any notice of them. Pencroft then gave little tugs which moved the bait as if the worms had been still alive.

The sailor undoubtedly felt much greater anxiety than does the fisherman, for he does not see his prey coming through the water. The jerks attracted the attention of the gallinaceae, and they attacked the hooks with their beaks. Three voracious grouse swallowed at the same moment bait and hook. Suddenly with a smart jerk, Pencroft "struck" his line, and a flapping of wings showed that the birds were taken.

"Hurrah!" he cried, rushing towards the game, of which he made himself master in an instant.

Herbert clapped his hands. It was the first time that he had ever seen birds taken with a line, but the sailor modestly confessed that it was not his first attempt, and that besides he could not claim the merit of invention.

"And at any rate," added he, "situated as we are, we must hope to hit upon many other contrivances."

The grouse were fastened by their claws, and Pencroft, delighted at not having to appear before their companions with empty hands, and observing that the day had begun to decline, judged it best to return to their dwelling.

The direction was indicated by the river, whose course they had only to follow, and, towards six o'clock, tired enough with their excursion, Herbert and Pencroft arrived at the Chimneys.

遇难的人从云端掉在这片似乎没有人烟的海岸上以后,很快就清点了一下他们的全部物品。这时,除去随身衣服之外,他们什么也没有了。然而必须说明,吉丁·史佩莱还有一个笔记本和一只表,那无疑是因为疏忽才保留下来的。他们没有武器,没有工具,甚至连一把小刀都没有。在吊篮里的时候,为了减轻气球的重量,他们把所有的东西都扔出去了。就连但尼尔·笛福和魏斯的小说中想象的主人公以及在约翰斐南得群岛和奥克兰群岛航海遇难的赛尔寇克和雷纳,也决不象他们这样一无所有。那些人不是在搁浅的船上得到大量的物资——粮食、家畜、工具和弹药,就是在海滨找到生活必需品。但是这里却没有任何工具和家具。他们只好赤手空拳给自己创造一切。

可是,如果赛勒斯·史密斯和他们在一起,如果工程师利用他的实用科学,针对着他们的情况开动脑筋,发挥创造天才,也许还不至于一筹莫展。然而他们今生再也不用想看见赛勒斯·史密斯了!这些遇难的人只能把希望寄托在自己身上,但愿上天不负有心人,此外再没有别的指望了。这一带海岸属于哪个大陆,有没有人,他们所在的地方是不是一个荒岛,他们能不想个法子调查清楚就这样定居下来吗?

这是一个重要的问题,必须毫不延迟地尽快解决,弄清了这个问题以后,他们就可以决定下一步该怎么做了。然而,按照潘克洛夫的意见,最好还是过几天再开始探索。他们必须准备一些干粮,找些比鸽蛋和软体动物更好的食物,在进行新的繁重工作以前,探险的人首先必须恢复体力。

“石窟”暂时还足够用来安身。篝火生起来了,保留一些炭火也很容易。石缝里有的是鸽蛋,海滩上有大量的蛤蜊。高地上有成千成百的野鸽子在盘旋,不论用棍子或石头都很容易打下几只来。邻近的森林里也可能有可以食用的果子。最后的一个有利条件是:附近有淡水。

他们决定在“石窟”里暂住几天,做好准备,然后或是沿着海岸,或是深入内陆去探险。纳布特别同意这个计划。他的思想和预感都坚持不变,他不想离开出事的海岸。他不相信,可以说不愿意相信赛勒斯·史密斯已经死了。不,他认为象史密斯那样的人决不会糊里糊涂地死去,决不能被海浪卷走,在离岸不过几百英尺的海滨淹死。除非海浪把工程师的尸体冲到岸上来,让他亲眼看见、亲手摸到他主人的尸体,要不然他是决不相信他的主人已经死去的!这个念头好象在他心里扎了根,愈来愈坚定了。也许这是一种幻想,但却是值得尊重的幻想,所以水手也不愿意说破。水手自己固然已经不抱什么希望,然而他知道和纳布争辩也没有用。纳布正象一条在主人的坟旁流连不去的狗,他哀恸得几乎活不下去了。

就在同一天,3月26日的清晨,纳布沿着海岸向北走去,他到了出事的海滨,他记得很清楚,不幸的史密斯就是在这个地方失踪的。

那天早上他们吃的完全是鸽蛋和茨蟹。赫伯特在石头凹处找到一些海水蒸发以后留下来的盐,这种矿物来得正是时候。

吃完饭以后,潘克洛夫问通讯记者愿不愿陪他和赫伯特一起到森林里去打猎。考虑的结果,他们认为必须留一个人在洞里照顾篝火,再说,虽然纳布找到史密斯的可能性很小,也需要有一个人在近处准备帮助他。于是通讯记者就留在家里了。

“赫伯特,我们去打猎的时候,要在路上找些猎具,在森林里弄些武器。”水手说。但是临出发的时候,赫伯特却提出另一件事情,他说,既然没有火绒,最好还是找一些代用品。

“找什么呢?”潘克洛夫问道。

“焦布,”孩子回答说,“也许可以拿它当火绒使用。”

水手觉得这个办法很好。不过这样就必须牺牲一块手帕了。然而这还是值得的,于是潘克洛夫就从他那大花格子的手帕上撕下一块来,马上烤成一块半焦的破布。

他们就把这块容易引火的焦布放在石洞中堂的一个小窟窿的深处,免得遭到风吹和受潮。

早上九点钟,天气阴沉沉的,刮着东南风。赫伯特和潘克洛夫绕过“石窟”的拐弯处,不时看看那缕从石尖顶处袅袅上升的轻烟。他们向河的左岸走去。

进了树林,潘克洛夫首先就从一棵树上扳下两大根粗树枝来,做成棍子,赫伯特又在石头上把棍子的两头磨尖。要是能有一把刀子,他们一定会不借任何代价去换取!

这两个猎人沿着河岸在深草里向前走。河身拐了一个弯向西南流去,再往上河床渐渐狭窄了,两岸很高,上面的树枝搭在一起形成一座拱门。为了不致迷失方向,潘克洛夫决定沿河往前走,这样他们随时都能回到原出发点。但是岸上的障碍太多:有些地方柔韧的树枝低拂水面,有些地方他们又必须用棍子在荆棘和爬藤之间开路,赫伯特在树桩间跑来跑去,灵巧得象一只小猫,在矮树丛中一下子就不见了。一遇这类情况潘克洛夫马上就把他叫回来,央告他不要走失。同时水手留神观察着周围的风土和地势。河的左岸平坦而多沼泽,渐渐地向内陆平缓地高升上去。从这里看起来象是一片水网,无疑地,这些水都从地下泉眼直通到河里。有些矮树丛中也有不费事就可以渡过的小溪流。河的对岸更加崎岖不平,河水流过的一条峡谷地带显得分外突出。一座小山,上面长着层层叠叠的树木象一层帘子似的挡住了视线。在河的右岸行走一定很困难,因为这里地势很陡,弯向水面的树木全靠它们的根部牵扯着。

不用说,这片森林和他们已经视察过的海岸一样,都是人迹没有到过的地方。潘克洛夫只发现了兽类的脚印,动物新近遗留下来的脚印,但是他不知道那究竟是些什么动物;赫伯特认为其中有的是凶猛的野兽留下来的,这些野兽当然会给他们带来一些麻烦;然而他们并没有发现树上有斧子砍过的痕迹,也没有篝火的余烬,更没有人类的脚印。这倒是值得他们庆幸的,要知道在太平洋的任何一个岛屿上,都是有人反比没人更可怕。由于走起来困难重重,前进得很慢,赫伯特和潘克洛夫顾不得谈话了。出发一个钟头以后,才勉强走了一英里多路。到目前为止,打猎还没有一点收获。还好,树枝间有小鸟在乱飞乱叫,显得非常胆小,似乎看见了人,才懂得害怕了。在森林的一片沼泽地带,赫伯特看见一种类似鱼狗的鸟,长着又长又尖的嘴,虽然羽毛发出金属般的光泽,但是并不美丽。

“那一定是啄木鸟,”赫伯特一面说,一面打算走近些。

“这一回可有机会尝尝啄木鸟的肉啦,”水手说,“看它是不是愿意让我们烤一烤!”

正在说着话,赫伯特巧妙地抛出一块石头,打着了啄木鸟的翅膀,但是并没有把它打倒,一转眼它就逃得无影无踪了。

“我的手法真太不高明了!”赫伯特喊道。

“不,不,孩子!”水手说,“你扔得很准;别人恐怕连打都打不着呢!来吧,不要泄气。早晚我们能捉住它的!”

猎人们继续往前走,树木愈来愈稀疏了,有很多树看起来很美丽,但结的果子都不能吃。潘克洛夫找来找去也没有找到日常生活中用途很广的棕榈树;这种树在北半球一直到北纬40度还有,但是在南半球却只分布到南纬35度。这片森林里只有松柏科的树木,赫伯特已经认出来的有:喜马拉雅杉,类似北美洲西北部的那种洋松,和高达一百五十英尺的大枞树。

这时忽然飞来一群美丽的小鸟,长着光彩的长尾巴,它们东一个西一个地停在树枝上,身子一抖羽毛就纷纷落下来,地面上好象铺上了一层上等的鸭绒。赫伯特捡起几根羽毛,看了一会儿,然后说:

“这是锦鸡。”

“我还是喜欢松鸡和珍珠鸡,”潘克洛夫说,“可是假如好吃的话……”

“锦鸡很好吃,它们的肉很嫩,”赫伯特回答说。“还有,如果我没有记错,这种鸟不怕人,我们可以走近去用棍子把它们打死。”

水手和少年从草丛里爬到一棵树底下,这棵树靠近地面的树枝上歇满了锦鸡。它们专等着吃爬过的昆虫,因为它们就靠吃小虫过活。这些鸟用它们的毛爪攀着小树枝,停在树上。

猎人们站起身来,他们的棍子象镰刀割草似的把它们一连串地从树上打下来,这些锦鸡一点也不想飞走,呆呆地任凭人们把它们打落在地上。等到剩下的锦鸡要飞走的时候,地面上已经堆了一百只左右了。

“好,”潘克洛夫说,“这种野禽倒很适合我们这种猎户。只要伸手就可以拿到它们!”

水手用柔韧的细枝把它们穿成串,仿佛是一行飞行的云雀。穿好以后,他们继续前进。河流在这里向南转了一个弯,但是这个弯大概不会延长多远,因为河源一定就在前面的深山里,河水是由主峰的积雪融汇而成的。

他们远征的主要目的已经说过了,是要多找一些野味供给“石窟”里的居民吃。必须承认,到现在为止这个目的还没有达到。因此水手积极地继续向前搜索。忽然有一只动物跑到草丛里去了,他没来得及看清是什么东西,不禁喊道:“假如托普在这儿多好啊!”然而托普和它的主人同时失踪,大概他们是死在一处了。

将近三点钟的时候,树林间又飞来了另外一群鸟,它们在林中的杜松上啄食芳香的松子。突然森林里传出喇叭似的一阵长鸣。这种奇怪而响亮的鸣叫是由美国常见的一种带颈羽的松鸡发出来的。他们很快就看到好几对,这些松鸡有着鲜艳的栗色羽毛,中间点缀着深褐色的斑点,尾巴的颜色也是一样。有几只松鸡脖子上有两片象翅膀似的肉瓣,赫怕特认得这是公的。这种鹑鸡类的动物大小跟普通鸡差不多,而肉味却比笋鸡还要鲜美,潘克洛夫打定主意至少要捉一只。然而要想捉到它们却很困难,因为这种松鸡不容易接近。试了几次,一只也没有捉到,只是把它们吓得一阵乱飞。于是水手对赫伯特说:

“既然它们会飞,逮不着它们,我们就只好用绳子来钓了。”

“象钓鱼似的钓松鸡吗?”赫伯特听了这个提议以后,惊讶地喊道。

“是的。”潘克洛夫一本正经地回答说。他已经在草丛里发现了六个松鸡窝,每个窝里有三四个蛋。水手十分小心地不把鸡窝弄坏,他知道松鸡一定会回来的。他就打算在这些窝的旁边布置绳索——不是圈套,而是真正的钓丝。他把赫伯特带到离鸡窝几步远的地方,在那里小心地安排了一套奇特的装置,这只有依萨克·华尔顿的门徒才会使用。赫伯特很感兴趣地看着他工作,但是还不大相信他能成功。钓丝是用细爬藤接起来的,每根长十五到二十英尺,潘克洛夫从一棵矮小的刺槐上把粗大结实的倒刺扳下来,绑在爬藤的一头当作钩子。把在地面上爬动的大红毛虫当做钓饵。

安排完毕,潘克洛夫悄悄地从深草里走过去,把绳子带钩的一端放在鸡窝附近,然后拿着绳子的另一端走回原处,和赫伯特一起藏在一棵大树后面,他们耐心地在那里等待着。必须说明,赫伯特觉得潘克洛夫的这个发明是不见得能够成功的。

整整过了半个钟头,还没有动静,又过了一会,果然不出水手所料,有好几对松鸡回到窝里来了。它们一面走,一面在地上找东西吃,毫不怀疑附近有猎人,原来猎人考虑得周密,躲到下风去了。

这时赫伯特觉得非常有趣,他屏住了气。潘克洛夫瞪着两眼,张着大嘴,撅着嘴唇,好象正要吃松鸡肉似的,几乎连气也不敢出。

这时候,松鸡在钩子附近走来走去,丝毫没有注意地上的钓饵。于是潘克洛夫轻轻地拉了几下绳子,钓饵微微一动,虫子就好象还活着似的。

水手心里显然比钓鱼的人着急得多,因为钓鱼的人看不见水里的鱼。绳子一动,松鸡就被吸引过来了,它们用嘴啄食钩子上的食饵。几乎是同时,有三只贪吃的松鸡,连虫带钩地把食饵吞了下去。潘克洛夫敏捷地把绳子巧妙地一抖,三只松鸡扑着翅膀被钩住了。

“哈哈!”他一面喊,一面向野禽跑去,马上把它们捉住。

赫伯特高兴得直鼓掌,他还是第一次看见用绳子钓鸟,但是水手却很谦虚地说,这在他已经不是创举了,而且发明的荣誉也不属于他。

“不管怎么说,”他补充道,“在目前的情况下,我们必须多找些窍门。”

他们用绳子绑住松鸡的爪子。潘克洛夫很高兴,现在不至于空手回去见他们的伙伴了,加上天色已晚,他认为最好马上就回去。

河流就是他们的方向,他们只要循着河走就行,将近六点钟的时候,赫伯特和潘克洛夫筋疲力尽地回到了“石窟”。



欢迎访问英文小说网http://novel.tingroom.com

©英文小说网 2005-2010

有任何问题,请给我们留言,管理员邮箱:tinglishi@gmail.com  站长QQ :点击发送消息和我们联系56065533