小说搜索     点击排行榜   最新入库
首页 » 双语小说 » 劝导 Persuasion » Chapter 11
选择底色: 选择字号:【大】【中】【小】
Chapter 11

The time now approached for Lady Russell's return: the day was even fixed1; and Anne, being engaged to join her as soon as she was resettled, was looking forward to an early removal to Kellynch, and beginning to think how her own comfort was likely to be affected2 by it.

It would place her in the same village with Captain Wentworth, within half a mile of him; they would have to frequent the same church, and there must be intercourse3 between the two families. This was against her; but on the other hand, he spent so much of his time at Uppercross, that in removing thence she might be considered rather as leaving him behind, than as going towards him; and, upon the whole, she believed she must, on this interesting question, be the gainer, almost as certainly as in her change of domestic society, in leaving poor Mary for Lady Russell.

She wished it might be possible for her to avoid ever seeing Captain Wentworth at the Hall: those rooms had witnessed former meetings which would be brought too painfully before her; but she was yet more anxious for the possibility of Lady Russell and Captain Wentworth never meeting anywhere. They did not like each other, and no renewal4 of acquaintance now could do any good; and were Lady Russell to see them together, she might think that he had too much self-possession, and she too little.

These points formed her chief solicitude5 in anticipating her removal from Uppercross, where she felt she had been stationed quite long enough. Her usefulness to little Charles would always give some sweetness to the memory of her two months' visit there, but he was gaining strength apace, and she had nothing else to stay for.

The conclusion of her visit, however, was diversified6 in a way which she had not at all imagined. Captain Wentworth, after being unseen and unheard of at Uppercross for two whole days, appeared again among them to justify7 himself by a relation of what had kept him away.

A letter from his friend, Captain Harville, having found him out at last, had brought intelligence of Captain Harville's being settled with his family at Lyme for the winter; of their being therefore, quite unknowingly, within twenty miles of each other. Captain Harville had never been in good health since a severe wound which he received two years before, and Captain Wentworth's anxiety to see him had determined8 him to go immediately to Lyme. He had been there for four-and-twenty hours. His acquittal was complete, his friendship warmly honoured, a lively interest excited for his friend, and his description of the fine country about Lyme so feelingly attended to by the party, that an earnest desire to see Lyme themselves, and a project for going thither10 was the consequence.

The young people were all wild to see Lyme. Captain Wentworth talked of going there again himself, it was only seventeen miles from Uppercross; though November, the weather was by no means bad; and, in short, Louisa, who was the most eager of the eager, having formed the resolution to go, and besides the pleasure of doing as she liked, being now armed with the idea of merit in maintaining her own way, bore down all the wishes of her father and mother for putting it off till summer; and to Lyme they were to go--Charles, Mary, Anne, Henrietta, Louisa, and Captain Wentworth.

The first heedless scheme had been to go in the morning and return at night; but to this Mr Musgrove, for the sake of his horses, would not consent; and when it came to be rationally considered, a day in the middle of November would not leave much time for seeing a new place, after deducting11 seven hours, as the nature of the country required, for going and returning. They were, consequently, to stay the night there, and not to be expected back till the next day's dinner. This was felt to be a considerable amendment12; and though they all met at the Great House at rather an early breakfast hour, and set off very punctually, it was so much past noon before the two carriages, Mr Musgrove's coach containing the four ladies, and Charles's curricle, in which he drove Captain Wentworth, were descending13 the long hill into Lyme, and entering upon the still steeper street of the town itself, that it was very evident they would not have more than time for looking about them, before the light and warmth of the day were gone.

After securing accommodations, and ordering a dinner at one of the inns, the next thing to be done was unquestionably to walk directly down to the sea. They were come too late in the year for any amusement or variety which Lyme, as a public place, might offer. The rooms were shut up, the lodgers14 almost all gone, scarcely any family but of the residents left; and, as there is nothing to admire in the buildings themselves, the remarkable15 situation of the town, the principal street almost hurrying into the water, the walk to the Cobb, skirting round the pleasant little bay, which, in the season, is animated16 with bathing machines and company; the Cobb itself, its old wonders and new improvements, with the very beautiful line of cliffs stretching out to the east of the town, are what the stranger's eye will seek; and a very strange stranger it must be, who does not see charms in the immediate9 environs of Lyme, to make him wish to know it better. The scenes in its neighbourhood, Charmouth, with its high grounds and extensive sweeps of country, and still more, its sweet, retired17 bay, backed by dark cliffs, where fragments of low rock among the sands, make it the happiest spot for watching the flow of the tide, for sitting in unwearied contemplation; the woody varieties of the cheerful village of Up Lyme; and, above all, Pinny, with its green chasms18 between romantic rocks, where the scattered19 forest trees and orchards20 of luxuriant growth, declare that many a generation must have passed away since the first partial falling of the cliff prepared the ground for such a state, where a scene so wonderful and so lovely is exhibited, as may more than equal any of the resembling scenes of the far-famed Isle21 of Wight: these places must be visited, and visited again, to make the worth of Lyme understood.

The party from Uppercross passing down by the now deserted22 and melancholy23 looking rooms, and still descending, soon found themselves on the sea-shore; and lingering only, as all must linger and gaze on a first return to the sea, who ever deserved to look on it at all, proceeded towards the Cobb, equally their object in itself and on Captain Wentworth's account: for in a small house, near the foot of an old pier24 of unknown date, were the Harvilles settled. Captain Wentworth turned in to call on his friend; the others walked on, and he was to join them on the Cobb.

They were by no means tired of wondering and admiring; and not even Louisa seemed to feel that they had parted with Captain Wentworth long, when they saw him coming after them, with three companions, all well known already, by description, to be Captain and Mrs Harville, and a Captain Benwick, who was staying with them.

Captain Benwick had some time ago been first lieutenant25 of the Laconia; and the account which Captain Wentworth had given of him, on his return from Lyme before, his warm praise of him as an excellent young man and an officer, whom he had always valued highly, which must have stamped him well in the esteem26 of every listener, had been followed by a little history of his private life, which rendered him perfectly27 interesting in the eyes of all the ladies. He had been engaged to Captain Harville's sister, and was now mourning her loss. They had been a year or two waiting for fortune and promotion28. Fortune came, his prize-money as lieutenant being great; promotion, too, came at last; but Fanny Harville did not live to know it. She had died the preceding summer while he was at sea. Captain Wentworth believed it impossible for man to be more attached to woman than poor Benwick had been to Fanny Harville, or to be more deeply afflicted29 under the dreadful change. He considered his disposition30 as of the sort which must suffer heavily, uniting very strong feelings with quiet, serious, and retiring manners, and a decided31 taste for reading, and sedentary pursuits. To finish the interest of the story, the friendship between him and the Harvilles seemed, if possible, augmented32 by the event which closed all their views of alliance, and Captain Benwick was now living with them entirely33. Captain Harville had taken his present house for half a year; his taste, and his health, and his fortune, all directing him to a residence inexpensive, and by the sea; and the grandeur34 of the country, and the retirement35 of Lyme in the winter, appeared exactly adapted to Captain Benwick's state of mind. The sympathy and good-will excited towards Captain Benwick was very great.

"And yet, " said Anne to herself, as they now moved forward to meet the party, "he has not, perhaps, a more sorrowing heart than I have. I cannot believe his prospects36 so blighted37 for ever. He is younger than I am; younger in feeling, if not in fact; younger as a man. He will rally again, and be happy with another. "

They all met, and were introduced. Captain Harville was a tall, dark man, with a sensible, benevolent38 countenance39; a little lame40; and from strong features and want of health, looking much older than Captain Wentworth. Captain Benwick looked, and was, the youngest of the three, and, compared with either of them, a little man. He had a pleasing face and a melancholy air, just as he ought to have, and drew back from conversation.

Captain Harville, though not equalling Captain Wentworth in manners, was a perfect gentleman, unaffected, warm, and obliging. Mrs Harville, a degree less polished than her husband, seemed, however, to have the same good feelings; and nothing could be more pleasant than their desire of considering the whole party as friends of their own, because the friends of Captain Wentworth, or more kindly41 hospitable42 than their entreaties43 for their all promising44 to dine with them. The dinner, already ordered at the inn, was at last, though unwillingly45, accepted as a excuse; but they seemed almost hurt that Captain Wentworth should have brought any such party to Lyme, without considering it as a thing of course that they should dine with them.

There was so much attachment46 to Captain Wentworth in all this, and such a bewitching charm in a degree of hospitality so uncommon47, so unlike the usual style of give-and-take invitations, and dinners of formality and display, that Anne felt her spirits not likely to be benefited by an increasing acquaintance among his brother-officers. "These would have been all my friends, " was her thought; and she had to struggle against a great tendency to lowness.

On quitting the Cobb, they all went in-doors with their new friends, and found rooms so small as none but those who invite from the heart could think capable of accommodating so many. Anne had a moment's astonishment48 on the subject herself; but it was soon lost in the pleasanter feelings which sprang from the sight of all the ingenious contrivances and nice arrangements of Captain Harville, to turn the actual space to the best account, to supply the deficiencies of lodging-house furniture, and defend the windows and doors against the winter storms to be expected. The varieties in the fitting-up of the rooms, where the common necessaries provided by the owner, in the common indifferent plight49, were contrasted with some few articles of a rare species of wood, excellently worked up, and with something curious and valuable from all the distant countries Captain Harville had visited, were more than amusing to Anne; connected as it all was with his profession, the fruit of its labours, the effect of its influence on his habits, the picture of repose50 and domestic happiness it presented, made it to her a something more, or less, than gratification.

Captain Harville was no reader; but he had contrived51 excellent accommodations, and fashioned very pretty shelves, for a tolerable collection of well-bound volumes, the property of Captain Benwick. His lameness52 prevented him from taking much exercise; but a mind of usefulness and ingenuity53 seemed to furnish him with constant employment within. He drew, he varnished54, he carpentered, he glued; he made toys for the children; he fashioned new netting-needles and pins with improvements; and if everything else was done, sat down to his large fishing-net at one corner of the room.

Anne thought she left great happiness behind her when they quitted the house; and Louisa, by whom she found herself walking, burst forth55 into raptures56 of admiration57 and delight on the character of the navy; their friendliness58, their brotherliness, their openness, their uprightness; protesting that she was convinced of sailors having more worth and warmth than any other set of men in England; that they only knew how to live, and they only deserved to be respected and loved.

They went back to dress and dine; and so well had the scheme answered already, that nothing was found amiss; though its being "so entirely out of season, " and the "no thoroughfare of Lyme, " and the "no expectation of company, " had brought many apologies from the heads of the inn.

Anne found herself by this time growing so much more hardened to being in Captain Wentworth's company than she had at first imagined could ever be, that the sitting down to the same table with him now, and the interchange of the common civilities attending on it (they never got beyond), was become a mere59 nothing.

The nights were too dark for the ladies to meet again till the morrow, but Captain Harville had promised them a visit in the evening; and he came, bringing his friend also, which was more than had been expected, it having been agreed that Captain Benwick had all the appearance of being oppressed by the presence of so many strangers. He ventured among them again, however, though his spirits certainly did not seem fit for the mirth of the party in general.

While Captains Wentworth and Harville led the talk on one side of the room, and by recurring60 to former days, supplied anecdotes61 in abundance to occupy and entertain the others, it fell to Anne's lot to be placed rather apart with Captain Benwick; and a very good impulse of her nature obliged her to begin an acquaintance with him. He was shy, and disposed to abstraction; but the engaging mildness of her countenance, and gentleness of her manners, soon had their effect; and Anne was well repaid the first trouble of exertion62. He was evidently a young man of considerable taste in reading, though principally in poetry; and besides the persuasion63 of having given him at least an evening's indulgence in the discussion of subjects, which his usual companions had probably no concern in, she had the hope of being of real use to him in some suggestions as to the duty and benefit of struggling against affliction, which had naturally grown out of their conversation. For, though shy, he did not seem reserved; it had rather the appearance of feelings glad to burst their usual restraints; and having talked of poetry, the richness of the present age, and gone through a brief comparison of opinion as to the first-rate poets, trying to ascertain64 whether Marmion or The Lady of the Lake were to be preferred, and how ranked the Giaour and The Bride of Abydos; and moreover, how the Giaour was to be pronounced, he showed himself so intimately acquainted with all the tenderest songs of the one poet, and all the impassioned descriptions of hopeless agony of the other; he repeated, with such tremulous feeling, the various lines which imaged a broken heart, or a mind destroyed by wretchedness, and looked so entirely as if he meant to be understood, that she ventured to hope he did not always read only poetry, and to say, that she thought it was the misfortune of poetry to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly.

His looks shewing him not pained, but pleased with this allusion65 to his situation, she was emboldened66 to go on; and feeling in herself the right of seniority of mind, she ventured to recommend a larger allowance of prose in his daily study; and on being requested to particularize, mentioned such works of our best moralists, such collections of the finest letters, such memoirs67 of characters of worth and suffering, as occurred to her at the moment as calculated to rouse and fortify68 the mind by the highest precepts69, and the strongest examples of moral and religious endurances.

Captain Benwick listened attentively70, and seemed grateful for the interest implied; and though with a shake of the head, and sighs which declared his little faith in the efficacy of any books on grief like his, noted71 down the names of those she recommended, and promised to procure72 and read them.

When the evening was over, Anne could not but be amused at the idea of her coming to Lyme to preach patience and resignation to a young man whom she had never seen before; nor could she help fearing, on more serious reflection, that, like many other great moralists and preachers, she had been eloquent73 on a point in which her own conduct would ill bear examination.

现在,拉塞尔夫人回来的日子临近了,连日期都确定了。安妮与她事先约定,等她一安顿下来,就同她住在一起,因此她期望着早日搬到凯林奇,并且开始捉摸,这会给她自己的安适带来多大的影响。

这样一来,她将和温特沃思上校住在同一个庄上,离他不过半英里地。他们将要时常出入同一座教堂,两家人也少不了你来我往。这是违背她的意愿的;不过话又说回来,他常常呆在厄泼克劳斯,她要是搬到凯林奇,人们会认为她是疏远他,而不是亲近他。总而言之,她相信,考虑到这个有趣的问题,她离开玛丽去找拉塞尔夫人,对她肯定会有好处,简直就像她改变家庭环境那样有好处。

她希望,她能够避免在凯林奇大厦见到温特沃思上校,因为他们以前在那些房间里相会过,再在那里见面会给她带来极大的痛苦。不过,她更加急切地希望,拉塞尔夫人和温特沃思上校无论在哪儿也不要再见面。他们谁也不喜欢谁,现在再言归于好不会带来任何好处。况且,倘若拉塞尔夫人看见他们两人呆在一起,她或许会认为他过于冷静,而她却太不冷静。

她觉得她在厄泼克劳斯逗留得够久的了,现在期待着要离开那里,这些问题又构成了她的主要忧虑。她对小查尔斯的照料,将永远为她这两个月的访问留下美好的记忆,不过孩子正在逐渐恢复健康,她没有别的情由再呆下去。

然而,就在她的访问行将结束的时候,不想节外生枝,发生了一件她完全意想不到的事情。且说人们在厄泼克劳斯已经整整两天没有看见温特沃思上校的人影,也没听到他的消息,如今他又出现在他们之中,说明了他这两天没有来的缘由。

原来,他的朋友哈维尔上校给他写来一封信,好不容易才转到他的手里,告诉他哈维尔上校一家搬到了莱姆(多塞特郡的海滨城市),准备在那儿过冬。因此,他们之间相距不到二十英里,这是他们事先谁也不知道的。哈维尔上校两年前受过重伤,后来身体一直不好。温特沃思上校急切地想见到他,于是便决定立即去莱姆走一趟。他在那里逗留了二十四小时,圆满地履行了自己的职责,受到了热情的款待。同时他的叙述也激起了听话人对他的朋友的浓厚兴趣。他描绘起莱姆一带的秀丽景色时,他们一个个听得津津有味,殷切地渴望亲自看看莱姆,因此便订出了去那里参观的计划。

年轻人都迫不及待地想看看莱姆。温特沃思上校说他自己也想再去一趟,那儿离厄泼克劳斯只有十七英里远。眼下虽说已是十一月②,天气倒并不坏。总而言之,路易莎是急切中最急切的,下定决心非去不可,她除了喜欢我行我素之外,现在又多了一层念头,觉得人贵在自行其是,当父母亲一再希望她推迟到夏天再说时,都给她顶了回去。于是,大伙定好了要去莱姆——查尔斯,玛丽,安妮,亨丽埃塔,路易莎,以及温特沃思上校。

他们起初考虑不周,计划早晨出发,晚上回来。谁想默斯格罗夫先生舍不得自己的马,不同意这种安排。后来经过合情合理地考虑,觉得眼下已是十一月中旬,再加上乡下的路不好走,来回便要七个小时,一天去掉七个小时,就没有多少时间游览一个陌生地方啦。因此,他们决定还是在那里过一夜,到第二天吃晚饭时再回来。大伙觉得这是个不错的修正方案。尽管他们一大早就聚集到大宅,

吃过早饭,准时地起程了,但是直到午后许久,才见到两辆马车(默斯格罗夫先生的马车载着四位夫人小姐,查尔斯赶着他的轻便两轮马车拉着温特沃思上校),一溜下坡地驶进了莱姆,然后驶进该镇更加陡斜的街道。显而易见,他们只不过有时间往四周看看,天色便暗了下来,同时也带来了凉意。

他们在一家旅馆订好了房间和晚餐,下一件事无疑是直奔海滨。他们来的时令太晚了,莱姆作为一个旅游胜地可能提供的种种娱乐,他们一概没有赶上。只见个个房间都关着门,房客差不多走光了,整家整户的,除了当地的居民,简直没有剩下什么人。且说那些楼房本身,城市的奇特位置,几乎笔直通到海滨的主大街以及通往码头的小路,这些都没有什么好称道的,尽管那条小路环绕着可爱的小海湾,而在旅游旺季,小海湾上到处都是更衣车和沐浴的人群。异乡人真正想观赏的还是那个码头本身,它的古迹奇观和新式修缮,以及那陡峭无比的悬崖峭壁,一直延伸到城市的东面。谁要是见不到莱姆近郊的妩媚多姿,不想进一步了解它,那他一定是个不可思议的异乡人。莱姆附近的查茅斯,地高域广,景致宜人,而且它还有个幽美的海湾,背后耸立着黑魁魅的绝壁,有些低矮的石块就星散在沙滩上,构成了人们坐在上面观潮和冥思遐想的绝妙地点。上莱姆是个生机盎然的村庄,长满了各式各样的树木。尤其是平尼,那富有浪漫色彩的悬崖之间夹着一条条翠谷,翠谷中到处长满了茂盛的林木和果树,表明自从这悬崖第一次部分塌陷,为这翠谷奠定基础以来,人类一定度过了许许多多个世代,而这翠谷如今呈现出的如此美妙的景色,完全可以同驰名遐迩的怀特岛的类似景致相媲美。以上这些地方必须经过反复观赏,你才能充分领略莱姆的奥妙。

厄泼克劳斯的那伙游客经过一座座空空荡荡、死气沉沉的公寓,继续往下走去,不久便来到了海边。但凡有幸观海的人初次来到海边,总要逗留、眺望一番,这几位也只是逗留了一阵,接着继续朝码头走去,这既是他们的参观目标,也是为了照顾温特沃思上校,因为在一条不明年代的旧码头附近有一幢小房子,哈维尔一家就住在那里。温特沃思上校进去拜访自己的朋友,其他人则继续往前走,然后他到码头上找他们。

他们一个个兴致勃勃,惊叹不已。当大家看见温特沃思上校赶到时,就连路易莎也不觉得同他离别了很久。温特沃思上校带来了三个伙伴,因为听他介绍过,所以大家都很熟悉这三个人,他们是哈维尔上校夫妇以及同他们住在一起的本威克中校。

本威克中校以前曾在“拉科尼亚号”上当过上尉。温特沃思上校上次从莱姆回来后谈起过他,热烈地称赞说:他是个杰出的青年,是他一向十分器重的一名军官,他这话一定会使每个听话人对本威克中校深为尊敬。随后,他又介绍了一点有关他个人生活的历史,使所有的夫人小姐都感到趣味盎然。原来,他同哈维尔上校的妹妹订过婚,现在正在哀悼她的去世。他们有那么一两年,一直在等待他发财和晋级。钱等到了,他作为上尉得到了很高的赏金。晋级最后也等到了,可惜范妮·哈维尔没有活着听到这一消息。今年夏天,本威克出海的时候,她去世了。温特沃思上校相信,对男人来说,谁也不可能像可怜的本威克爱恋范妮·哈维尔那样爱恋女人,谁也不可能在遇到这可怕变故的情况下像他那样柔肠寸断。温特沃思上校认为,他天生就具有那种忍受痛苦的性格,因为他把强烈的感情同恬静、庄重、矜持的举止融合在一起,而且显然喜欢读书和案犊生活。更有趣的是,他同哈维尔夫妇的友谊,似乎是在发生了这起事件、他们的联姻希望破灭之后,得到进一步增强的,如今他完全同他们生活在一起了。哈维尔上校租下现在这幢房子,打算居住半年。他的嗜好、身体和钱财都要求他找个花销不大的住宅,而且要在海滨。乡下景致壮观,莱姆的冬天又比较僻静,似乎正适合本威克中校的心境。这就激起了人们对他的深切同情与关心。

“可是,”当大伙走上前去迎接他们几位时,安妮自言自语地说,“他也许并不比我更伤心。我无法相信他的前程就这么永远葬送了。他比我年轻,在感情上比我年轻,如果不在事实上的话。他作为一个男子汉,是比我年轻。他会重新振作起来,找到新的伴侣。”

大家相见了,作了介绍。哈维尔上校是个高大黝黑的男子,聪敏和善,腿有点跛,由于面目粗犷和身体欠佳的缘故,看上去比温特沃思上校老相得多。本威克中校看样子是三人中最年轻的,事实上也是如此,同他俩比起来,他是个小个子。他长着一副讨人喜欢的面孔,不过理所当然,神态比较忧郁,不太肯说话。

哈维尔上校虽然在举止上比不上温特沃思上校,但却是个极有教养的人,他为人真挚热情,乐于助人。哈维尔夫人不像丈夫那样教养有素,不过似乎同样很热情。两人和蔼可亲极了,因为那伙人是温特沃思上校的朋友,他俩便把他们统统看作自己的朋友。他们还极为亲切好客,一再恳请大伙同他们一起共进晚餐。众人推托说他们已在旅馆订好了晚餐,他俩虽然最后终于勉勉强强地认可了,但是对于温特沃思上校能把这样一伙朋友带到莱姆,而居然没有理所当然地想到和他们一起共进晚餐,仿佛感到有些生气。

从这件事里可以看出,他们对温特沃思上校怀有无比深厚的感情,殷勤好客到那样罕见的地步,实在令人为之神驰。他们的邀请不像通常意义上的礼尚往来,不像那种拘泥礼仪、炫耀自己的请客吃饭,因此安妮觉得,她要是和他的同事军官进一步交往下去,精神上不会得到安慰。她心里这么想:“他们本来都该是我的朋友。”她必须尽力克制自己,不要让情绪变得过于低落。

他们离开码头,带着新结交的朋友回到了家里。屋子实在太小,只有真心邀请的主人才认为能坐得下这么多客人。安妮对此也惊奇了一刹那,不过当她看到哈维尔上校独出心裁地做了巧妙安排,使原有的空间得到了充分利用,添置了房子里原来缺少的家具,加固了门窗以抵御冬季风暴的袭击,她不禁沉浸在一种十分舒适的感觉之中。瞧瞧屋里的种种陈设,房主提供的普通必需品,景况都很一般,与此形成鲜明对照的,倒是几件木制珍品,制作得十分精致,另外还有个他从海外带回来的什么珍奇玩意儿,所有这些东西不单单使安妮感觉有趣;因为这一切都同他的职业有关联,是从事这职业的劳动成果,是这职业对他生活习惯产生影响的结果,给他的家庭生活带来了一派安逸幸福的景象,这就使她多少产生了一种似喜非喜的感觉。

哈维尔上校不是个读书人,不过本威克中校倒收藏了不少装帧精致的书籍。他经过巧妙的设计,腾出了极好的地方,制作了非常漂亮的书架。他由于脚玻,不能多运动,但他富有心计,爱动脑筋,使他在屋里始终忙个不停。他画画,上油漆,刨刨锯锯,胶胶贴贴,为孩子做玩具;制作经过改进的新织网梭;如果所有的事情都办完了,就坐在屋子的一角,摆弄他的那张大鱼网。

大家离开哈维尔上校寓所时,安妮觉得自己把欢愉抛到了后面。她走在路易莎旁边,只听她欣喜若狂地对海军的气质大加赞扬,说他们亲切友好,情同手足,坦率豪爽。她还坚信,在英国,水兵比任何人都更可贵,更热情,只有他们才知道应该如何生活,只有他们才值得尊敬和热爱。

众人回去更衣吃饭。他们的计划已经取得了圆满的成功,一切都很称心如意。不过还是说了些诸如“来得不是时候”、“莱姆不是交通要道”、“遇不到什么旅伴”之类的话,旅馆老板只好连连道歉。

安妮起初设想,她永远不会习惯于同温特沃思上校呆在一起,谁想现在居然发现,她对于同他在一起已经越来越习以为常了,如今同他坐在同一张桌前,说上几句一般的客套话(他们从不越雷池一步),已经变得完全无所谓了。

夜晚天太暗,夫人小姐们不便再相聚,只好等到明日,不过哈维尔上校答应过,晚上来看望大家。他来了,还带着他的朋友,这是出乎众人意料之外的,因为大家一致认为,本威克中校当着这么多稀客的面,显得非常沉闷。可他还是大胆地来了,虽然他的情绪同众人的欢乐气氛似乎很不协调。

温特沃思上校和哈维尔上校在屋子的一边带头说着话,重新提起了逝去的岁月,用丰富多彩的奇闻轶事为大家取乐逗趣。这当儿,安妮恰巧同本威克中校坐在一起,离着众人很远。她天生一副好性子,情不自禁地与他攀谈起来。他羞羞答答的,还常常心不在焉。不过她神情温柔迷人,举止温文尔雅,很快便产生了效果,她开头的一番努力得到了充分的报答。显然,本威克是个酷爱读书的年轻人,不过他更喜欢读诗。安妮相信,他的老朋友们可能对这些话题不感兴趣,这次她至少同他畅谈了一个晚上。谈话中,她自然而然地提起了向痛苦作斗争的义务和益处,她觉得这些话对他可能真正有些作用。因为他虽说有些腼腆,但似乎并不拘谨,看来他很乐意冲破惯常的感情约束。他们谈起了诗歌,谈起了现代诗歌的丰富多彩,简要比较了一下他们对几位第一流诗人的看法,试图确定《玛密安》与《湖上夫人》①哪一篇更可取,如何评价《异教徒》和《阿比多斯的新娘》②,以及《异教徒》的英文该怎么念。看来,他对前一位诗人充满柔情的诗篇和后一位诗人悲痛欲绝的深沉描写,全部了如指掌。他带着激动的感情,背诵了几节描写肝肠寸断、痛不欲生的诗句,看上去完全是想得到别人的理解。安妮因此冒昧地希望他不要一味地光读诗,还说酷爱吟诗的人欣赏起诗歌来很难确保安然无恙;只有具备强烈的感情才能真正欣赏诗歌,而这强烈的感情在鉴赏诗歌时又不能不有所节制。

他的神色显不出痛苦的样子,相反却对她暗喻自己的处境感到高兴,安妮也就放心大胆地说了下去。她觉得自己忍受痛苦的资历比他长一些,便大胆地建议他在日常学习中多读些散文。当对方要求她说得具体些,她提到了一些优秀道德家的作品、卓越文学家的文集,以及一些有作为的、遭受种种磨难的人物的回忆录。她当时想到了这些人,觉得他们对道德和宗教上的忍耐做出了最高尚的说教,树立了最崇高的榜样,可以激励人的精神,坚定人的意志。

本威克中校聚精会神地听着,似乎对她话里包含的关心十分感激。他虽然摇了摇头,叹了几口气,表明他不大相信有什么书能解除他的痛苦,但他还是记下了她所推荐的那些书,而且答应找来读读。

夜晚结束了,安妮一想起自己来到莱姆以后,居然劝诫一位素昧平生的小伙子要忍耐,要顺从天命,心里不禁觉得好笑起来。可是再仔细一考虑,她不由得又有几分害怕,因为像其他许多大道德家、说教者一样,她虽然说起来头头是道,可她自己的行为却经不起检验。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 fixed JsKzzj     
adj.固定的,不变的,准备好的;(计算机)固定的
参考例句:
  • Have you two fixed on a date for the wedding yet?你们俩选定婚期了吗?
  • Once the aim is fixed,we should not change it arbitrarily.目标一旦确定,我们就不应该随意改变。
2 affected TzUzg0     
adj.不自然的,假装的
参考例句:
  • She showed an affected interest in our subject.她假装对我们的课题感到兴趣。
  • His manners are affected.他的态度不自然。
3 intercourse NbMzU     
n.性交;交流,交往,交际
参考例句:
  • The magazine becomes a cultural medium of intercourse between the two peoples.该杂志成为两民族间文化交流的媒介。
  • There was close intercourse between them.他们过往很密。
4 renewal UtZyW     
adj.(契约)延期,续订,更新,复活,重来
参考例句:
  • Her contract is coming up for renewal in the autumn.她的合同秋天就应该续签了。
  • Easter eggs symbolize the renewal of life.复活蛋象征新生。
5 solicitude mFEza     
n.焦虑
参考例句:
  • Your solicitude was a great consolation to me.你对我的关怀给了我莫大的安慰。
  • He is full of tender solicitude towards my sister.他对我妹妹满心牵挂。
6 diversified eumz2W     
adj.多样化的,多种经营的v.使多样化,多样化( diversify的过去式和过去分词 );进入新的商业领域
参考例句:
  • The college biology department has diversified by adding new courses in biotechnology. 该学院生物系通过增加生物技术方面的新课程而变得多样化。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Take grain as the key link, develop a diversified economy and ensure an all-round development. 以粮为纲,多种经营,全面发展。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
7 justify j3DxR     
vt.证明…正当(或有理),为…辩护
参考例句:
  • He tried to justify his absence with lame excuses.他想用站不住脚的借口为自己的缺席辩解。
  • Can you justify your rude behavior to me?你能向我证明你的粗野行为是有道理的吗?
8 determined duszmP     
adj.坚定的;有决心的
参考例句:
  • I have determined on going to Tibet after graduation.我已决定毕业后去西藏。
  • He determined to view the rooms behind the office.他决定查看一下办公室后面的房间。
9 immediate aapxh     
adj.立即的;直接的,最接近的;紧靠的
参考例句:
  • His immediate neighbours felt it their duty to call.他的近邻认为他们有责任去拜访。
  • We declared ourselves for the immediate convocation of the meeting.我们主张立即召开这个会议。
10 thither cgRz1o     
adv.向那里;adj.在那边的,对岸的
参考例句:
  • He wandered hither and thither looking for a playmate.他逛来逛去找玩伴。
  • He tramped hither and thither.他到处流浪。
11 deducting a8b7c0fd0943a3e50d5131ea645ec08e     
v.扣除,减去( deduct的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • Deducting drop size and velocity from circular blood stains. 如何从循环的血液中降低血滴的大小和速度。 来自电影对白
  • Ordinary shareholders receive dividend from profit after deducting the preference shares dividend. 普通股股东可获派剩馀的盈利为股息。 来自互联网
12 amendment Mx8zY     
n.改正,修正,改善,修正案
参考例句:
  • The amendment was rejected by 207 voters to 143.这项修正案以207票对143票被否决。
  • The Opposition has tabled an amendment to the bill.反对党已经就该议案提交了一项修正条款。
13 descending descending     
n. 下行 adj. 下降的
参考例句:
  • The results are expressed in descending numerical order . 结果按数字降序列出。
  • The climbers stopped to orient themselves before descending the mountain. 登山者先停下来确定所在的位置,然后再下山。
14 lodgers 873866fb939d5ab097342b033a0e269d     
n.房客,租住者( lodger的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He takes in lodgers. 他招收房客。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • A good proportion of my lodgers is connected with the theaters. 住客里面有不少人是跟戏院子有往来的。 来自辞典例句
15 remarkable 8Vbx6     
adj.显著的,异常的,非凡的,值得注意的
参考例句:
  • She has made remarkable headway in her writing skills.她在写作技巧方面有了长足进步。
  • These cars are remarkable for the quietness of their engines.这些汽车因发动机没有噪音而不同凡响。
16 animated Cz7zMa     
adj.生气勃勃的,活跃的,愉快的
参考例句:
  • His observations gave rise to an animated and lively discussion.他的言论引起了一场气氛热烈而活跃的讨论。
  • We had an animated discussion over current events last evening.昨天晚上我们热烈地讨论时事。
17 retired Njhzyv     
adj.隐退的,退休的,退役的
参考例句:
  • The old man retired to the country for rest.这位老人下乡休息去了。
  • Many retired people take up gardening as a hobby.许多退休的人都以从事园艺为嗜好。
18 chasms 59f980d139181b57c2aa4045ac238a6f     
裂缝( chasm的名词复数 ); 裂口; 分歧; 差别
参考例句:
  • She found great chasms in her mathematics and physics. 她觉得她的数学课和物理课的知识还很欠缺。
  • The sectarian chasms remain deep, the wounds of strife raw. 各派别的分歧巨大,旧恨新仇交织。
19 scattered 7jgzKF     
adj.分散的,稀疏的;散步的;疏疏落落的
参考例句:
  • Gathering up his scattered papers,he pushed them into his case.他把散乱的文件收拾起来,塞进文件夹里。
20 orchards d6be15c5dabd9dea7702c7b892c9330e     
(通常指围起来的)果园( orchard的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • They turned the hills into orchards and plains into granaries. 他们把山坡变成了果园,把平地变成了粮仓。
  • Some of the new planted apple orchards have also begun to bear. 有些新开的苹果园也开始结苹果了。
21 isle fatze     
n.小岛,岛
参考例句:
  • He is from the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea.他来自爱尔兰海的马恩岛。
  • The boat left for the paradise isle of Bali.小船驶向天堂一般的巴厘岛。
22 deserted GukzoL     
adj.荒芜的,荒废的,无人的,被遗弃的
参考例句:
  • The deserted village was filled with a deathly silence.这个荒废的村庄死一般的寂静。
  • The enemy chieftain was opposed and deserted by his followers.敌人头目众叛亲离。
23 melancholy t7rz8     
n.忧郁,愁思;adj.令人感伤(沮丧)的,忧郁的
参考例句:
  • All at once he fell into a state of profound melancholy.他立即陷入无尽的忧思之中。
  • He felt melancholy after he failed the exam.这次考试没通过,他感到很郁闷。
24 pier U22zk     
n.码头;桥墩,桥柱;[建]窗间壁,支柱
参考例句:
  • The pier of the bridge has been so badly damaged that experts worry it is unable to bear weight.这座桥的桥桩破损厉害,专家担心它已不能负重。
  • The ship was making towards the pier.船正驶向码头。
25 lieutenant X3GyG     
n.陆军中尉,海军上尉;代理官员,副职官员
参考例句:
  • He was promoted to be a lieutenant in the army.他被提升为陆军中尉。
  • He prevailed on the lieutenant to send in a short note.他说动那个副官,递上了一张简短的便条进去。
26 esteem imhyZ     
n.尊敬,尊重;vt.尊重,敬重;把…看作
参考例句:
  • I did not esteem him to be worthy of trust.我认为他不值得信赖。
  • The veteran worker ranks high in public love and esteem.那位老工人深受大伙的爱戴。
27 perfectly 8Mzxb     
adv.完美地,无可非议地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The witnesses were each perfectly certain of what they said.证人们个个对自己所说的话十分肯定。
  • Everything that we're doing is all perfectly above board.我们做的每件事情都是光明正大的。
28 promotion eRLxn     
n.提升,晋级;促销,宣传
参考例句:
  • The teacher conferred with the principal about Dick's promotion.教师与校长商谈了迪克的升级问题。
  • The clerk was given a promotion and an increase in salary.那个职员升了级,加了薪。
29 afflicted aaf4adfe86f9ab55b4275dae2a2e305a     
使受痛苦,折磨( afflict的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • About 40% of the country's population is afflicted with the disease. 全国40%左右的人口患有这种疾病。
  • A terrible restlessness that was like to hunger afflicted Martin Eden. 一阵可怕的、跟饥饿差不多的不安情绪折磨着马丁·伊登。
30 disposition GljzO     
n.性情,性格;意向,倾向;排列,部署
参考例句:
  • He has made a good disposition of his property.他已对财产作了妥善处理。
  • He has a cheerful disposition.他性情开朗。
31 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  • This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  • There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
32 Augmented b45f39670f767b2c62c8d6b211cbcb1a     
adj.增音的 动词augment的过去式和过去分词形式
参考例句:
  • 'scientists won't be replaced," he claims, "but they will be augmented." 他宣称:“科学家不会被取代;相反,他们会被拓展。” 来自英汉非文学 - 科学史
  • The impact of the report was augmented by its timing. 由于发表的时间选得好,这篇报导的影响更大了。
33 entirely entirely     
ad.全部地,完整地;完全地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The fire was entirely caused by their neglect of duty. 那场火灾完全是由于他们失职而引起的。
  • His life was entirely given up to the educational work. 他的一生统统献给了教育工作。
34 grandeur hejz9     
n.伟大,崇高,宏伟,庄严,豪华
参考例句:
  • The grandeur of the Great Wall is unmatched.长城的壮观是独一无二的。
  • These ruins sufficiently attest the former grandeur of the place.这些遗迹充分证明此处昔日的宏伟。
35 retirement TWoxH     
n.退休,退职
参考例句:
  • She wanted to enjoy her retirement without being beset by financial worries.她想享受退休生活而不必为金钱担忧。
  • I have to put everything away for my retirement.我必须把一切都积蓄起来以便退休后用。
36 prospects fkVzpY     
n.希望,前途(恒为复数)
参考例句:
  • There is a mood of pessimism in the company about future job prospects. 公司中有一种对工作前景悲观的情绪。
  • They are less sanguine about the company's long-term prospects. 他们对公司的远景不那么乐观。
37 blighted zxQzsD     
adj.枯萎的,摧毁的
参考例句:
  • Blighted stems often canker.有病的茎往往溃烂。
  • She threw away a blighted rose.她把枯萎的玫瑰花扔掉了。
38 benevolent Wtfzx     
adj.仁慈的,乐善好施的
参考例句:
  • His benevolent nature prevented him from refusing any beggar who accosted him.他乐善好施的本性使他不会拒绝走上前向他行乞的任何一个乞丐。
  • He was a benevolent old man and he wouldn't hurt a fly.他是一个仁慈的老人,连只苍蝇都不愿伤害。
39 countenance iztxc     
n.脸色,面容;面部表情;vt.支持,赞同
参考例句:
  • At the sight of this photograph he changed his countenance.他一看见这张照片脸色就变了。
  • I made a fierce countenance as if I would eat him alive.我脸色恶狠狠地,仿佛要把他活生生地吞下去。
40 lame r9gzj     
adj.跛的,(辩解、论据等)无说服力的
参考例句:
  • The lame man needs a stick when he walks.那跛脚男子走路时需借助拐棍。
  • I don't believe his story.It'sounds a bit lame.我不信他讲的那一套。他的话听起来有些靠不住。
41 kindly tpUzhQ     
adj.和蔼的,温和的,爽快的;adv.温和地,亲切地
参考例句:
  • Her neighbours spoke of her as kindly and hospitable.她的邻居都说她和蔼可亲、热情好客。
  • A shadow passed over the kindly face of the old woman.一道阴影掠过老太太慈祥的面孔。
42 hospitable CcHxA     
adj.好客的;宽容的;有利的,适宜的
参考例句:
  • The man is very hospitable.He keeps open house for his friends and fellow-workers.那人十分好客,无论是他的朋友还是同事,他都盛情接待。
  • The locals are hospitable and welcoming.当地人热情好客。
43 entreaties d56c170cf2a22c1ecef1ae585b702562     
n.恳求,乞求( entreaty的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He began with entreaties and ended with a threat. 他先是恳求,最后是威胁。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The tyrant was deaf to the entreaties of the slaves. 暴君听不到奴隶们的哀鸣。 来自《简明英汉词典》
44 promising BkQzsk     
adj.有希望的,有前途的
参考例句:
  • The results of the experiments are very promising.实验的结果充满了希望。
  • We're trying to bring along one or two promising young swimmers.我们正设法培养出一两名有前途的年轻游泳选手。
45 unwillingly wjjwC     
adv.不情愿地
参考例句:
  • He submitted unwillingly to his mother. 他不情愿地屈服于他母亲。
  • Even when I call, he receives unwillingly. 即使我登门拜访,他也是很不情愿地接待我。
46 attachment POpy1     
n.附属物,附件;依恋;依附
参考例句:
  • She has a great attachment to her sister.她十分依恋她的姐姐。
  • She's on attachment to the Ministry of Defense.她现在隶属于国防部。
47 uncommon AlPwO     
adj.罕见的,非凡的,不平常的
参考例句:
  • Such attitudes were not at all uncommon thirty years ago.这些看法在30年前很常见。
  • Phil has uncommon intelligence.菲尔智力超群。
48 astonishment VvjzR     
n.惊奇,惊异
参考例句:
  • They heard him give a loud shout of astonishment.他们听见他惊奇地大叫一声。
  • I was filled with astonishment at her strange action.我对她的奇怪举动不胜惊异。
49 plight 820zI     
n.困境,境况,誓约,艰难;vt.宣誓,保证,约定
参考例句:
  • The leader was much concerned over the plight of the refugees.那位领袖对难民的困境很担忧。
  • She was in a most helpless plight.她真不知如何是好。
50 repose KVGxQ     
v.(使)休息;n.安息
参考例句:
  • Don't disturb her repose.不要打扰她休息。
  • Her mouth seemed always to be smiling,even in repose.她的嘴角似乎总是挂着微笑,即使在睡眠时也是这样。
51 contrived ivBzmO     
adj.不自然的,做作的;虚构的
参考例句:
  • There was nothing contrived or calculated about what he said.他说的话里没有任何蓄意捏造的成分。
  • The plot seems contrived.情节看起来不真实。
52 lameness a89205359251bdc80ff56673115a9d3c     
n. 跛, 瘸, 残废
参考例句:
  • Having been laughed at for his lameness,the boy became shy and inhibited. 那男孩因跛脚被人讥笑,变得羞怯而压抑。
  • By reason of his lameness the boy could not play games. 这男孩因脚跛不能做游戏。
53 ingenuity 77TxM     
n.别出心裁;善于发明创造
参考例句:
  • The boy showed ingenuity in making toys.那个小男孩做玩具很有创造力。
  • I admire your ingenuity and perseverance.我钦佩你的别出心裁和毅力。
54 varnished 14996fe4d70a450f91e6de0005fd6d4d     
浸渍过的,涂漆的
参考例句:
  • The doors are then stained and varnished. 这些门还要染色涂清漆。
  • He varnished the wooden table. 他给那张木桌涂了清漆。
55 forth Hzdz2     
adv.向前;向外,往外
参考例句:
  • The wind moved the trees gently back and forth.风吹得树轻轻地来回摇晃。
  • He gave forth a series of works in rapid succession.他很快连续发表了一系列的作品。
56 raptures 9c456fd812d0e9fdc436e568ad8e29c6     
极度欢喜( rapture的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • Her heart melted away in secret raptures. 她暗自高兴得心花怒放。
  • The mere thought of his bride moves Pinkerton to raptures. 一想起新娘,平克顿不禁心花怒放。
57 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
58 friendliness nsHz8c     
n.友谊,亲切,亲密
参考例句:
  • Behind the mask of friendliness,I know he really dislikes me.在友善的面具后面,我知道他其实并不喜欢我。
  • His manner was a blend of friendliness and respect.他的态度友善且毕恭毕敬。
59 mere rC1xE     
adj.纯粹的;仅仅,只不过
参考例句:
  • That is a mere repetition of what you said before.那不过是重复了你以前讲的话。
  • It's a mere waste of time waiting any longer.再等下去纯粹是浪费时间。
60 recurring 8kLzK8     
adj.往复的,再次发生的
参考例句:
  • This kind of problem is recurring often. 这类问题经常发生。
  • For our own country, it has been a time for recurring trial. 就我们国家而言,它经过了一个反复考验的时期。
61 anecdotes anecdotes     
n.掌故,趣闻,轶事( anecdote的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • amusing anecdotes about his brief career as an actor 关于他短暂演员生涯的趣闻逸事
  • He related several anecdotes about his first years as a congressman. 他讲述自己初任议员那几年的几则轶事。 来自《简明英汉词典》
62 exertion F7Fyi     
n.尽力,努力
参考例句:
  • We were sweating profusely from the exertion of moving the furniture.我们搬动家具大费气力,累得大汗淋漓。
  • She was hot and breathless from the exertion of cycling uphill.由于用力骑车爬坡,她浑身发热。
63 persuasion wMQxR     
n.劝说;说服;持有某种信仰的宗派
参考例句:
  • He decided to leave only after much persuasion.经过多方劝说,他才决定离开。
  • After a lot of persuasion,she agreed to go.经过多次劝说后,她同意去了。
64 ascertain WNVyN     
vt.发现,确定,查明,弄清
参考例句:
  • It's difficult to ascertain the coal deposits.煤储量很难探明。
  • We must ascertain the responsibility in light of different situtations.我们必须根据不同情况判定责任。
65 allusion CfnyW     
n.暗示,间接提示
参考例句:
  • He made an allusion to a secret plan in his speech.在讲话中他暗示有一项秘密计划。
  • She made no allusion to the incident.她没有提及那个事件。
66 emboldened 174550385d47060dbd95dd372c76aa22     
v.鼓励,使有胆量( embolden的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • Emboldened by the wine, he went over to introduce himself to her. 他借酒壮胆,走上前去向她作自我介绍。
  • His success emboldened him to expand his business. 他有了成就因而激发他进一步扩展业务。 来自《简明英汉词典》
67 memoirs f752e432fe1fefb99ab15f6983cd506c     
n.回忆录;回忆录传( mem,自oir的名词复数)
参考例句:
  • Her memoirs were ghostwritten. 她的回忆录是由别人代写的。
  • I watched a trailer for the screenplay of his memoirs. 我看过以他的回忆录改编成电影的预告片。 来自《简明英汉词典》
68 fortify sgezZ     
v.强化防御,为…设防;加强,强化
参考例句:
  • This country will fortify the coastal areas.该国将加强沿海地区的防御。
  • This treaty forbade the United States to fortify the canal.此条约禁止美国对运河设防。
69 precepts 6abcb2dd9eca38cb6dd99c51d37ea461     
n.规诫,戒律,箴言( precept的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • They accept the Prophet's precepts but reject some of his strictures. 他们接受先知的教训,但拒绝他的种种约束。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
  • The legal philosopher's concern is to ascertain the true nature of all the precepts and norms. 法哲学家的兴趣在于探寻所有规范和准则的性质。 来自辞典例句
70 attentively AyQzjz     
adv.聚精会神地;周到地;谛;凝神
参考例句:
  • She listened attentively while I poured out my problems. 我倾吐心中的烦恼时,她一直在注意听。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • She listened attentively and set down every word he said. 她专心听着,把他说的话一字不漏地记下来。 来自《简明英汉词典》
71 noted 5n4zXc     
adj.著名的,知名的
参考例句:
  • The local hotel is noted for its good table.当地的那家酒店以餐食精美而著称。
  • Jim is noted for arriving late for work.吉姆上班迟到出了名。
72 procure A1GzN     
vt.获得,取得,促成;vi.拉皮条
参考例句:
  • Can you procure some specimens for me?你能替我弄到一些标本吗?
  • I'll try my best to procure you that original French novel.我将尽全力给你搞到那本原版法国小说。
73 eloquent ymLyN     
adj.雄辩的,口才流利的;明白显示出的
参考例句:
  • He was so eloquent that he cut down the finest orator.他能言善辩,胜过最好的演说家。
  • These ruins are an eloquent reminder of the horrors of war.这些废墟形象地提醒人们不要忘记战争的恐怖。


欢迎访问英文小说网http://novel.tingroom.com

©英文小说网 2005-2010

有任何问题,请给我们留言,管理员邮箱:tinglishi@gmail.com  站长QQ :点击发送消息和我们联系56065533