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Chapter 21
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A moment's glance was enough to satisfy Catherine that her apartment was very unlike the one which Henry had endeavoured to alarm her by the description of. It was by no means unreasonably1 large, and contained neither tapestry2 nor velvet3. The walls were papered, the floor was carpeted; the windows were neither less perfect nor more dim than those of the drawing-room below; the furniture, though not of the latest fashion, was handsome and comfortable, and the air of the room altogether far from uncheerful. Her heart instantaneously at ease on this point, she resolved to lose no time in particular examination of anything, as she greatly dreaded4 disobliging the general by any delay. Her habit therefore was thrown off with all possible haste, and she was preparing to unpin the linen6 package, which the chaise-seat had conveyed for her immediate7 accommodation, when her eye suddenly fell on a large high chest, standing8 back in a deep recess9 on one side of the fireplace. The sight of it made her start; and, forgetting everything else, she stood gazing on it in motionless wonder, while these thoughts crossed her:

"This is strange indeed! I did not expect such a sight as this! An immense heavy chest! What can it hold? Why should it be placed here? Pushed back too, as if meant to be out of sight! I will look into it -- cost me what it may, I will look into it -- and directly too -- by daylight. If I stay till evening my candle may go out." She advanced and examined it closely: it was of cedar10, curiously11 inlaid with some darker wood, and raised, about a foot from the ground, on a carved stand of the same. The lock was silver, though tarnished12 from age; at each end were the imperfect remains13 of handles also of silver, broken perhaps prematurely14 by some strange violence; and, on the centre of the lid, was a mysterious cipher15, in the same metal. Catherine bent16 over it intently, but without being able to distinguish anything with certainty. She could not, in whatever direction she took it, believe the last letter to be a T; and yet that it should be anything else in that house was a circumstance to raise no common degree of astonishment17. If not originally theirs, by what strange events could it have fallen into the Tilney family?

Her fearful curiosity was every moment growing greater; and seizing, with trembling hands, the hasp of the lock, she resolved at all hazards to satisfy herself at least as to its contents. With difficulty, for something seemed to resist her efforts, she raised the lid a few inches; but at that moment a sudden knocking at the door of the room made her, starting, quit her hold, and the lid closed with alarming violence. This ill-timed intruder was Miss Tilney's maid, sent by her mistress to be of use to Miss Morland; and though Catherine immediately dismissed her, it recalled her to the sense of what she ought to be doing, and forced her, in spite of her anxious desire to penetrate18 this mystery, to proceed in her dressing19 without further delay. Her progress was not quick, for her thoughts and her eyes were still bent on the object so well calculated to interest and alarm; and though she dared not waste a moment upon a second attempt, she could not remain many paces from the chest. At length, however, having slipped one arm into her gown, her toilette seemed so nearly finished that the impatience20 of her curiosity might safely be indulged. One moment surely might be spared; and, so desperate should be the exertion21 of her strength, that, unless secured by supernatural means, the lid in one moment should be thrown back. With this spirit she sprang forward, and her confidence did not deceive her. Her resolute22 effort threw back the lid, and gave to her astonished eyes the view of a white cotton counterpane, properly folded, reposing23 at one end of the chest in undisputed possession!

She was gazing on it with the first blush of surprise when Miss Tilney, anxious for her friend's being ready, entered the room, and to the rising shame of having harboured for some minutes an absurd expectation, was then added the shame of being caught in so idle a search. "That is a curious old chest, is not it?" said Miss Tilney, as Catherine hastily closed it and turned away to the glass. "It is impossible to say how many generations it has been here. How it came to be first put in this room I know not, but I have not had it moved, because I thought it might sometimes be of use in holding hats and bonnets24. The worst of it is that its weight makes it difficult to open. In that corner, however, it is at least out of the way."

Catherine had no leisure for speech, being at once blushing, tying her gown, and forming wise resolutions with the most violent dispatch. Miss Tilney gently hinted her fear of being late; and in half a minute they ran downstairs together, in an alarm not wholly unfounded, for General Tilney was pacing the drawing-room, his watch in his hand, and having, on the very instant of their entering, pulled the bell with violence, ordered "Dinner to be on table directly!"

Catherine trembled at the emphasis with which he spoke25, and sat pale and breathless, in a most humble26 mood, concerned for his children, and detesting27 old chests; and the general, recovering his politeness as he looked at her, spent the rest of his time in scolding his daughter for so foolishly hurrying her fair friend, who was absolutely out of breath from haste, when there was not the least occasion for hurry in the world: but Catherine could not at all get over the double distress28 of having involved her friend in a lecture and been a great simpleton herself, till they were happily seated at the dinner-table, when the general's complacent29 smiles, and a good appetite of her own, restored her to peace. The dining-parlour was a noble room, suitable in its dimensions to a much larger drawing-room than the one in common use, and fitted up in a style of luxury and expense which was almost lost on the unpractised eye of Catherine, who saw little more than its spaciousness30 and the number of their attendants. Of the former, she spoke aloud her admiration31; and the general, with a very gracious countenance32, acknowledged that it was by no means an ill-sized room, and further confessed that, though as careless on such subjects as most people, he did look upon a tolerably large eating-room as one of the necessaries of life; he supposed, however, "that she must have been used to much better-sized apartments at Mr. Allen's?"

"No, indeed," was Catherine's honest assurance; "Mr. Allen's dining-parlour was not more than half as large," and she had never seen so large a room as this in her life. The general's good humour increased. Why, as he had such rooms, he thought it would be simple not to make use of them; but, upon his honour, he believed there might be more comfort in rooms of only half their size. Mr. Allen's house, he was sure, must be exactly of the true size for rational happiness.

The evening passed without any further disturbance33, and, in the occasional absence of General Tilney, with much positive cheerfulness. It was only in his presence that Catherine felt the smallest fatigue34 from her journey; and even then, even in moments of languor35 or restraint, a sense of general happiness preponderated36, and she could think of her friends in Bath without one wish of being with them.

The night was stormy; the wind had been rising at intervals37 the whole afternoon; and by the time the party broke up, it blew and rained violently. Catherine, as she crossed the hall, listened to the tempest with sensations of awe38; and, when she heard it rage round a corner of the ancient building and close with sudden fury a distant door, felt for the first time that she was really in an abbey. Yes, these were characteristic sounds; they brought to her recollection a countless39 variety of dreadful situations and horrid40 scenes, which such buildings had witnessed, and such storms ushered41 in; and most heartily42 did she rejoice in the happier circumstances attending her entrance within walls so solemn! She had nothing to dread5 from midnight assassins or drunken gallants. Henry had certainly been only in jest in what he had told her that morning. In a house so furnished, and so guarded, she could have nothing to explore or to suffer, and might go to her bedroom as securely as if it had been her own chamber43 at Fullerton. Thus wisely fortifying44 her mind, as she proceeded upstairs, she was enabled, especially on perceiving that Miss Tilney slept only two doors from her, to enter her room with a tolerably stout45 heart; and her spirits were immediately assisted by the cheerful blaze of a wood fire. "How much better is this," said she, as she walked to the fender -- "how much better to find a fire ready lit, than to have to wait shivering in the cold till all the family are in bed, as so many poor girls have been obliged to do, and then to have a faithful old servant frightening one by coming in with a faggot! How glad I am that Northanger is what it is! If it had been like some other places, I do not know that, in such a night as this, I could have answered for my courage: but now, to be sure, there is nothing to alarm one."

She looked round the room. The window curtains seemed in motion. It could be nothing but the violence of the wind penetrating46 through the divisions of the shutters47; and she stepped boldly forward, carelessly humming a tune49, to assure herself of its being so, peeped courageously50 behind each curtain, saw nothing on either low window seat to scare her, and on placing a hand against the shutter48, felt the strongest conviction of the wind's force. A glance at the old chest, as she turned away from this examination, was not without its use; she scorned the causeless fears of an idle fancy, and began with a most happy indifference51 to prepare herself for bed. "She should take her time; she should not hurry herself; she did not care if she were the last person up in the house. But she would not make up her fire; that would seem cowardly, as if she wished for the protection of light after she were in bed." The fire therefore died away, and Catherine, having spent the best part of an hour in her arrangements, was beginning to think of stepping into bed, when, on giving a parting glance round the room, she was struck by the appearance of a high, old-fashioned black cabinet, which, though in a situation conspicuous52 enough, had never caught her notice before. Henry's words, his description of the ebony cabinet which was to escape her observation at first, immediately rushed across her; and though there could be nothing really in it, there was something whimsical, it was certainly a very remarkable53 coincidence! She took her candle and looked closely at the cabinet. It was not absolutely ebony and gold; but it was japan, black and yellow japan of the handsomest kind; and as she held her candle, the yellow had very much the effect of gold. The key was in the door, and she had a strange fancy to look into it; not, however, with the smallest expectation of finding anything, but it was so very odd, after what Henry had said. In short, she could not sleep till she had examined it. So, placing the candle with great caution on a chair, she seized the key with a very tremulous hand and tried to turn it; but it resisted her utmost strength. Alarmed, but not discouraged, she tried it another way; a bolt flew, and she believed herself successful; but how strangely mysterious! The door was still immovable. She paused a moment in breathless wonder. The wind roared down the chimney, the rain beat in torrents54 against the windows, and everything seemed to speak the awfulness of her situation. To retire to bed, however, unsatisfied on such a point, would be vain, since sleep must be impossible with the consciousness of a cabinet so mysteriously closed in her immediate vicinity. Again, therefore, she applied55 herself to the key, and after moving it in every possible way for some instants with the determined56 celerity of hope's last effort, the door suddenly yielded to her hand: her heart leaped with exultation57 at such a victory, and having thrown open each folding door, the second being secured only by bolts of less wonderful construction than the lock, though in that her eye could not discern anything unusual, a double range of small drawers appeared in view, with some larger drawers above and below them; and in the centre, a small door, closed also with a lock and key, secured in all probability a cavity of importance.

Catherine's heart beat quick, but her courage did not fail her. With a cheek flushed by hope, and an eye straining with curiosity, her fingers grasped the handle of a drawer and drew it forth58. It was entirely59 empty. With less alarm and greater eagerness she seized a second, a third, a fourth; each was equally empty. Not one was left unsearched, and in not one was anything found. Well read in the art of concealing60 a treasure, the possibility of false linings61 to the drawers did not escape her, and she felt round each with anxious acuteness in vain. The place in the middle alone remained now unexplored; and though she had "never from the first had the smallest idea of finding anything in any part of the cabinet, and was not in the least disappointed at her ill success thus far, it would be foolish not to examine it thoroughly62 while she was about it." It was some time however before she could unfasten the door, the same difficulty occurring in the management of this inner lock as of the outer; but at length it did open; and not vain, as hitherto, was her search; her quick eyes directly fell on a roll of paper pushed back into the further part of the cavity, apparently63 for concealment64, and her feelings at that moment were indescribable. Her heart fluttered, her knees trembled, and her cheeks grew pale. She seized, with an unsteady hand, the precious manuscript, for half a glance sufficed to ascertain65 written characters; and while she acknowledged with awful sensations this striking exemplification of what Henry had foretold66, resolved instantly to peruse67 every line before she attempted to rest.

The dimness of the light her candle emitted made her turn to it with alarm; but there was no danger of its sudden extinction68; it had yet some hours to burn; and that she might not have any greater difficulty in distinguishing the writing than what its ancient date might occasion, she hastily snuffed it. Alas69! It was snuffed and extinguished in one. A lamp could not have expired with more awful effect. Catherine, for a few moments, was motionless with horror. It was done completely; not a remnant of light in the wick could give hope to the rekindling70 breath. Darkness impenetrable and immovable filled the room. A violent gust71 of wind, rising with sudden fury, added fresh horror to the moment. Catherine trembled from head to foot. In the pause which succeeded, a sound like receding72 footsteps and the closing of a distant door struck on her affrighted ear. Human nature could support no more. A cold sweat stood on her forehead, the manuscript fell from her hand, and groping her way to the bed, she jumped hastily in, and sought some suspension of agony by creeping far underneath73 the clothes. To close her eyes in sleep that night, she felt must be entirely out of the question. With a curiosity so justly awakened74, and feelings in every way so agitated75, repose76 must be absolutely impossible. The storm too abroad so dreadful! She had not been used to feel alarm from wind, but now every blast seemed fraught77 with awful intelligence. The manuscript so wonderfully found, so wonderfully accomplishing the morning's prediction, how was it to be accounted for? What could it contain? To whom could it relate? By what means could it have been so long concealed78? And how singularly strange that it should fall to her lot to discover it! Till she had made herself mistress of its contents, however, she could have neither repose nor comfort; and with the sun's first rays she was determined to peruse it. But many were the tedious hours which must yet intervene. She shuddered79, tossed about in her bed, and envied every quiet sleeper80. The storm still raged, and various were the noises, more terrific even than the wind, which struck at intervals on her startled ear. The very curtains of her bed seemed at one moment in motion, and at another the lock of her door was agitated, as if by the attempt of somebody to enter. Hollow murmurs81 seemed to creep along the gallery, and more than once her blood was chilled by the sound of distant moans. Hour after hour passed away, and the wearied Catherine had heard three proclaimed by all the clocks in the house before the tempest subsided82 or she unknowingly fell fast asleep.

凯瑟琳只扫视了一眼便发现,她的房间与亨利试图吓唬她而描绘的那个房间截然不同。它决非大得出奇,既没有挂毯,也没有丝绒被褥。墙上糊着纸,地板上铺着地毯,窗户和楼下客厅里的一样完备,一样光亮。家具虽则不是最新的式样,却也美观,舒适,整个房间的气氛一点也不阴森。她在这一点上放心以后,便决定不再耽误时间去细看什么东西,因为她唯恐拖拖拉拉会惹得将军不高兴。于是,她急急忙忙脱掉衣服,准备打开包衣服的包裹,为了随身应用,她把这个包裹放在马车座位上带来了。恰在这时,她突然发现一只又高又大的箱子,立在壁炉旁的一个深凹处,一见到这只箱子,她心里不由得一震。她忘记了别的一切,惊奇得一动不动地凝视着箱子,心里这样想道:

“真奇怪呀!没料想会见到这样一个东西!一只笨重的大箱子!里面可能装着什么呢?怎么会放在这里呢?放在这个偏僻处,像是不想让人看见!我要打开看看。不管付出多大代价,我也要打开看看,而且马上就干——趁着天亮。要是等到晚上,蜡烛会燃光的。”她走过去仔细端详了一阵。这是只杉木箱,上面十分古怪地镶着一些深色木头,放在一只用同样木料做成的雕花架子上,离地约有一英尺。锁是银质的,但是年深月久已经失去了光泽。箱子两端有两个残缺不全的把手,也是银质的,兴许很早就被一种奇怪的暴力破坏了。箱子盖中央有个神秘的银质花押。凯瑟琳低着头仔细查看,但是辨不出到底是什么字。她无论从哪边看,也无法相信最后一个字母是“T”。然而, 在他们家里出现别的字母,倒会激起非同一般的惊讶。假如这箱子当初不是他们的,那会因为什么奇怪的缘故,才落到蒂尔尼家的手里呢?

她那惶惶不安的好奇心无时无刻不在增长。她用颤抖的双手抓住锁扣,决心冒着一切风险,至少查清里面装着什么。她似乎遇到了一种抗拒力,好不容易才把箱盖揭起了几英寸。不想恰在这时,一阵突如其来的叩门声把她吓了一跳,她一撒手, 箱盖砰的一声关上了,令人胆战心惊。这位不速之客是蒂尔尼小姐的女仆,受主人差遣,前来给莫兰小姐帮忙。凯瑟琳立即把她打发走了,不过这提醒她想起了她应该做的事,迫使她撇开自己想要揭开这个秘密的急切愿望,马上继续穿衣服。她的进展并不迅速,因为她的心思和目光仍然集注在那件想必有趣而又可怕的物体上。她虽说不敢耽误工夫再试一次,但她的脚步又离不开箱子多远。最后,她终于把一只胳膊伸进了袖子,梳妆似乎也快结束,她可以放心大胆地满足一下她那迫不及待的好奇心了。一会儿工夫无疑是抽得出来的,她要拼命使尽浑身的力气,箱盖只要不是用妖术锁上的,她瞬间就能把它打开。她带着这种气概跃向前去,她的信心没有白费。她果断地一使劲,把箱盖揭开了,两眼惊奇地见到一条白布床单,叠得整整齐齐的,放在箱子的一端,除此之外,箱里别无他物!

凯瑟琳呆呆地望着床单,惊奇之中脸上刚绽出点红晕,没想到蒂尔尼小姐急于让朋友作好准备,冷不防走进屋来。凯瑟琳本来正为自己的一阵荒唐期待感到羞愧,现在又被人撞见在如此无聊地翻箱倒柜,越发感到羞愧满面。“这是一只很古怪的旧箱子,是吧?”当凯瑟琳急忙关上箱子,转身对着镜子时,蒂尔尼小姐说道。“它放在这里说不上有多少代了。不知道它起初是怎么给放到这间屋子里来的,不过我一直没让他们把它搬走,因为我觉得它有时兴许有点用处,装装帽子之类的。最糟糕的是、它太沉了不好开。不过放在那个角上,起码不碍事。”

凯瑟琳顾不得说话。她红着个脸,一边系衣服,一边迅疾地痛下决心,以后再不做这种傻事。蒂尔尼小姐委婉地暗示说,她担心要迟到。半分钟工夫.两人便惶惶地跑下楼去。她们的惊恐并非完全没有道理,因为蒂尔尼将军正拿着表在客厅里踱来踱去,一见她们进门,便用力拉了拉铃,命令道:“马上开饭!”

凯瑟琳听到将军加重语气说话,不由得颤抖起来。她怯生生地坐在那里,面色苍白,呼吸急促,一面为他的孩子担心,一面憎恨旧箱子。将军望了望她,重又变得客气起来,余下的时间就用来责骂女儿,说是本来一点用不着匆忙的事情,她却愚蠢地去催促她的漂亮朋友,逼得她上气不接下气。凯瑟琳害得她的朋友挨骂,而她自己又是这么个大傻瓜,她根本无法消除这双重的痛苦。直到大家高高兴兴地围着餐桌坐下,将军露出一副得意的笑脸,她自己又来了胃口,心里才恢复了平静。。这间餐厅是个华丽的大房间,从大小来看,要有一间比共用客厅大得多的客厅才相称。而且,它装饰得也十分奢华,可惜凯瑟琳是个外行。对此几乎浑然不觉,她只见到屋子宽敞,侍者众多。她高声赞赏屋子宽敞,将军和颜悦色地承认,这间屋子的确不算小。他还进一步承认,他虽说在这种事情上像多数人一样马马虎虎,但他却把一间比较大的餐厅视为生活上的一项需要。不过他料想,凯瑟琳在艾伦先生府上一定习惯于比这大得多的房间。

“不,的确不是这样,”凯瑟琳老老实实地说道;,“艾伦先生的餐厅还没有这一半大。”她从未见过这么大的屋子。将军听了越发高兴。噢,既然他有这样的屋子,要是不加以利用可就太傻了。不过说实话,他相信比这小一半的屋子可能更舒适。他敢说,艾伦先生的住宅一定是大小适中,住在里面十分舒适愉快。

当晚没有出现别的风波,蒂尔尼将军偶尔不在时,大家还觉得十分愉快。只有将军在场的时候,凯瑟琳才稍许感到旅途的疲乏。即便这时.即便在疲惫或者拘谨的当儿,她仍然有一种事事如意的感觉。她想到巴思的朋友时,一点也不希望和他们在一起。

夜里,暴风雨大作。整个下午,都在断断续续地起着风,到席终人散时,掀起了狂风暴雨。凯瑟琳一边穿过大厅,一边带着畏惧的感觉倾听着暴风雨。当她听见狂风凶猛地卷过古寺的一角,猛然哐的一声把远处的一扇门刮上时。心里第一次感到她的确来到了寺院。是的,这是寺院里特有的声音,使她想起了这种建筑所目睹的、这种风暴所带来的种类繁多的可怕情景,可怖场面。使她深感欣喜的是,她来到如此森严的建筑物里,处境总算比较幸运!她用不着惧怕午夜的刺客或是醉醺醺的色徒。亨利那天早晨对她说的,无疑又是闹着玩的。在如此陈设、如此森严的一幢房子里,她既探索不到什么,也不会遭到什么不测,她可以万无一失地去她的卧房,就像在富勒顿去她自己的房间一样。她一面上楼,一面如此机智地坚定自己的信心,特别当她感到蒂尔尼小姐的卧房离她只有两门之隔时,她相当大胆地走进房里。一看炉火熊熊烧得正旺,情绪觉得更加高涨。“真棒多了,”她说着朝炉围子走去。“回来见到炉子生得现成的,这比要在寒气里哆哆嗦嗦地干等强得多。就像许多可怜的姑娘那样,无可奈何地非要等到全家人都上了床,这时才有位忠实的老仆人抱着一捆柴火走进来,把你吓一跳!诺桑觉寺能这样,真是好极了!假如它像别的地方那样,遇到这样的夜晚,我不知道会吓成什么样子。不过,现在实在没有什么好害怕的。”

她环顾了一下房内。窗帘似乎在动。这没什么、只不过是狂风从百叶窗的缝隙里钻进来了。她勇敢地走上前去,满不在乎地哼着曲子,看看是不是这么回事。她大胆地往每个窗帘后头探视了一眼、在矮矮的窗台上没有发现可怕的东西。接着,一把手贴近百叶窗,便对这风的力量确信无疑了。她探查完之后,转身望了望那只旧箱子,这也是不无裨益的。她蔑视那种凭空臆想的恐惧,泰然自若地准备上床。“我应该从从容容的,不要急急忙忙。即使我最后一个上床,我也不在乎。可是我不能给炉子添柴,那样会显得太胆怯了,好像睡在床上还需要亮光壮胆。”于是,炉子渐渐熄灭了,凯瑟琳打点了大半个钟头,眼下正想上床,不料临了扫视一下房间时,猛然发现一只老式的黑色大立柜。这只柜子虽说处在很显眼的位置,但是以前从未引起她的注意。转瞬间,她立刻想起了亨利的话,说她起初注意不到那只乌木柜。虽说这话不会真有什么意思,但是却有些稀奇古怪,当然是个十分惊人的巧合!她拿起蜡烛,仔细端详了一下木柜。木柜并不真是乌木镶金的,而是上的日本漆,最漂亮的黑黄色的日本漆。她举着蜡烛看去,那黄色很像镀金。

钥匙就在柜门上,她有一种奇怪的念头想打开看看,不过丝毫也不指望会发现任何东西,只是听了亨利的话后,觉得太怪诞了。总之,她要打开看看才能睡觉。于是,她小心翼翼地把蜡烛放在椅子上,一只手抖簌簌地抓住了钥匙,用力转动,不想竭尽全力也拧不动。她感到惊恐,但是没有泄气,便换个方向再拧。突然,锁簧腾的一下,她以为成功了,但是多么奇怪,多么不可思议!柜门依然一动不动。她屏着气,愕然歇了片刻。狂风在烟囱里怒吼着。倾盆大雨打在窗户上,似乎一切都说明了她的处境之可怕。但是,不弄清这桩事,上床也是枉然,因为心里惦记着眼前有只柜子神秘地锁着,她是睡不着觉的。因此,她又搬弄钥匙。她怀着最后一线希望,果断利索地朝各个方向拧了一阵之后,柜门猛然打开了。这一胜利使她欣喜若狂,她把两扇折门拉开,那第二扇门只别着几个插销,没有锁来得复杂。不过她看不出那锁有什么异常的地方。两扇折门开了以后,露出两排小抽屉,小抽屉的上下都是些大抽屉,中间有扇小门,也上着锁,插着钥匙,里面很可能是个存放重要物品的秘橱。

凯瑟琳心跳急剧,但她并没失去勇气。心里的希望使她脸上涨得通红,眼睛好奇地瞪得溜圆,手指抓住了一个抽屉的把柄,把它拉开了。里面空空如也。她不像刚才那么惊恐,但是更加急切地拉开第二个、第三个、第四个——个个都是同样空空如也。她把每个抽屉都搜了一遍,可是没有一个有东西。她在书上看过很多隐藏珍宝的诀窍,并未忘掉抽屉里可能设有假衬,急切而敏捷地把每个抽屉周围都摸了摸,结果还是什么也没发现。现在只剩下中间没搜过。虽然她从一开始就丝毫不曾想到会在柜子的任何部位发现什么东西,而且迄今为止对自己的徒劳无益丝毫也不感到灰心,但她不趁便彻底搜查一番,那未免太愚蠢了。不过,她开门就折腾了好半天,因为这把内锁像外锁一样难开。可最后还是打开了,而且搜寻的结果不像先前那样空劳一场,她那迅疾的目光当即落到一卷纸上,这卷纸给推到秘橱里边去了,显然是想把它隐藏起来。此刻,她的心绪真是无法形容。她的心在扑腾,膝盖在颤抖,面颊变得煞白。她用抖索索的手抓住了这卷珍贵的手稿,因为她眼睛稍微一瞥,就能辨明上面有笔迹。她带着敬畏的感觉承认,这事惊人地应验了亨利的预言,便当下打定主意,要在睡觉前逐字逐句地看了一遍。

蜡烛发出幽暗的亮光,她转向这微亮时,不觉心里紧张起来。不过,倒没有立即熄灭的危险,还可以再燃几个钟头。要辨认那些字迹,除了年代久远会带来些麻烦之外,恐怕不会再有任何别的困难了,于是她赶紧剪了剪烛花。天哪!她这一剪,竟然把蜡烛剪灭了。一只灯笼灭了也决不会产生比这更可怕的结果了。半晌,凯瑟琳给吓得一动不动。蜡烛全灭了,烛心上一丝亮光也没有,把它再吹着的希望也破灭了。房里一团漆黑,一点动静都没有。骤然,一阵狂风呼啸而起,顿时增添了新的恐怖。凯瑟琳浑身上下抖作一团。接着,当风势暂停的时候,那受了惊吓的耳朵听到一个声音,像是渐渐消逝的脚步声和远处的关门声。人的天性再也支撑不住了。她的额头冒出一层冷汗,手稿从手里撒落下来。她摸到床边,急忙跳了上去,拼命钻到被窝里,借以消除几分惊恐。她觉得,这天夜里是不可能合眼睡觉了。好奇心被正当地激发起来,情绪也整个给激励起来,睡觉是绝对不可能的。外面的风暴又是那样可怕!她以前并不怕风,可是现在,似乎每一阵狂风都带来了可怖的信息。她如此奇异地发现了手稿,如此奇异地证实了早晨的预言,还要作何解释呢?手稿里写着什么?可能与谁相关?用什么办法隐藏了这么久?事情有多奇怪,居然注定要她来发现!不过,她不搞清其中的内容,心里既不会平静,也不会舒坦。她决定借助第一缕晨随来读手稿。可这中间还要熬过多少沉闷的钟头。她打着哆嗦,在床上辗转反侧,羡慕每一个酣睡的人。风暴仍在逞凶,她那受惊的耳朵不时听到种种声响,甚至觉得比风还要可怖。时而她的床幔似乎在摇晃,时而她的房锁在搅动,仿佛有人企图破门而入。走廊里似乎响起沉沉的咕叹声,好几次,远处的呻吟简直把她的血都凝住了。时间一个钟头一个钟头地过去了,困乏不堪的凯瑟琳听见房子里各处的钟打了三点,随后风暴平息了,也许是她不知不觉地睡熟了。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 unreasonably 7b139a7b80379aa34c95638d4a789e5f     
adv. 不合理地
参考例句:
  • He was also petty, unreasonably querulous, and mean. 他还是个气量狭窄,无事生非,平庸刻薄的人。
  • Food in that restaurant is unreasonably priced. 那家饭店价格不公道。
2 tapestry 7qRy8     
n.挂毯,丰富多采的画面
参考例句:
  • How about this artistic tapestry and this cloisonne vase?这件艺术挂毯和这个景泰蓝花瓶怎么样?
  • The wall of my living room was hung with a tapestry.我的起居室的墙上挂着一块壁毯。
3 velvet 5gqyO     
n.丝绒,天鹅绒;adj.丝绒制的,柔软的
参考例句:
  • This material feels like velvet.这料子摸起来像丝绒。
  • The new settlers wore the finest silk and velvet clothing.新来的移民穿着最华丽的丝绸和天鹅绒衣服。
4 dreaded XuNzI3     
adj.令人畏惧的;害怕的v.害怕,恐惧,担心( dread的过去式和过去分词)
参考例句:
  • The dreaded moment had finally arrived. 可怕的时刻终于来到了。
  • He dreaded having to spend Christmas in hospital. 他害怕非得在医院过圣诞节不可。 来自《用法词典》
5 dread Ekpz8     
vt.担忧,忧虑;惧怕,不敢;n.担忧,畏惧
参考例句:
  • We all dread to think what will happen if the company closes.我们都不敢去想一旦公司关门我们该怎么办。
  • Her heart was relieved of its blankest dread.她极度恐惧的心理消除了。
6 linen W3LyK     
n.亚麻布,亚麻线,亚麻制品;adj.亚麻布制的,亚麻的
参考例句:
  • The worker is starching the linen.这名工人正在给亚麻布上浆。
  • Fine linen and cotton fabrics were known as well as wool.精细的亚麻织品和棉织品像羊毛一样闻名遐迩。
7 immediate aapxh     
adj.立即的;直接的,最接近的;紧靠的
参考例句:
  • His immediate neighbours felt it their duty to call.他的近邻认为他们有责任去拜访。
  • We declared ourselves for the immediate convocation of the meeting.我们主张立即召开这个会议。
8 standing 2hCzgo     
n.持续,地位;adj.永久的,不动的,直立的,不流动的
参考例句:
  • After the earthquake only a few houses were left standing.地震过后只有几幢房屋还立着。
  • They're standing out against any change in the law.他们坚决反对对法律做任何修改。
9 recess pAxzC     
n.短期休息,壁凹(墙上装架子,柜子等凹处)
参考例句:
  • The chairman of the meeting announced a ten-minute recess.会议主席宣布休会10分钟。
  • Parliament was hastily recalled from recess.休会的议员被匆匆召回开会。
10 cedar 3rYz9     
n.雪松,香柏(木)
参考例句:
  • The cedar was about five feet high and very shapely.那棵雪松约有五尺高,风姿优美。
  • She struck the snow from the branches of an old cedar with gray lichen.她把长有灰色地衣的老雪松树枝上的雪打了下来。
11 curiously 3v0zIc     
adv.有求知欲地;好问地;奇特地
参考例句:
  • He looked curiously at the people.他好奇地看着那些人。
  • He took long stealthy strides. His hands were curiously cold.他迈着悄没声息的大步。他的双手出奇地冷。
12 tarnished e927ca787c87e80eddfcb63fbdfc8685     
(通常指金属)(使)失去光泽,(使)变灰暗( tarnish的过去式和过去分词 ); 玷污,败坏
参考例句:
  • The mirrors had tarnished with age. 这些镜子因年深日久而照影不清楚。
  • His bad behaviour has tarnished the good name of the school. 他行为不轨,败坏了学校的声誉。
13 remains 1kMzTy     
n.剩余物,残留物;遗体,遗迹
参考例句:
  • He ate the remains of food hungrily.他狼吞虎咽地吃剩余的食物。
  • The remains of the meal were fed to the dog.残羹剩饭喂狗了。
14 prematurely nlMzW4     
adv.过早地,贸然地
参考例句:
  • She was born prematurely with poorly developed lungs. 她早产,肺部未发育健全。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • His hair was prematurely white, but his busy eyebrows were still jet-black. 他的头发已经白了,不过两道浓眉还是乌黑乌黑的。 来自辞典例句
15 cipher dVuy9     
n.零;无影响力的人;密码
参考例句:
  • All important plans were sent to the police in cipher.所有重要计划均以密码送往警方。
  • He's a mere cipher in the company.他在公司里是个无足轻重的小人物。
16 bent QQ8yD     
n.爱好,癖好;adj.弯的;决心的,一心的
参考例句:
  • He was fully bent upon the project.他一心扑在这项计划上。
  • We bent over backward to help them.我们尽了最大努力帮助他们。
17 astonishment VvjzR     
n.惊奇,惊异
参考例句:
  • They heard him give a loud shout of astonishment.他们听见他惊奇地大叫一声。
  • I was filled with astonishment at her strange action.我对她的奇怪举动不胜惊异。
18 penetrate juSyv     
v.透(渗)入;刺入,刺穿;洞察,了解
参考例句:
  • Western ideas penetrate slowly through the East.西方观念逐渐传入东方。
  • The sunshine could not penetrate where the trees were thickest.阳光不能透入树木最浓密的地方。
19 dressing 1uOzJG     
n.(食物)调料;包扎伤口的用品,敷料
参考例句:
  • Don't spend such a lot of time in dressing yourself.别花那么多时间来打扮自己。
  • The children enjoy dressing up in mother's old clothes.孩子们喜欢穿上妈妈旧时的衣服玩。
20 impatience OaOxC     
n.不耐烦,急躁
参考例句:
  • He expressed impatience at the slow rate of progress.进展缓慢,他显得不耐烦。
  • He gave a stamp of impatience.他不耐烦地跺脚。
21 exertion F7Fyi     
n.尽力,努力
参考例句:
  • We were sweating profusely from the exertion of moving the furniture.我们搬动家具大费气力,累得大汗淋漓。
  • She was hot and breathless from the exertion of cycling uphill.由于用力骑车爬坡,她浑身发热。
22 resolute 2sCyu     
adj.坚决的,果敢的
参考例句:
  • He was resolute in carrying out his plan.他坚决地实行他的计划。
  • The Egyptians offered resolute resistance to the aggressors.埃及人对侵略者作出坚决的反抗。
23 reposing e5aa6734f0fe688069b823ca11532d13     
v.将(手臂等)靠在某人(某物)上( repose的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • His parents were now reposing in the local churchyard. 他的双亲现在长眠于本地教堂墓地。 来自辞典例句
  • The picture shows a nude reposing on a couch. 这幅画表现的是一个人赤身体躺在长沙发上。 来自辞典例句
24 bonnets 8e4529b6df6e389494d272b2f3ae0ead     
n.童帽( bonnet的名词复数 );(烟囱等的)覆盖物;(苏格兰男子的)无边呢帽;(女子戴的)任何一种帽子
参考例句:
  • All the best bonnets of the city were there. 城里戴最漂亮的无边女帽的妇女全都到场了。 来自辞典例句
  • I am tempting you with bonnets and bangles and leading you into a pit. 我是在用帽子和镯子引诱你,引你上钩。 来自飘(部分)
25 spoke XryyC     
n.(车轮的)辐条;轮辐;破坏某人的计划;阻挠某人的行动 v.讲,谈(speak的过去式);说;演说;从某种观点来说
参考例句:
  • They sourced the spoke nuts from our company.他们的轮辐螺帽是从我们公司获得的。
  • The spokes of a wheel are the bars that connect the outer ring to the centre.辐条是轮子上连接外圈与中心的条棒。
26 humble ddjzU     
adj.谦卑的,恭顺的;地位低下的;v.降低,贬低
参考例句:
  • In my humble opinion,he will win the election.依我拙见,他将在选举中获胜。
  • Defeat and failure make people humble.挫折与失败会使人谦卑。
27 detesting b1bf9b63df3fcd4d0c8e4d528e344774     
v.憎恶,嫌恶,痛恨( detest的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • I can't help detesting my relations. 我不由得讨厌我的那些亲戚。 来自辞典例句
  • From to realistic condition detesting and rejecting, then pursue mind abyss strange pleasure. 从对现实状态的厌弃,进而追求心灵深渊的奇诡乐趣。 来自互联网
28 distress 3llzX     
n.苦恼,痛苦,不舒适;不幸;vt.使悲痛
参考例句:
  • Nothing could alleviate his distress.什么都不能减轻他的痛苦。
  • Please don't distress yourself.请你不要忧愁了。
29 complacent JbzyW     
adj.自满的;自鸣得意的
参考例句:
  • We must not become complacent the moment we have some success.我们决不能一见成绩就自满起来。
  • She was complacent about her achievements.她对自己的成绩沾沾自喜。
30 spaciousness 6db589e8e16e3d65c1a623cd6a54af75     
n.宽敞
参考例句:
  • A high ceiling gives a feeling of airness and spaciousness. 天花板高给人一种通风和宽敞的感觉。
  • The tremendous spaciousness of it was glowing with rich gold. 苍茫辽阔的景色染上了一片瑰丽浓艳的金黄色。
31 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
32 countenance iztxc     
n.脸色,面容;面部表情;vt.支持,赞同
参考例句:
  • At the sight of this photograph he changed his countenance.他一看见这张照片脸色就变了。
  • I made a fierce countenance as if I would eat him alive.我脸色恶狠狠地,仿佛要把他活生生地吞下去。
33 disturbance BsNxk     
n.动乱,骚动;打扰,干扰;(身心)失调
参考例句:
  • He is suffering an emotional disturbance.他的情绪受到了困扰。
  • You can work in here without any disturbance.在这儿你可不受任何干扰地工作。
34 fatigue PhVzV     
n.疲劳,劳累
参考例句:
  • The old lady can't bear the fatigue of a long journey.这位老妇人不能忍受长途旅行的疲劳。
  • I have got over my weakness and fatigue.我已从虚弱和疲劳中恢复过来了。
35 languor V3wyb     
n.无精力,倦怠
参考例句:
  • It was hot,yet with a sweet languor about it.天气是炎热的,然而却有一种惬意的懒洋洋的感觉。
  • She,in her languor,had not troubled to eat much.她懒懒的,没吃多少东西。
36 preponderated 3bd36dba50180cd0544d28049aba2e72     
v.超过,胜过( preponderate的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • The verdict of jury sufficiently shows how the evidence preponderated in their minds. 陪审员的裁决充分说明他们心里偏重于哪一方面的证据。 来自辞典例句
37 intervals f46c9d8b430e8c86dea610ec56b7cbef     
n.[军事]间隔( interval的名词复数 );间隔时间;[数学]区间;(戏剧、电影或音乐会的)幕间休息
参考例句:
  • The forecast said there would be sunny intervals and showers. 预报间晴,有阵雨。
  • Meetings take place at fortnightly intervals. 每两周开一次会。
38 awe WNqzC     
n.敬畏,惊惧;vt.使敬畏,使惊惧
参考例句:
  • The sight filled us with awe.这景色使我们大为惊叹。
  • The approaching tornado struck awe in our hearts.正在逼近的龙卷风使我们惊恐万分。
39 countless 7vqz9L     
adj.无数的,多得不计其数的
参考例句:
  • In the war countless innocent people lost their lives.在这场战争中无数无辜的人丧失了性命。
  • I've told you countless times.我已经告诉你无数遍了。
40 horrid arozZj     
adj.可怕的;令人惊恐的;恐怖的;极讨厌的
参考例句:
  • I'm not going to the horrid dinner party.我不打算去参加这次讨厌的宴会。
  • The medicine is horrid and she couldn't get it down.这种药很难吃,她咽不下去。
41 ushered d337b3442ea0cc4312a5950ae8911282     
v.引,领,陪同( usher的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • The secretary ushered me into his office. 秘书把我领进他的办公室。
  • A round of parties ushered in the New Year. 一系列的晚会迎来了新年。 来自《简明英汉词典》
42 heartily Ld3xp     
adv.衷心地,诚恳地,十分,很
参考例句:
  • He ate heartily and went out to look for his horse.他痛快地吃了一顿,就出去找他的马。
  • The host seized my hand and shook it heartily.主人抓住我的手,热情地和我握手。
43 chamber wnky9     
n.房间,寝室;会议厅;议院;会所
参考例句:
  • For many,the dentist's surgery remains a torture chamber.对许多人来说,牙医的治疗室一直是间受刑室。
  • The chamber was ablaze with light.会议厅里灯火辉煌。
44 fortifying 74f03092477ce02d5a404c4756ead70e     
筑防御工事于( fortify的现在分词 ); 筑堡于; 增强; 强化(食品)
参考例句:
  • Fortifying executive function and restraining impulsivity are possible with active interventions. 积极干预可能有助加强执行功能和抑制冲动性。
  • Vingo stopped looking, tightening his face, fortifying himself against still another disappointment. 文戈不再张望,他绷紧脸,仿佛正在鼓足勇气准备迎接另一次失望似的。
46 penetrating ImTzZS     
adj.(声音)响亮的,尖锐的adj.(气味)刺激的adj.(思想)敏锐的,有洞察力的
参考例句:
  • He had an extraordinarily penetrating gaze. 他的目光有股异乎寻常的洞察力。
  • He examined the man with a penetrating gaze. 他以锐利的目光仔细观察了那个人。
47 shutters 74d48a88b636ca064333022eb3458e1f     
百叶窗( shutter的名词复数 ); (照相机的)快门
参考例句:
  • The shop-front is fitted with rolling shutters. 那商店的店门装有卷门。
  • The shutters thumped the wall in the wind. 在风中百叶窗砰砰地碰在墙上。
48 shutter qEpy6     
n.百叶窗;(照相机)快门;关闭装置
参考例句:
  • The camera has a shutter speed of one-sixtieth of a second.这架照像机的快门速度达六十分之一秒。
  • The shutter rattled in the wind.百叶窗在风中发出嘎嘎声。
49 tune NmnwW     
n.调子;和谐,协调;v.调音,调节,调整
参考例句:
  • He'd written a tune,and played it to us on the piano.他写了一段曲子,并在钢琴上弹给我们听。
  • The boy beat out a tune on a tin can.那男孩在易拉罐上敲出一首曲子。
50 courageously wvzz8b     
ad.勇敢地,无畏地
参考例句:
  • Under the correct leadership of the Party Central Committee and the State Council, the army and civilians in flooded areas fought the floods courageously, reducing the losses to the minimum. 在中共中央、国务院的正确领导下,灾区广大军民奋勇抗洪,把灾害的损失减少到了最低限度。
  • He fought death courageously though his life was draining away. 他虽然生命垂危,但仍然勇敢地与死亡作斗争。
51 indifference k8DxO     
n.不感兴趣,不关心,冷淡,不在乎
参考例句:
  • I was disappointed by his indifference more than somewhat.他的漠不关心使我很失望。
  • He feigned indifference to criticism of his work.他假装毫不在意别人批评他的作品。
52 conspicuous spszE     
adj.明眼的,惹人注目的;炫耀的,摆阔气的
参考例句:
  • It is conspicuous that smoking is harmful to health.很明显,抽烟对健康有害。
  • Its colouring makes it highly conspicuous.它的色彩使它非常惹人注目。
53 remarkable 8Vbx6     
adj.显著的,异常的,非凡的,值得注意的
参考例句:
  • She has made remarkable headway in her writing skills.她在写作技巧方面有了长足进步。
  • These cars are remarkable for the quietness of their engines.这些汽车因发动机没有噪音而不同凡响。
54 torrents 0212faa02662ca7703af165c0976cdfd     
n.倾注;奔流( torrent的名词复数 );急流;爆发;连续不断
参考例句:
  • The torrents scoured out a channel down the hill side. 急流沿着山腰冲刷出一条水沟。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  • Sudden rainstorms would bring the mountain torrents rushing down. 突然的暴雨会使山洪暴发。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
55 applied Tz2zXA     
adj.应用的;v.应用,适用
参考例句:
  • She plans to take a course in applied linguistics.她打算学习应用语言学课程。
  • This cream is best applied to the face at night.这种乳霜最好晚上擦脸用。
56 determined duszmP     
adj.坚定的;有决心的
参考例句:
  • I have determined on going to Tibet after graduation.我已决定毕业后去西藏。
  • He determined to view the rooms behind the office.他决定查看一下办公室后面的房间。
57 exultation wzeyn     
n.狂喜,得意
参考例句:
  • It made him catch his breath, it lit his face with exultation. 听了这个名字,他屏住呼吸,乐得脸上放光。
  • He could get up no exultation that was really worthy the name. 他一点都激动不起来。
58 forth Hzdz2     
adv.向前;向外,往外
参考例句:
  • The wind moved the trees gently back and forth.风吹得树轻轻地来回摇晃。
  • He gave forth a series of works in rapid succession.他很快连续发表了一系列的作品。
59 entirely entirely     
ad.全部地,完整地;完全地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The fire was entirely caused by their neglect of duty. 那场火灾完全是由于他们失职而引起的。
  • His life was entirely given up to the educational work. 他的一生统统献给了教育工作。
60 concealing 0522a013e14e769c5852093b349fdc9d     
v.隐藏,隐瞒,遮住( conceal的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • Despite his outward display of friendliness, I sensed he was concealing something. 尽管他表现得友善,我还是感觉到他有所隐瞒。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • SHE WAS BREAKING THE COMPACT, AND CONCEALING IT FROM HIM. 她违反了他们之间的约定,还把他蒙在鼓里。 来自英汉文学 - 三万元遗产
61 linings 08af65d71fb90cd42b87d2d9b97c874f     
n.衬里( lining的名词复数 );里子;衬料;组织
参考例句:
  • a pair of leather gloves with fur linings 一双毛皮衬里的皮手套
  • Many of the garments have the customers' name tags sewn into the linings. 这些衣服有很多内衬上缝有顾客的姓名签。 来自辞典例句
62 thoroughly sgmz0J     
adv.完全地,彻底地,十足地
参考例句:
  • The soil must be thoroughly turned over before planting.一定要先把土地深翻一遍再下种。
  • The soldiers have been thoroughly instructed in the care of their weapons.士兵们都系统地接受过保护武器的训练。
63 apparently tMmyQ     
adv.显然地;表面上,似乎
参考例句:
  • An apparently blind alley leads suddenly into an open space.山穷水尽,豁然开朗。
  • He was apparently much surprised at the news.他对那个消息显然感到十分惊异。
64 concealment AvYzx1     
n.隐藏, 掩盖,隐瞒
参考例句:
  • the concealment of crime 对罪行的隐瞒
  • Stay in concealment until the danger has passed. 把自己藏起来,待危险过去后再出来。
65 ascertain WNVyN     
vt.发现,确定,查明,弄清
参考例句:
  • It's difficult to ascertain the coal deposits.煤储量很难探明。
  • We must ascertain the responsibility in light of different situtations.我们必须根据不同情况判定责任。
66 foretold 99663a6d5a4a4828ce8c220c8fe5dccc     
v.预言,预示( foretell的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • She foretold that the man would die soon. 她预言那人快要死了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Must lose one joy, by his life's star foretold. 这样注定:他,为了信守一个盟誓/就非得拿牺牲一个喜悦作代价。 来自英汉 - 翻译样例 - 文学
67 peruse HMXxT     
v.细读,精读
参考例句:
  • We perused the company's financial statements for the past five years.我们翻阅了公司过去5年来的财务报表。
  • Please peruse this report at your leisure.请在空暇时细读这篇报道。
68 extinction sPwzP     
n.熄灭,消亡,消灭,灭绝,绝种
参考例句:
  • The plant is now in danger of extinction.这种植物现在有绝种的危险。
  • The island's way of life is doomed to extinction.这个岛上的生活方式注定要消失。
69 alas Rx8z1     
int.唉(表示悲伤、忧愁、恐惧等)
参考例句:
  • Alas!The window is broken!哎呀!窗子破了!
  • Alas,the truth is less romantic.然而,真理很少带有浪漫色彩。
70 rekindling cc40d191c1c99f092511caad8ee205cf     
v.使再燃( rekindle的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • There might be a rekindling of the kind of nationalistic fervour of yesteryear. 过去的国家主义狂热可能再次被点燃。 来自互联网
  • Bryant and O'Neal on the floor at the same time, rekindling memories both good and bad. 科比和奥尼尔在地板上在同一时间,死灰复燃的回忆有好有坏。 来自互联网
71 gust q5Zyu     
n.阵风,突然一阵(雨、烟等),(感情的)迸发
参考例句:
  • A gust of wind blew the front door shut.一阵大风吹来,把前门关上了。
  • A gust of happiness swept through her.一股幸福的暖流流遍她的全身。
72 receding c22972dfbef8589fece6affb72f431d1     
v.逐渐远离( recede的现在分词 );向后倾斜;自原处后退或避开别人的注视;尤指问题
参考例句:
  • Desperately he struck out after the receding lights of the yacht. 游艇的灯光渐去渐远,他拼命划水追赶。 来自辞典例句
  • Sounds produced by vehicles receding from us seem lower-pitched than usual. 渐渐远离我们的运载工具发出的声似乎比平常的音调低。 来自辞典例句
73 underneath VKRz2     
adj.在...下面,在...底下;adv.在下面
参考例句:
  • Working underneath the car is always a messy job.在汽车底下工作是件脏活。
  • She wore a coat with a dress underneath.她穿着一件大衣,里面套着一条连衣裙。
74 awakened de71059d0b3cd8a1de21151c9166f9f0     
v.(使)醒( awaken的过去式和过去分词 );(使)觉醒;弄醒;(使)意识到
参考例句:
  • She awakened to the sound of birds singing. 她醒来听到鸟的叫声。
  • The public has been awakened to the full horror of the situation. 公众完全意识到了这一状况的可怕程度。 来自《简明英汉词典》
75 agitated dzgzc2     
adj.被鼓动的,不安的
参考例句:
  • His answers were all mixed up,so agitated was he.他是那样心神不定,回答全乱了。
  • She was agitated because her train was an hour late.她乘坐的火车晚点一个小时,她十分焦虑。
76 repose KVGxQ     
v.(使)休息;n.安息
参考例句:
  • Don't disturb her repose.不要打扰她休息。
  • Her mouth seemed always to be smiling,even in repose.她的嘴角似乎总是挂着微笑,即使在睡眠时也是这样。
77 fraught gfpzp     
adj.充满…的,伴有(危险等)的;忧虑的
参考例句:
  • The coming months will be fraught with fateful decisions.未来数月将充满重大的决定。
  • There's no need to look so fraught!用不着那么愁眉苦脸的!
78 concealed 0v3zxG     
a.隐藏的,隐蔽的
参考例句:
  • The paintings were concealed beneath a thick layer of plaster. 那些画被隐藏在厚厚的灰泥层下面。
  • I think he had a gun concealed about his person. 我认为他当时身上藏有一支枪。
79 shuddered 70137c95ff493fbfede89987ee46ab86     
v.战栗( shudder的过去式和过去分词 );发抖;(机器、车辆等)突然震动;颤动
参考例句:
  • He slammed on the brakes and the car shuddered to a halt. 他猛踩刹车,车颤抖着停住了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • I shuddered at the sight of the dead body. 我一看见那尸体就战栗。 来自《简明英汉词典》
80 sleeper gETyT     
n.睡眠者,卧车,卧铺
参考例句:
  • I usually go up to London on the sleeper. 我一般都乘卧车去伦敦。
  • But first he explained that he was a very heavy sleeper. 但首先他解释说自己睡觉很沉。
81 murmurs f21162b146f5e36f998c75eb9af3e2d9     
n.低沉、连续而不清的声音( murmur的名词复数 );低语声;怨言;嘀咕
参考例句:
  • They spoke in low murmurs. 他们低声说着话。 来自辞典例句
  • They are more superficial, more distinctly heard than murmurs. 它们听起来比心脏杂音更为浅表而清楚。 来自辞典例句
82 subsided 1bda21cef31764468020a8c83598cc0d     
v.(土地)下陷(因在地下采矿)( subside的过去式和过去分词 );减弱;下降至较低或正常水平;一下子坐在椅子等上
参考例句:
  • After the heavy rains part of the road subsided. 大雨过后,部分公路塌陷了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • By evening the storm had subsided and all was quiet again. 傍晚, 暴风雨已经过去,四周开始沉寂下来。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》


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