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Chapter 4

Tom Bertram had of late spent so little of his time at home that he could be only nominally1 missed; and Lady Bertram was soon astonished to find how very well they did even without his father, how well Edmund could supply his place in carving2, talking to the steward3, writing to the attorney, settling with the servants, and equally saving her from all possible fatigue4 or exertion5 in every particular but that of directing her letters.

The earliest intelligence of the travellers' safe arrival at Antigua, after a favourable6 voyage, was received; though not before Mrs. Norris had been indulging in very dreadful fears, and trying to make Edmund participate them whenever she could get him alone; and as she depended on being the first person made acquainted with any fatal catastrophe7, she had already arranged the manner of breaking it to all the others, when Sir Thomas's assurances of their both being alive and well made it necessary to lay by her agitation8 and affectionate preparatory speeches for a while.

The winter came and passed without their being called for; the accounts continued perfectly9 good; and Mrs. Norris, in promoting gaieties for her nieces, assisting their toilets, displaying their accomplishments10, and looking about for their future husbands, had so much to do as, in addition to all her own household cares, some interference in those of her sister, and Mrs. Grant's wasteful11 doings to overlook, left her very little occasion to be occupied in fears for the absent.

The Miss Bertrams were now fully12 established among the belles13 of the neighbourhood; and as they joined to beauty and brilliant acquirements a manner naturally easy, and carefully formed to general civility and obligingness, they possessed14 its favour as well as its admiration15. Their vanity was in such good order that they seemed to be quite free from it, and gave themselves no airs; while the praises attending such behaviour, secured and brought round by their aunt, served to strengthen them in believing they had no faults.

Lady Bertram did not go into public with her daughters. She was too indolent even to accept a mother's gratification in witnessing their success and enjoyment16 at the expense of any personal trouble, and the charge was made over to her sister, who desired nothing better than a post of such honourable17 representation, and very thoroughly18 relished19 the means it afforded her of mixing in society without having horses to hire.

Fanny had no share in the festivities of the season; but she enjoyed being avowedly20 useful as her aunt's companion when they called away the rest of the family; and, as Miss Lee had left Mansfield, she naturally became everything to Lady Bertram during the night of a ball or a party. She talked to her, listened to her, read to her; and the tranquillity21 of such evenings, her perfect security in such a _tete-a-tete_ from any sound of unkindness, was unspeakably welcome to a mind which had seldom known a pause in its alarms or embarrassments22. As to her cousins' gaieties, she loved to hear an account of them, especially of the balls, and whom Edmund had danced with; but thought too lowly of her own situation to imagine she should ever be admitted to the same, and listened, therefore, without an idea of any nearer concern in them. Upon the whole, it was a comfortable winter to her; for though it brought no William to England, the never-failing hope of his arrival was worth much.

The ensuing spring deprived her of her valued friend, the old grey pony23; and for some time she was in danger of feeling the loss in her health as well as in her affections; for in spite of the acknowledged importance of her riding on horse-back, no measures were taken for mounting her again, "because," as it was observed by her aunts, "she might ride one of her cousin's horses at any time when they did not want them," and as the Miss Bertrams regularly wanted their horses every fine day, and had no idea of carrying their obliging manners to the sacrifice of any real pleasure, that time, of course, never came. They took their cheerful rides in the fine mornings of April and May; and Fanny either sat at home the whole day with one aunt, or walked beyond her strength at the instigation of the other: Lady Bertram holding exercise to be as unnecessary for everybody as it was unpleasant to herself; and Mrs. Norris, who was walking all day, thinking everybody ought to walk as much. Edmund was absent at this time, or the evil would have been earlier remedied. When he returned, to understand how Fanny was situated24, and perceived its ill effects, there seemed with him but one thing to be done; and that "Fanny must have a horse" was the resolute25 declaration with which he opposed whatever could be urged by the supineness of his mother, or the economy of his aunt, to make it appear unimportant. Mrs. Norris could not help thinking that some steady old thing might be found among the numbers belonging to the Park that would do vastly well; or that one might be borrowed of the steward; or that perhaps Dr. Grant might now and then lend them the pony he sent to the post. She could not but consider it as absolutely unnecessary, and even improper26, that Fanny should have a regular lady's horse of her own, in the style of her cousins. She was sure Sir Thomas had never intended it: and she must say that, to be making such a purchase in his absence, and adding to the great expenses of his stable, at a time when a large part of his income was unsettled, seemed to her very unjustifiable. "Fanny must have a horse," was Edmund's only reply. Mrs. Norris could not see it in the same light. Lady Bertram did: she entirely27 agreed with her son as to the necessity of it, and as to its being considered necessary by his father; she only pleaded against there being any hurry; she only wanted him to wait till Sir Thomas's return, and then Sir Thomas might settle it all himself. He would be at home in September, and where would be the harm of only waiting till September?

Though Edmund was much more displeased28 with his aunt than with his mother, as evincing least regard for her niece, he could not help paying more attention to what she said; and at length determined29 on a method of proceeding30 which would obviate31 the risk of his father's thinking he had done too much, and at the same time procure32 for Fanny the immediate33 means of exercise, which he could not bear she should be without. He had three horses of his own, but not one that would carry a woman. Two of them were hunters; the third, a useful road-horse: this third he resolved to exchange for one that his cousin might ride; he knew where such a one was to be met with; and having once made up his mind, the whole business was soon completed. The new mare34 proved a treasure; with a very little trouble she became exactly calculated for the purpose, and Fanny was then put in almost full possession of her. She had not supposed before that anything could ever suit her like the old grey pony; but her delight in Edmund's mare was far beyond any former pleasure of the sort; and the addition it was ever receiving in the consideration of that kindness from which her pleasure sprung, was beyond all her words to express. She regarded her cousin as an example of everything good and great, as possessing worth which no one but herself could ever appreciate, and as entitled to such gratitude35 from her as no feelings could be strong enough to pay. Her sentiments towards him were compounded of all that was respectful, grateful, confiding36, and tender.

As the horse continued in name, as well as fact, the property of Edmund, Mrs. Norris could tolerate its being for Fanny's use; and had Lady Bertram ever thought about her own objection again, he might have been excused in her eyes for not waiting till Sir Thomas's return in September, for when September came Sir Thomas was still abroad, and without any near prospect37 of finishing his business. Unfavourable circumstances had suddenly arisen at a moment when he was beginning to turn all his thoughts towards England; and the very great uncertainty38 in which everything was then involved determined him on sending home his son, and waiting the final arrangement by himself Tom arrived safely, bringing an excellent account of his father's health; but to very little purpose, as far as Mrs. Norris was concerned. Sir Thomas's sending away his son seemed to her so like a parent's care, under the influence of a foreboding of evil to himself, that she could not help feeling dreadful presentiments39; and as the long evenings of autumn came on, was so terribly haunted by these ideas, in the sad solitariness40 of her cottage, as to be obliged to take daily refuge in the dining-room of the Park. The return of winter engagements, however, was not without its effect; and in the course of their progress, her mind became so pleasantly occupied in superintending the fortunes of her eldest41 niece, as tolerably to quiet her nerves. "If poor Sir Thomas were fated never to return, it would be peculiarly consoling to see their dear Maria well married," she very often thought; always when they were in the company of men of fortune, and particularly on the introduction of a young man who had recently succeeded to one of the largest estates and finest places in the country.

Mr. Rushworth was from the first struck with the beauty of Miss Bertram, and, being inclined to marry, soon fancied himself in love. He was a heavy young man, with not more than common sense; but as there was nothing disagreeable in his figure or address, the young lady was well pleased with her conquest. Being now in her twenty-first year, Maria Bertram was beginning to think matrimony a duty; and as a marriage with Mr. Rushworth would give her the enjoyment of a larger income than her father's, as well as ensure her the house in town, which was now a prime object, it became, by the same rule of moral obligation, her evident duty to marry Mr. Rushworth if she could. Mrs. Norris was most zealous42 in promoting the match, by every suggestion and contrivance likely to enhance its desirableness to either party; and, among other means, by seeking an intimacy43 with the gentleman's mother, who at present lived with him, and to whom she even forced Lady Bertram to go through ten miles of indifferent road to pay a morning visit. It was not long before a good understanding took place between this lady and herself. Mrs. Rushworth acknowledged herself very desirous that her son should marry, and declared that of all the young ladies she had ever seen, Miss Bertram seemed, by her amiable44 qualities and accomplishments, the best adapted to make him happy. Mrs. Norris accepted the compliment, and admired the nice discernment of character which could so well distinguish merit. Maria was indeed the pride and delight of them all--perfectly faultless-- an angel; and, of course, so surrounded by admirers, must be difficult in her choice: but yet, as far as Mrs. Norris could allow herself to decide on so short an acquaintance, Mr. Rushworth appeared precisely45 the young man to deserve and attach her.

After dancing with each other at a proper number of balls, the young people justified46 these opinions, and an engagement, with a due reference to the absent Sir Thomas, was entered into, much to the satisfaction of their respective families, and of the general lookers-on of the neighbourhood, who had, for many weeks past, felt the expediency47 of Mr. Rushworth's marrying Miss Bertram.

It was some months before Sir Thomas's consent could be received; but, in the meanwhile, as no one felt a doubt of his most cordial pleasure in the connexion, the intercourse48 of the two families was carried on without restraint, and no other attempt made at secrecy49 than Mrs. Norris's talking of it everywhere as a matter not to be talked of at present.

Edmund was the only one of the family who could see a fault in the business; but no representation of his aunt's could induce him to find Mr. Rushworth a desirable companion. He could allow his sister to be the best judge of her own happiness, but he was not pleased that her happiness should centre in a large income; nor could he refrain from often saying to himself, in Mr. Rushworth's company-- "If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow."

Sir Thomas, however, was truly happy in the prospect of an alliance so unquestionably advantageous50, and of which he heard nothing but the perfectly good and agreeable. It was a connexion exactly of the right sort-- in the same county, and the same interest--and his most hearty51 concurrence52 was conveyed as soon as possible. He only conditioned that the marriage should not take place before his return, which he was again looking eagerly forward to. He wrote in April, and had strong hopes of settling everything to his entire satisfaction, and leaving Antigua before the end of the summer.

Such was the state of affairs in the month of July; and Fanny had just reached her eighteenth year, when the society of the village received an addition in the brother and sister of Mrs. Grant, a Mr. and Miss Crawford, the children of her mother by a second marriage. They were young people of fortune. The son had a good estate in Norfolk, the daughter twenty thousand pounds. As children, their sister had been always very fond of them; but, as her own marriage had been soon followed by the death of their common parent, which left them to the care of a brother of their father, of whom Mrs. Grant knew nothing, she had scarcely seen them since. In their uncle's house they had found a kind home. Admiral and Mrs. Crawford, though agreeing in nothing else, were united in affection for these children, or, at least, were no farther adverse53 in their feelings than that each had their favourite, to whom they showed the greatest fondness of the two. The Admiral delighted in the boy, Mrs. Crawford doted on the girl; and it was the lady's death which now obliged her _protegee_, after some months' further trial at her uncle's house, to find another home. Admiral Crawford was a man of vicious conduct, who chose, instead of retaining his niece, to bring his mistress under his own roof; and to this Mrs. Grant was indebted for her sister's proposal of coming to her, a measure quite as welcome on one side as it could be expedient54 on the other; for Mrs. Grant, having by this time run through the usual resources of ladies residing in the country without a family of children--having more than filled her favourite sitting-room55 with pretty furniture, and made a choice collection of plants and poultry--was very much in want of some variety at home. The arrival, therefore, of a sister whom she had always loved, and now hoped to retain with her as long as she remained single, was highly agreeable; and her chief anxiety was lest Mansfield should not satisfy the habits of a young woman who had been mostly used to London.

Miss Crawford was not entirely free from similar apprehensions56, though they arose principally from doubts of her sister's style of living and tone of society; and it was not till after she had tried in vain to persuade her brother to settle with her at his own country house, that she could resolve to hazard herself among her other relations. To anything like a permanence of abode57, or limitation of society, Henry Crawford had, unluckily, a great dislike: he could not accommodate his sister in an article of such importance; but he escorted her, with the utmost kindness, into Northamptonshire, and as readily engaged to fetch her away again, at half an hour's notice, whenever she were weary of the place.

The meeting was very satisfactory on each side. Miss Crawford found a sister without preciseness or rusticity58, a sister's husband who looked the gentleman, and a house commodious59 and well fitted up; and Mrs. Grant received in those whom she hoped to love better than ever a young man and woman of very prepossessing appearance. Mary Crawford was remarkably60 pretty; Henry, though not handsome, had air and countenance61; the manners of both were lively and pleasant, and Mrs. Grant immediately gave them credit for everything else. She was delighted with each, but Mary was her dearest object; and having never been able to glory in beauty of her own, she thoroughly enjoyed the power of being proud of her sister's. She had not waited her arrival to look out for a suitable match for her: she had fixed62 on Tom Bertram; the eldest son of a baronet was not too good for a girl of twenty thousand pounds, with all the elegance63 and accomplishments which Mrs. Grant foresaw in her; and being a warm-hearted, unreserved woman, Mary had not been three hours in the house before she told her what she had planned.

Miss Crawford was glad to find a family of such consequence so very near them, and not at all displeased either at her sister's early care, or the choice it had fallen on. Matrimony was her object, provided she could marry well: and having seen Mr. Bertram in town, she knew that objection could no more be made to his person than to his situation in life. While she treated it as a joke, therefore, she did not forget to think of it seriously. The scheme was soon repeated to Henry.

"And now," added Mrs. Grant, "I have thought of something to make it complete. I should dearly love to settle you both in this country; and therefore, Henry, you shall marry the youngest Miss Bertram, a nice, handsome, good-humoured, accomplished64 girl, who will make you very happy."

Henry bowed and thanked her.

"My dear sister," said Mary, "if you can persuade him into anything of the sort, it will be a fresh matter of delight to me to find myself allied65 to anybody so clever, and I shall only regret that you have not half a dozen daughters to dispose of. If you can persuade Henry to marry, you must have the address of a Frenchwoman. All that English abilities can do has been tried already. I have three very particular friends who have been all dying for him in their turn; and the pains which they, their mothers (very clever women), as well as my dear aunt and myself, have taken to reason, coax66, or trick him into marrying, is inconceivable! He is the most horrible flirt67 that can be imagined. If your Miss Bertrams do not like to have their hearts broke, let them avoid Henry."

"My dear brother, I will not believe this of you."

"No, I am sure you are too good. You will be kinder than Mary. You will allow for the doubts of youth and inexperience. I am of a cautious temper, and unwilling68 to risk my happiness in a hurry. Nobody can think more highly of the matrimonial state than myself I consider the blessing69 of a wife as most justly described in those discreet70 lines of the poet--'Heaven's _last_ best gift.'"

"There, Mrs. Grant, you see how he dwells on one word, and only look at his smile. I assure you he is very detestable; the Admiral's lessons have quite spoiled him."

"I pay very little regard," said Mrs. Grant, "to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess71 a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person."

Dr. Grant laughingly congratulated Miss Crawford on feeling no disinclination to the state herself.

"Oh yes! I am not at all ashamed of it. I would have everybody marry if they can do it properly: I do not like to have people throw themselves away; but everybody should marry as soon as they can do it to advantage."

汤姆·伯特伦临走前本来就很少待在家里,因此家里人只是在名义上觉得缺了他。伯特伦夫人很快便惊奇地发现,即使缺了做父亲的,大家过得也挺好,埃德蒙可以代父亲切肉,跟管家商量事情,给代理人写信,向仆人发工钱,像他父亲一样,一切烦人劳累之事,样样都替她做好了,只不过她自己的信还得由她自己来写。

两位出门人一路平安地抵达安提瓜的消息收到了。可在这之前,诺里斯太太一直担心会出什么非常可怕的事情,而且只要旁边没有人,就让埃德蒙分享她的担忧。她相信,不管发生什么大灾大难,她肯定是最先得到消息,因此她早就想好了如何向众人宣布这噩耗。恰在这时,托马斯爵士来信了,宣告父子俩平安无事。于是,诺里斯太太只得暂时收起她的激动心情和准备宣布噩耗时充满深情的开场白。

冬天来而复去,家里并不需要那父子俩。他们在海外的消息也依然很好。诺里斯太太除了料理自己的家务,过问妹妹的家务,注视格兰特太太的浪费行为,还要出出主意叫外甥女玩得更加开心,帮助她们梳妆打扮,展示她们的才能,给她们物色女婿,忙得她没有心思再为两个远行的人担忧了。

现在,两位伯特伦小姐已被公认属于当地的美女之列。她们不仅模样俊俏,才华出众,而且举止落落大方,刻意表现得彬彬有礼,和蔼可亲,因此深受人们的喜爱和仰慕。她们虽然也爱慕虚荣,但表现得体,好像毫无虚荣之感,也没有装腔作势的架子。她们这般表现所赢得的夸奖,大姨妈听到后又转告给她们,使她们越发相信自己十全十美。

伯特伦夫人不跟女儿们一起出入社交场合。她过于懒散,甚至都不愿牺牲一点个人利益,感受一下做母亲的喜悦,亲自去看看自己的女儿们在社交场合如何荣耀,如何快活,因此每次都把这事托付给姐姐。做姐姐的真是求之不得,以这么体面的身份带着外甥女出入社交场合,也不用自己租马车,可以尽情享用妹妹家提供的一切方便。

社交季节的各种活动并没有范妮的份儿,不过等其他人都出门赴约之后,就剩她陪伴二姨妈,她公然成了有用之人,心里感到乐滋滋的。加上李小姐已离开曼斯菲尔德,每逢举行舞会或宴会的夜晚,她自然就成为伯特伦夫人须臾难离的伙伴。她陪夫人聊天,听她说话,读书给她听,在这静静的夜晚,进行这样的促膝谈心,丝毫不用担心听到什么逆耳的声音,这对于一颗一向吃尽了惶恐不安苦头的心灵来说,真有说不出的喜悦。至于表姐们的娱乐活动,她倒喜欢听她们回来讲述,特别喜欢听她们讲述舞会的情况,讲述埃德蒙和谁跳的舞。不过她认为自己地位低微,不敢奢望自己也能参加那样的舞会,因而听的时候并不怎么太往心里去。总的说来,她觉得这个冬天过得还不错,虽说威廉没在这期间回到英国,可她心里一直期望他会回来,这种期望也是非常可贵的。

随之而来的春天夺去了她心爱的朋友老灰马,一时间,她不仅遭受到感情上的失落,而且感到身体上也要蒙受损失。尽管姨妈她们都承认骑马对她有好处,但却没有采取什么措施让她再有马骑。两位姨妈说:“表姐不骑马的时候,不管是她们谁的马,你随时都可以骑。”然而,两位伯特伦小姐尽管一副热心助人的样子,可每逢天气晴朗总要骑马出去,并不想牺牲任何实质性的乐趣而去关照范妮。4月、5月风和日丽的上午,她们欢天喜地地骑马游玩,而范妮不是整天陪这个姨妈坐在家里,就是受那个姨妈怂恿到外边走得筋疲力尽。伯特伦夫人自己不喜欢活动,便认为谁都没有必要出去活动,可诺里斯太太整天在外面东跑西颠,也就认为谁都应该天天走那么多路。这期间埃德蒙偏偏不在家,否则这不良现象也会早一点得到纠正。等他回来了解了范妮的处境,意识到由此而来的不良后果,他觉得只有一个办法,那就是:“范妮必须有一匹马。”他不顾懒散成性的妈妈和精打细算的姨妈会怎么反对,斩钉截铁地这样宣布。诺里斯太太不由得想到,也许能从庄园的马匹中挑出一匹稳当的老马来,这就满不错了,或者可以向管家借一匹,或者说不定格兰特博士会把他派往驿站取邮件的那匹矮种马偶尔借给他们。她坚持认为,让范妮像两位表姐一样气派,也有一匹自己专用的马,那是绝对没有必要,甚至也不妥当。她断定,托马斯爵士从没有过这样的打算。她必须说明,趁他不在家时给范妮买马,眼见他的大部分进项尚未妥善解决,却要进一步增加家里养马的巨大开支,她觉得很不合理。埃德蒙只是回答说:“范妮必须有一匹马。”诺里斯太太无法接受这样的看法。伯特伦夫人倒能接受,她完全赞成儿子的看法,认为范妮必须有一匹马,并且认为伯特伦爵士也会觉得有这个必要。她只是要求不要性急,只要儿子等托马斯爵士回来,由托马斯爵士亲自定夺这件事。托马斯爵士9月份就要回到家,只不过等到9月又有何妨呢?

埃德蒙生妈妈的气,更生大姨妈的气,怪她最不关心外甥女。不过,他对她的话却不能不有所顾忌,最后决定采取一个办法,既不至于使父亲认为他做得太过分,又可以使范妮有条件立即开始运动。他不能眼看着她没有马骑。他自己有三匹马,但没有一匹是供女士骑的。其中两匹是狩猎用的,另外一匹是拉车用的,他决定用这匹马换一匹表妹可以骑的马。他知道在哪里能找到这样的马,等主意一定,便很快办妥了这件事。新换来的雌马还真是难得,稍加调驯,便服服帖帖地很好驾驭了,于是差不多完全归范妮使唤了。她以前从未想到,还有什么会比那匹老灰马更让她称心如意的,可现在骑上埃德蒙的这匹雌马,真比过去骑老灰马还要快活得多。再一想这快活是表哥的深情厚意给她带来的,心里就越发快活,简直无法用言语来形容。她认为表哥是世界上最善良、最伟大的典范,他的高尚品质只有她最能感受,她对他的感激之情是世界上任何感情都无法比拟的。她对他的感情集万般尊敬、不胜感激、无限信任、满腔柔情于一体。

这匹马不论在名义上还是在事实上都仍然归埃德蒙所有,因而诺里斯太太也能容忍范妮骑下去。至于伯特伦夫人,即使她想起原先曾反对过,也不会怪罪埃德蒙没等到托马斯爵士9月份回来,因为到了9月份,托马斯爵士仍在海外,而且近期内还不可能办完事情。就在他刚开始考虑回国的时候,突然遇到了不利的情况,因为各种事情很难预料,他便决定打发儿子先回家,自己留下做最后的安排。沥姆平安地回来了,告诉大家说父亲在外身体很好,可是诺里斯太太听后并不放心。她觉得托马斯爵士可能预感自己灾难临头,出于父爱的考虑,把儿子送回了家,因此她心里不禁冒出了种种可怕的预感。秋天的黄昏越来越长,在她那寂寞凄凉的小屋里,这些可怕的念头搅得她胆战心惊,只得每天跑到庄园的餐厅里来避难。然而,冬天又有了约会应酬之后,对她倒不无作用。在约会应酬的过程中,她满心欢喜地替大外甥女筹划未来的命运,心神也就平静了许多。“假如可怜的托马斯爵士命中注定永远回不来,现在看到亲爱的玛丽亚能嫁给一个富贵人家,倒也是莫大的安慰,”她经常这样想;而当她们和有钱的男人在一起的时候,尤其是经人介绍了一位刚在乡下继承了一份最大地产、一个最佳职位的年轻人的时候,她更是总要这样想。

拉什沃思先生一见面就被伯特伦小姐的美貌所吸引,加之一心想要成家,很快便认为自己坠人了情网。他是个粗大肥胖、智力平庸的年轻人。不过,由于在身姿体态、言谈举止上并不讨人嫌,伯特伦小姐觉得能博得他的欢心,倒也非常得意。玛丽亚·伯特伦现年二十一岁,开始觉得自己应该结婚了。她若是能嫁给拉什沃思先生,就能享有一笔比她父亲还高的收入,还能确保在伦敦城里有一处宅邸,而这在眼下恰恰是她最为看重的目标。因此,本着同样的道义原则,她显然应该尽可能嫁给拉什沃思先生。诺里斯太太满腔热情地撮合这门亲事,用尽花言巧语,耍尽种种伎俩,想让双方认清彼此是多么般配。她使出了各种招数,其中包括跟拉什沃思先生的母亲套近乎。拉什沃思太太目前就和儿子住在一起,诺里斯太太甚至硬逼着伯特伦夫人一早赶了十英里坎坷的道路去拜访她。没过多久,她和这位太太便情投意合了。拉什沃思太太承认,她盼望儿子能早日结婚,并且宣称,伯特伦小姐和颜悦色,多才多艺,在她见过的年轻小姐中,似乎最为合适,能使她儿子幸福。诺里斯太太接受了这番夸奖,赞许拉什沃思太太真有眼力,对别人的优点能看得这么准。玛丽亚确实是他们大家的骄傲与欢乐——她白玉无瑕——是个天使。当然,追求她的人很多,她难免挑花了眼。不过,要是让她诺里斯太太经过这么短时间的相识就做决定的话,她认为拉什沃思先生恰恰是最配碍上她,也最能使她中意的年轻人。

经过几番舞会结伴跳舞之后,两位年轻人果然像两位太太料想的那样投缘。在照例禀报了远在海外的托马斯爵士之后,双方便订婚了,男女两家都非常满意,附近的局外人也都十分高兴,好多个星期以来,他们一直觉得拉什沃思先生和伯特伦小姐结婚非常合适。

托马斯爵士的答复几个月后才能收到。然而,在此期间,由于大家都认定他会满心喜欢这门亲事,两家人便毫无约束地来往起来,谁也无意保密,只不过诺里斯太太在逢人便讲的时候,最后总要告诫人家现在还不宜张扬。

伯特伦家一家人中,只有埃德蒙看得出这门亲事还有缺陷,不管姨妈再怎么称赞,他都不觉得拉什沃思先生是个理想的伴侣。他承认,妹妹的幸福只有妹妹自己最有数,可他并不赞成她把幸福都押在大笔的收入上。他跟拉什沃思先生在一起的时候,心里情不自禁地在想:“这个人若不是一年有一万两千英镑的收入,说不定是个很蠢的家伙。”

然而,托马斯爵士对于这桩亲事却感到由衷的高兴,因为这门亲事对他家无疑是有利的,再说他从信上获悉的全是好的一面,令人满意的一面。这是一门再合适不过的亲事,两家同在一个地方,又门当户对,于是他以尽可能快的速度,向家里表示竭诚的赞同。他只提出了一个条件,婚礼要等他回来后再举行,因此便再次急巴巴地盼望回归。他是4月份写的信,满心指望能在夏季结束之前将一切事情办妥,离开安提瓜回国。

7月份正当事情发展到这个地步,范妮刚满十八岁的时候,村里的交际场上又增添了格兰特太太的弟弟和妹妹,克劳福德先生和克劳福德小姐,格兰特太太的母亲第二次结婚后生下的两个孩子。两人都是拥有大宗财产的年轻人,儿子在诺福克有许多地产,女儿有两万英镑。他们小时候,姐姐总是非常疼爱他们,但是姐姐出嫁不久,母亲又接着去世了,便把他们交给一个叔叔照管。格兰特太太也不认识这位叔叔,因此后来很少见到弟弟妹妹。他们两人在叔叔家感受到了家庭的温暖。克劳福德将军和克劳福德太太尽管在别的事情上总是意见不相吻合,但在疼爱两个孩子上却是一致的,如果说还有什么不一致的地方,那就是两人各宠爱一个。将军喜欢男孩,克劳福德太太溺爱姑娘。克劳福德太太这一去世,她的被保护人在叔叔家又住了几个月之后,不得不另投一个去处。克劳福德将军是个行为不端的人,他想把情妇带到家里来住,而把侄女赶走。正是由于这个原因,格兰特太太的妹妹才提出要投奔姐姐。此举不仅方便了一方,而且也正合另一方的心意。原来,格兰特太太跟住在乡下无儿无女的太太们已经来往够了,她那心爱的客厅早已摆满了漂亮的家具,还养了不少奇花异草、良种家禽,现在很想家里变个什么花样。因此,妹妹的到来使她非常高兴,她一向喜欢这个妹妹,眼下正希望把妹妹留在身边,直至她嫁人为止。她主要担心的是,一个在伦敦待惯了的年轻女士来曼斯菲尔德就怕过不惯。

克劳福德小姐并非完全没有类似的顾虑,不过她所顾虑的,主要是拿不准姐姐的生活派头和社交格调。她先是劝说哥哥和她一起住到他乡下的宅邸里,哥哥不答应,她才决定硬着头皮去投奔别的亲戚。遗憾的是,亨利·克劳福德非常讨厌始终居住在一个地方,局限于一个社交圈子。他不能为了照顾妹妹而做出这么重大的牺牲,不过他还是极其关切地陪她来到北安普敦,而且痛痛快快地答应,一旦她对这个地方感到厌倦,只要告诉他一声,他半个钟头内就把她带走。

这次会面令双方都很满意。克劳福德小姐看到姐姐既不刻板,也不土气——姐夫看上去也还体面,住宅宽敞,陈设齐全。格兰特太太看到她越发疼爱的两位年轻人,仪表着实讨人喜欢。玛丽·克劳福德长得异常俏丽,亨利虽然算不上英俊,但却挺有风度,富于表情。两人的仪态活泼有趣,格兰特太太顿时觉得他们样样都好。她对两人都喜欢,但尤其喜欢玛丽。她从来没能为自己的美貌而自豪,现在却能为妹妹的美貌而骄傲,真让她打心底里高兴。还没等妹妹到来,她就给她物色对象了。她看中了汤姆·伯特伦。一个姑娘拥有两万英镑,而且照格兰特太太看来又那么文雅、那么多才多艺,完全配得上一个男爵的大公子。格兰特太太是个心直口快的热心肠人,玛丽来了还不到三个小时,她就把她的打算告诉了她。

克劳福德小姐听说有这么高贵的一家人家离他们这么近,感到甚为高兴,而她姐姐这么早就为她操心,还给她选择了这么个对象,也都丝毫没有引起她的不快。结婚是她的目标,只要能嫁个称心的人家就行。她在伦敦见过伯特伦先生,知道他的相貌和家庭条件一样,都没有什么可挑剔的。因此,尽管她把姐姐的话当笑话来听,但她还是记住要认真考虑一番。没过多久,格兰特太太又把这个主意告诉了亨利。

“我想到了一个主意,”格兰特太太进一步说道,“能使这件事十全十美。我真想把你们两个都安置在这一带,因此,亨利,我要你娶伯特伦家的二小姐,这姑娘可爱、漂亮、脾气好、有才艺,准能使你非常幸福。”

亨利鞠了个躬,向她道谢。

“亲爱的姐姐,”玛丽说,“你要是能劝说他做出这样的事,使我能与这么聪明的人结成姑嫂,那对我来说可是一件从未有过的快事,不过唯一遗憾的是,你手里没有五六个闺女供你差遣呀。你要想说服亨利结婚,非得有法国女人的口才不可。英国人的全部能耐都已试过了。我有三个眼光很高的朋友先后都迷上了他,她们几个,她们的母亲(都是非常聪明的女人),加上我亲爱的婶婶和我本人,都在煞费苦心地劝他、哄他、诱他结婚,究竟费了多大的劲,你想都想不到啊!你尽可以想象他是个最可怕的调情能手。要是伯特伦家的两位小姐不愿意肠断心碎,就让她们躲开亨利。”

“亲爱的弟弟,我不相信你会这样。”

“是呀,我想你肯定不会相信。你比玛丽来得厚道。你能体谅缺乏经验的年轻人遇事顾虑重重。我生性谨慎,不愿匆匆忙忙地拿自己的幸福冒险。谁也不像我这样看重婚姻。我认为,能有个妻子的福气,正如诗人措辞谨慎的诗句所描写的那样:‘上天最后赐予的最好的礼物’。”①(译者注:①引自弥尔顿《失乐园》第五部第十九行。)

“你瞧,格兰特太太,他多会玩弄字眼,只要看看他嬉皮笑脸的样子。我跟你说吧,他真令人可憎——将军的教育把他宠坏了。”

“年轻人在婚姻问题上怎么说,”格兰特太太说,“我才不当回事儿呢。如果他们扬言不愿意结婚,我只是权当他们没找到合适的对象。”

格兰特博士笑哈哈地赞赏克劳福德小姐自己没有立意不结婚。

“噢!是呀,我丝毫不觉得结婚有什么不好意思的。我愿意让每个人都结婚,只要办得妥当。我不喜欢人们草率从事,不管什么人,什么时候结婚好,就什么时候结婚。”


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 nominally a449bd0900819694017a87f9891f2cff     
在名义上,表面地; 应名儿
参考例句:
  • Dad, nominally a Methodist, entered Churches only for weddings and funerals. 爸名义上是卫理公会教徒,可只去教堂参加婚礼和葬礼。
  • The company could not indicate a person even nominally responsible for staff training. 该公司甚至不能指出一个名义上负责职员培训的人。
2 carving 5wezxw     
n.雕刻品,雕花
参考例句:
  • All the furniture in the room had much carving.房间里所有的家具上都有许多雕刻。
  • He acquired the craft of wood carving in his native town.他在老家学会了木雕手艺。
3 steward uUtzw     
n.乘务员,服务员;看管人;膳食管理员
参考例句:
  • He's the steward of the club.他是这家俱乐部的管理员。
  • He went around the world as a ship's steward.他当客船服务员,到过世界各地。
4 fatigue PhVzV     
n.疲劳,劳累
参考例句:
  • The old lady can't bear the fatigue of a long journey.这位老妇人不能忍受长途旅行的疲劳。
  • I have got over my weakness and fatigue.我已从虚弱和疲劳中恢复过来了。
5 exertion F7Fyi     
n.尽力,努力
参考例句:
  • We were sweating profusely from the exertion of moving the furniture.我们搬动家具大费气力,累得大汗淋漓。
  • She was hot and breathless from the exertion of cycling uphill.由于用力骑车爬坡,她浑身发热。
6 favourable favourable     
adj.赞成的,称赞的,有利的,良好的,顺利的
参考例句:
  • The company will lend you money on very favourable terms.这家公司将以非常优惠的条件借钱给你。
  • We found that most people are favourable to the idea.我们发现大多数人同意这个意见。
7 catastrophe WXHzr     
n.大灾难,大祸
参考例句:
  • I owe it to you that I survived the catastrophe.亏得你我才大难不死。
  • This is a catastrophe beyond human control.这是一场人类无法控制的灾难。
8 agitation TN0zi     
n.搅动;搅拌;鼓动,煽动
参考例句:
  • Small shopkeepers carried on a long agitation against the big department stores.小店主们长期以来一直在煽动人们反对大型百货商店。
  • These materials require constant agitation to keep them in suspension.这些药剂要经常搅动以保持悬浮状态。
9 perfectly 8Mzxb     
adv.完美地,无可非议地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The witnesses were each perfectly certain of what they said.证人们个个对自己所说的话十分肯定。
  • Everything that we're doing is all perfectly above board.我们做的每件事情都是光明正大的。
10 accomplishments 1c15077db46e4d6425b6f78720939d54     
n.造诣;完成( accomplishment的名词复数 );技能;成绩;成就
参考例句:
  • It was one of the President's greatest accomplishments. 那是总统最伟大的成就之一。
  • Among her accomplishments were sewing,cooking,playing the piano and dancing. 她的才能包括缝纫、烹调、弹钢琴和跳舞。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
11 wasteful ogdwu     
adj.(造成)浪费的,挥霍的
参考例句:
  • It is a shame to be so wasteful.这样浪费太可惜了。
  • Duties have been reassigned to avoid wasteful duplication of work.为避免重复劳动浪费资源,任务已经重新分派。
12 fully Gfuzd     
adv.完全地,全部地,彻底地;充分地
参考例句:
  • The doctor asked me to breathe in,then to breathe out fully.医生让我先吸气,然后全部呼出。
  • They soon became fully integrated into the local community.他们很快就完全融入了当地人的圈子。
13 belles 35634a17dac7d7e83a3c14948372f50e     
n.美女( belle的名词复数 );最美的美女
参考例句:
  • Every girl in Atlanta was knee deep in men,even the plainest girls were carrying on like belles. 亚特兰大的女孩子个个都有许多男人追求,就连最不出色的也像美人一样被男人紧紧缠住。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Even lot of belles, remand me next the United States! 还要很多美女,然后把我送回美国! 来自互联网
14 possessed xuyyQ     
adj.疯狂的;拥有的,占有的
参考例句:
  • He flew out of the room like a man possessed.他像着了魔似地猛然冲出房门。
  • He behaved like someone possessed.他行为举止像是魔怔了。
15 admiration afpyA     
n.钦佩,赞美,羡慕
参考例句:
  • He was lost in admiration of the beauty of the scene.他对风景之美赞不绝口。
  • We have a great admiration for the gold medalists.我们对金牌获得者极为敬佩。
16 enjoyment opaxV     
n.乐趣;享有;享用
参考例句:
  • Your company adds to the enjoyment of our visit. 有您的陪同,我们这次访问更加愉快了。
  • After each joke the old man cackled his enjoyment.每逢讲完一个笑话,这老人就呵呵笑着表示他的高兴。
17 honourable honourable     
adj.可敬的;荣誉的,光荣的
参考例句:
  • I don't think I am worthy of such an honourable title.这样的光荣称号,我可担当不起。
  • I hope to find an honourable way of settling difficulties.我希望设法找到一个体面的办法以摆脱困境。
18 thoroughly sgmz0J     
adv.完全地,彻底地,十足地
参考例句:
  • The soil must be thoroughly turned over before planting.一定要先把土地深翻一遍再下种。
  • The soldiers have been thoroughly instructed in the care of their weapons.士兵们都系统地接受过保护武器的训练。
19 relished c700682884b4734d455673bc9e66a90c     
v.欣赏( relish的过去式和过去分词 );从…获得乐趣;渴望
参考例句:
  • The chaplain relished the privacy and isolation of his verdant surroundings. 牧师十分欣赏他那苍翠的环境所具有的幽雅恬静,与世隔绝的气氛。 来自辞典例句
  • Dalleson relished the first portion of the work before him. 达尔生对眼前这工作的前半部分满有兴趣。 来自辞典例句
20 avowedly 22a8f7113a6a07f0e70ce2acc52ecdfa     
adv.公然地
参考例句:
  • He was avowedly in the wrong. 他自认错了。 来自辞典例句
  • Their policy has been avowedly marxist. 他们的政策被公开地宣称为马克思主义政策。 来自互联网
21 tranquillity 93810b1103b798d7e55e2b944bcb2f2b     
n. 平静, 安静
参考例句:
  • The phenomenon was so striking and disturbing that his philosophical tranquillity vanished. 这个令人惶惑不安的现象,扰乱了他的旷达宁静的心境。
  • My value for domestic tranquillity should much exceed theirs. 我应该远比他们重视家庭的平静生活。
22 embarrassments 5f3d5ecce4738cceef5dce99a8a6434a     
n.尴尬( embarrassment的名词复数 );难堪;局促不安;令人难堪或耻辱的事
参考例句:
  • But there have been many embarrassments along the way. 但是一路走来已经是窘境不断。 来自互联网
  • The embarrassments don't stop there. 让人难受的事情还没完。 来自互联网
23 pony Au5yJ     
adj.小型的;n.小马
参考例句:
  • His father gave him a pony as a Christmas present.他父亲给了他一匹小马驹作为圣诞礼物。
  • They made him pony up the money he owed.他们逼他还债。
24 situated JiYzBH     
adj.坐落在...的,处于某种境地的
参考例句:
  • The village is situated at the margin of a forest.村子位于森林的边缘。
  • She is awkwardly situated.她的处境困难。
25 resolute 2sCyu     
adj.坚决的,果敢的
参考例句:
  • He was resolute in carrying out his plan.他坚决地实行他的计划。
  • The Egyptians offered resolute resistance to the aggressors.埃及人对侵略者作出坚决的反抗。
26 improper b9txi     
adj.不适当的,不合适的,不正确的,不合礼仪的
参考例句:
  • Short trousers are improper at a dance.舞会上穿短裤不成体统。
  • Laughing and joking are improper at a funeral.葬礼时大笑和开玩笑是不合适的。
27 entirely entirely     
ad.全部地,完整地;完全地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The fire was entirely caused by their neglect of duty. 那场火灾完全是由于他们失职而引起的。
  • His life was entirely given up to the educational work. 他的一生统统献给了教育工作。
28 displeased 1uFz5L     
a.不快的
参考例句:
  • The old man was displeased and darted an angry look at me. 老人不高兴了,瞪了我一眼。
  • He was displeased about the whole affair. 他对整个事情感到很不高兴。
29 determined duszmP     
adj.坚定的;有决心的
参考例句:
  • I have determined on going to Tibet after graduation.我已决定毕业后去西藏。
  • He determined to view the rooms behind the office.他决定查看一下办公室后面的房间。
30 proceeding Vktzvu     
n.行动,进行,(pl.)会议录,学报
参考例句:
  • This train is now proceeding from Paris to London.这次列车从巴黎开往伦敦。
  • The work is proceeding briskly.工作很有生气地进展着。
31 obviate 10Oy4     
v.除去,排除,避免,预防
参考例句:
  • Improved public transportation would obviate the need tor everyone to have their own car.公共交通的改善消除了每人都要有车的必要性。
  • This deferral would obviate pressure on the rouble exchange rate.这一延期将消除卢布汇率面临的压力。
32 procure A1GzN     
vt.获得,取得,促成;vi.拉皮条
参考例句:
  • Can you procure some specimens for me?你能替我弄到一些标本吗?
  • I'll try my best to procure you that original French novel.我将尽全力给你搞到那本原版法国小说。
33 immediate aapxh     
adj.立即的;直接的,最接近的;紧靠的
参考例句:
  • His immediate neighbours felt it their duty to call.他的近邻认为他们有责任去拜访。
  • We declared ourselves for the immediate convocation of the meeting.我们主张立即召开这个会议。
34 mare Y24y3     
n.母马,母驴
参考例句:
  • The mare has just thrown a foal in the stable.那匹母马刚刚在马厩里产下了一只小马驹。
  • The mare foundered under the heavy load and collapsed in the road.那母马因负载过重而倒在路上。
35 gratitude p6wyS     
adj.感激,感谢
参考例句:
  • I have expressed the depth of my gratitude to him.我向他表示了深切的谢意。
  • She could not help her tears of gratitude rolling down her face.她感激的泪珠禁不住沿着面颊流了下来。
36 confiding e67d6a06e1cdfe51bc27946689f784d1     
adj.相信人的,易于相信的v.吐露(秘密,心事等)( confide的现在分词 );(向某人)吐露(隐私、秘密等)
参考例句:
  • The girl is of a confiding nature. 这女孩具有轻信别人的性格。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
  • Celia, though confiding her opinion only to Andrew, disagreed. 西莉亚却不这么看,尽管她只向安德鲁吐露过。 来自辞典例句
37 prospect P01zn     
n.前景,前途;景色,视野
参考例句:
  • This state of things holds out a cheerful prospect.事态呈现出可喜的前景。
  • The prospect became more evident.前景变得更加明朗了。
38 uncertainty NlFwK     
n.易变,靠不住,不确知,不确定的事物
参考例句:
  • Her comments will add to the uncertainty of the situation.她的批评将会使局势更加不稳定。
  • After six weeks of uncertainty,the strain was beginning to take its toll.6个星期的忐忑不安后,压力开始产生影响了。
39 presentiments 94142b6676e2096d7e26ee0241976c93     
n.(对不祥事物的)预感( presentiment的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • His presentiments of what the future holds for all are plainly not cheering. 则是应和了很多美国人的种种担心,他对各方未来的预感显然是不令人振奋的。 来自互联网
40 solitariness 02b546c5b9162b2dd5727eb373f1669b     
n.隐居;单独
参考例句:
41 eldest bqkx6     
adj.最年长的,最年老的
参考例句:
  • The King's eldest son is the heir to the throne.国王的长子是王位的继承人。
  • The castle and the land are entailed on the eldest son.城堡和土地限定由长子继承。
42 zealous 0MOzS     
adj.狂热的,热心的
参考例句:
  • She made zealous efforts to clean up the classroom.她非常热心地努力清扫教室。
  • She is a zealous supporter of our cause.她是我们事业的热心支持者。
43 intimacy z4Vxx     
n.熟悉,亲密,密切关系,亲昵的言行
参考例句:
  • His claims to an intimacy with the President are somewhat exaggerated.他声称自己与总统关系密切,这有点言过其实。
  • I wish there were a rule book for intimacy.我希望能有个关于亲密的规则。
44 amiable hxAzZ     
adj.和蔼可亲的,友善的,亲切的
参考例句:
  • She was a very kind and amiable old woman.她是个善良和气的老太太。
  • We have a very amiable companionship.我们之间存在一种友好的关系。
45 precisely zlWzUb     
adv.恰好,正好,精确地,细致地
参考例句:
  • It's precisely that sort of slick sales-talk that I mistrust.我不相信的正是那种油腔滑调的推销宣传。
  • The man adjusted very precisely.那个人调得很准。
46 justified 7pSzrk     
a.正当的,有理的
参考例句:
  • She felt fully justified in asking for her money back. 她认为有充分的理由要求退款。
  • The prisoner has certainly justified his claims by his actions. 那个囚犯确实已用自己的行动表明他的要求是正当的。
47 expediency XhLzi     
n.适宜;方便;合算;利己
参考例句:
  • The government is torn between principle and expediency. 政府在原则与权宜之间难于抉择。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • It was difficult to strike the right balance between justice and expediency. 在公正与私利之间很难两全。 来自辞典例句
48 intercourse NbMzU     
n.性交;交流,交往,交际
参考例句:
  • The magazine becomes a cultural medium of intercourse between the two peoples.该杂志成为两民族间文化交流的媒介。
  • There was close intercourse between them.他们过往很密。
49 secrecy NZbxH     
n.秘密,保密,隐蔽
参考例句:
  • All the researchers on the project are sworn to secrecy.该项目的所有研究人员都按要求起誓保守秘密。
  • Complete secrecy surrounded the meeting.会议在绝对机密的环境中进行。
50 advantageous BK5yp     
adj.有利的;有帮助的
参考例句:
  • Injections of vitamin C are obviously advantageous.注射维生素C显然是有利的。
  • You're in a very advantageous position.你处于非常有利的地位。
51 hearty Od1zn     
adj.热情友好的;衷心的;尽情的,纵情的
参考例句:
  • After work they made a hearty meal in the worker's canteen.工作完了,他们在工人食堂饱餐了一顿。
  • We accorded him a hearty welcome.我们给他热忱的欢迎。
52 concurrence InAyF     
n.同意;并发
参考例句:
  • There is a concurrence of opinion between them.他们的想法一致。
  • The concurrence of their disappearances had to be more than coincidental.他们同时失踪肯定不仅仅是巧合。
53 adverse 5xBzs     
adj.不利的;有害的;敌对的,不友好的
参考例句:
  • He is adverse to going abroad.他反对出国。
  • The improper use of medicine could lead to severe adverse reactions.用药不当会产生严重的不良反应。
54 expedient 1hYzh     
adj.有用的,有利的;n.紧急的办法,权宜之计
参考例句:
  • The government found it expedient to relax censorship a little.政府发现略微放宽审查是可取的。
  • Every kind of expedient was devised by our friends.我们的朋友想出了各种各样的应急办法。
55 sitting-room sitting-room     
n.(BrE)客厅,起居室
参考例句:
  • The sitting-room is clean.起居室很清洁。
  • Each villa has a separate sitting-room.每栋别墅都有一间独立的起居室。
56 apprehensions 86177204327b157a6d884cdb536098d8     
疑惧
参考例句:
  • He stood in a mixture of desire and apprehensions. 他怀着渴望和恐惧交加的心情伫立着。
  • But subsequent cases have removed many of these apprehensions. 然而,随后的案例又消除了许多类似的忧虑。
57 abode hIby0     
n.住处,住所
参考例句:
  • It was ten months before my father discovered his abode.父亲花了十个月的功夫,才好不容易打听到他的住处。
  • Welcome to our humble abode!欢迎光临寒舍!
58 rusticity 9b505aa76fd81d5264f3b162e556f320     
n.乡村的特点、风格或气息
参考例句:
  • He was ashamed of his own rusticity in that distinguished company. 在那伙人当中他因自己粗俗而惭愧。 来自辞典例句
  • There is an important difference between rusticity and urbanity. 朴实和文雅之间有很大的差别。 来自互联网
59 commodious aXCyr     
adj.宽敞的;使用方便的
参考例句:
  • It was a commodious and a diverting life.这是一种自由自在,令人赏心悦目的生活。
  • Their habitation was not merely respectable and commodious,but even dignified and imposing.他们的居所既宽敞舒适又尊严气派。
60 remarkably EkPzTW     
ad.不同寻常地,相当地
参考例句:
  • I thought she was remarkably restrained in the circumstances. 我认为她在那种情况下非常克制。
  • He made a remarkably swift recovery. 他康复得相当快。
61 countenance iztxc     
n.脸色,面容;面部表情;vt.支持,赞同
参考例句:
  • At the sight of this photograph he changed his countenance.他一看见这张照片脸色就变了。
  • I made a fierce countenance as if I would eat him alive.我脸色恶狠狠地,仿佛要把他活生生地吞下去。
62 fixed JsKzzj     
adj.固定的,不变的,准备好的;(计算机)固定的
参考例句:
  • Have you two fixed on a date for the wedding yet?你们俩选定婚期了吗?
  • Once the aim is fixed,we should not change it arbitrarily.目标一旦确定,我们就不应该随意改变。
63 elegance QjPzj     
n.优雅;优美,雅致;精致,巧妙
参考例句:
  • The furnishings in the room imparted an air of elegance.这个房间的家具带给这房间一种优雅的气氛。
  • John has been known for his sartorial elegance.约翰因为衣着讲究而出名。
64 accomplished UzwztZ     
adj.有才艺的;有造诣的;达到了的
参考例句:
  • Thanks to your help,we accomplished the task ahead of schedule.亏得你们帮忙,我们才提前完成了任务。
  • Removal of excess heat is accomplished by means of a radiator.通过散热器完成多余热量的排出。
65 allied iLtys     
adj.协约国的;同盟国的
参考例句:
  • Britain was allied with the United States many times in history.历史上英国曾多次与美国结盟。
  • Allied forces sustained heavy losses in the first few weeks of the campaign.同盟国在最初几周内遭受了巨大的损失。
66 coax Fqmz5     
v.哄诱,劝诱,用诱哄得到,诱取
参考例句:
  • I had to coax the information out of him.我得用好话套出他掌握的情况。
  • He tried to coax the secret from me.他试图哄骗我说出秘方。
67 flirt zgwzA     
v.调情,挑逗,调戏;n.调情者,卖俏者
参考例句:
  • He used to flirt with every girl he met.过去他总是看到一个姑娘便跟她调情。
  • He watched the stranger flirt with his girlfriend and got fighting mad.看着那个陌生人和他女朋友调情,他都要抓狂了。
68 unwilling CjpwB     
adj.不情愿的
参考例句:
  • The natives were unwilling to be bent by colonial power.土著居民不愿受殖民势力的摆布。
  • His tightfisted employer was unwilling to give him a raise.他那吝啬的雇主不肯给他加薪。
69 blessing UxDztJ     
n.祈神赐福;祷告;祝福,祝愿
参考例句:
  • The blessing was said in Hebrew.祷告用了希伯来语。
  • A double blessing has descended upon the house.双喜临门。
70 discreet xZezn     
adj.(言行)谨慎的;慎重的;有判断力的
参考例句:
  • He is very discreet in giving his opinions.发表意见他十分慎重。
  • It wasn't discreet of you to ring me up at the office.你打电话到我办公室真是太鲁莽了。
71 profess iQHxU     
v.声称,冒称,以...为业,正式接受入教,表明信仰
参考例句:
  • I profess that I was surprised at the news.我承认这消息使我惊讶。
  • What religion does he profess?他信仰哪种宗教?


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