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Chapter 19
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How is the consternation1 of the party to be described? To the greater number it was a moment of absolute horror. Sir Thomas in the house! All felt the instantaneous conviction. Not a hope of imposition or mistake was harboured anywhere. Julia's looks were an evidence of the fact that made it indisputable; and after the first starts and exclamations2, not a word was spoken for half a minute: each with an altered countenance4 was looking at some other, and almost each was feeling it a stroke the most unwelcome, most ill-timed, most appalling5! Mr. Yates might consider it only as a vexatious interruption for the evening, and Mr. Rushworth might imagine it a blessing6; but every other heart was sinking under some degree of self-condemnation or undefined alarm, every other heart was suggesting, "What will become of us? what is to be done now?" It was a terrible pause; and terrible to every ear were the corroborating7 sounds of opening doors and passing footsteps.

Julia was the first to move and speak again. Jealousy8 and bitterness had been suspended: selfishness was lost in the common cause; but at the moment of her appearance, Frederick was listening with looks of devotion to Agatha's narrative9, and pressing her hand to his heart; and as soon as she could notice this, and see that, in spite of the shock of her words, he still kept his station and retained her sister's hand, her wounded heart swelled10 again with injury, and looking as red as she had been white before, she turned out of the room, saying, "_I_ need not be afraid of appearing before him."

Her going roused the rest; and at the same moment the two brothers stepped forward, feeling the necessity of doing something. A very few words between them were sufficient. The case admitted no difference of opinion: they must go to the drawing-room directly. Maria joined them with the same intent, just then the stoutest12 of the three; for the very circumstance which had driven Julia away was to her the sweetest support. Henry Crawford's retaining her hand at such a moment, a moment of such peculiar13 proof and importance, was worth ages of doubt and anxiety. She hailed it as an earnest of the most serious determination, and was equal even to encounter her father. They walked off, utterly14 heedless of Mr. Rushworth's repeated question of, "Shall I go too? Had not I better go too? Will not it be right for me to go too?" but they were no sooner through the door than Henry Crawford undertook to answer the anxious inquiry15, and, encouraging him by all means to pay his respects to Sir Thomas without delay, sent him after the others with delighted haste.

Fanny was left with only the Crawfords and Mr. Yates. She had been quite overlooked by her cousins; and as her own opinion of her claims on Sir Thomas's affection was much too humble16 to give her any idea of classing herself with his children, she was glad to remain behind and gain a little breathing-time. Her agitation17 and alarm exceeded all that was endured by the rest, by the right of a disposition18 which not even innocence19 could keep from suffering. She was nearly fainting: all her former habitual20 dread21 of her uncle was returning, and with it compassion22 for him and for almost every one of the party on the development before him, with solicitude23 on Edmund's account indescribable. She had found a seat, where in excessive trembling she was enduring all these fearful thoughts, while the other three, no longer under any restraint, were giving vent24 to their feelings of vexation, lamenting25 over such an unlooked-for premature26 arrival as a most untoward27 event, and without mercy wishing poor Sir Thomas had been twice as long on his passage, or were still in Antigua.

The Crawfords were more warm on the subject than Mr. Yates, from better understanding the family, and judging more clearly of the mischief28 that must ensue. The ruin of the play was to them a certainty: they felt the total destruction of the scheme to be inevitably29 at hand; while Mr. Yates considered it only as a temporary interruption, a disaster for the evening, and could even suggest the possibility of the rehearsal30 being renewed after tea, when the bustle31 of receiving Sir Thomas were over, and he might be at leisure to be amused by it. The Crawfords laughed at the idea; and having soon agreed on the propriety32 of their walking quietly home and leaving the family to themselves, proposed Mr. Yates's accompanying them and spending the evening at the Parsonage. But Mr. Yates, having never been with those who thought much of parental33 claims, or family confidence, could not perceive that anything of the kind was necessary; and therefore, thanking them, said, "he preferred remaining where he was, that he might pay his respects to the old gentleman handsomely since he _was_ come; and besides, he did not think it would be fair by the others to have everybody run away."

Fanny was just beginning to collect herself, and to feel that if she staid longer behind it might seem disrespectful, when this point was settled, and being commissioned with the brother and sister's apology, saw them preparing to go as she quitted the room herself to perform the dreadful duty of appearing before her uncle.

Too soon did she find herself at the drawing-room door; and after pausing a moment for what she knew would not come, for a courage which the outside of no door had ever supplied to her, she turned the lock in desperation, and the lights of the drawing-room, and all the collected family, were before her. As she entered, her own name caught her ear. Sir Thomas was at that moment looking round him, and saying, "But where is Fanny? Why do not I see my little Fanny?"--and on perceiving her, came forward with a kindness which astonished and penetrated34 her, calling her his dear Fanny, kissing her affectionately, and observing with decided35 pleasure how much she was grown! Fanny knew not how to feel, nor where to look. She was quite oppressed. He had never been so kind, so _very_ kind to her in his life. His manner seemed changed, his voice was quick from the agitation of joy; and all that had been awful in his dignity seemed lost in tenderness. He led her nearer the light and looked at her again-- inquired particularly after her health, and then, correcting himself, observed that he need not inquire, for her appearance spoke3 sufficiently36 on that point. A fine blush having succeeded the previous paleness of her face, he was justified37 in his belief of her equal improvement in health and beauty. He inquired next after her family, especially William: and his kindness altogether was such as made her reproach herself for loving him so little, and thinking his return a misfortune; and when, on having courage to lift her eyes to his face, she saw that he was grown thinner, and had the burnt, fagged, worn look of fatigue38 and a hot climate, every tender feeling was increased, and she was miserable39 in considering how much unsuspected vexation was probably ready to burst on him.

Sir Thomas was indeed the life of the party, who at his suggestion now seated themselves round the fire. He had the best right to be the talker; and the delight of his sensations in being again in his own house, in the centre of his family, after such a separation, made him communicative and chatty in a very unusual degree; and he was ready to give every information as to his voyage, and answer every question of his two sons almost before it was put. His business in Antigua had latterly been prosperously rapid, and he came directly from Liverpool, having had an opportunity of making his passage thither40 in a private vessel41, instead of waiting for the packet; and all the little particulars of his proceedings43 and events, his arrivals and departures, were most promptly44 delivered, as he sat by Lady Bertram and looked with heartfelt satisfaction on the faces around him--interrupting himself more than once, however, to remark on his good fortune in finding them all at home--coming unexpectedly as he did-- all collected together exactly as he could have wished, but dared not depend on. Mr. Rushworth was not forgotten: a most friendly reception and warmth of hand-shaking had already met him, and with pointed45 attention he was now included in the objects most intimately connected with Mansfield. There was nothing disagreeable in Mr. Rushworth's appearance, and Sir Thomas was liking46 him already.

By not one of the circle was he listened to with such unbroken, unalloyed enjoyment47 as by his wife, who was really extremely happy to see him, and whose feelings were so warmed by his sudden arrival as to place her nearer agitation than she had been for the last twenty years. She had been _almost_ fluttered for a few minutes, and still remained so sensibly animated48 as to put away her work, move Pug from her side, and give all her attention and all the rest of her sofa to her husband. She had no anxieties for anybody to cloud _her_ pleasure: her own time had been irreproachably49 spent during his absence: she had done a great deal of carpet-work, and made many yards of fringe; and she would have answered as freely for the good conduct and useful pursuits of all the young people as for her own. It was so agreeable to her to see him again, and hear him talk, to have her ear amused and her whole comprehension filled by his narratives50, that she began particularly to feel how dreadfully she must have missed him, and how impossible it would have been for her to bear a lengthened51 absence.

Mrs. Norris was by no means to be compared in happiness to her sister. Not that _she_ was incommoded by many fears of Sir Thomas's disapprobation when the present state of his house should be known, for her judgment53 had been so blinded that, except by the instinctive54 caution with which she had whisked away Mr. Rushworth's pink satin cloak as her brother-in-law entered, she could hardly be said to shew any sign of alarm; but she was vexed55 by the _manner_ of his return. It had left her nothing to do. Instead of being sent for out of the room, and seeing him first, and having to spread the happy news through the house, Sir Thomas, with a very reasonable dependence56, perhaps, on the nerves of his wife and children, had sought no confidant but the butler, and had been following him almost instantaneously into the drawing-room. Mrs. Norris felt herself defrauded57 of an office on which she had always depended, whether his arrival or his death were to be the thing unfolded; and was now trying to be in a bustle without having anything to bustle about, and labouring to be important where nothing was wanted but tranquillity58 and silence. Would Sir Thomas have consented to eat, she might have gone to the housekeeper59 with troublesome directions, and insulted the footmen with injunctions of despatch60; but Sir Thomas resolutely61 declined all dinner: he would take nothing, nothing till tea came--he would rather wait for tea. Still Mrs. Norris was at intervals62 urging something different; and in the most interesting moment of his passage to England, when the alarm of a French privateer was at the height, she burst through his recital63 with the proposal of soup. "Sure, my dear Sir Thomas, a basin of soup would be a much better thing for you than tea. Do have a basin of soup."

Sir Thomas could not be provoked. "Still the same anxiety for everybody's comfort, my dear Mrs. Norris," was his answer. "But indeed I would rather have nothing but tea."

"Well, then, Lady Bertram, suppose you speak for tea directly; suppose you hurry Baddeley a little; he seems behindhand to-night." She carried this point, and Sir Thomas's narrative proceeded.

At length there was a pause. His immediate64 communications were exhausted65, and it seemed enough to be looking joyfully66 around him, now at one, now at another of the beloved circle; but the pause was not long: in the elation67 of her spirits Lady Bertram became talkative, and what were the sensations of her children upon hearing her say, "How do you think the young people have been amusing themselves lately, Sir Thomas? They have been acting68. We have been all alive with acting."

"Indeed! and what have you been acting?"

"Oh! they'll tell you all about it."

"The _all_ will soon be told," cried Tom hastily, and with affected69 unconcern; "but it is not worth while to bore my father with it now. You will hear enough of it to-morrow, sir. We have just been trying, by way of doing something, and amusing my mother, just within the last week, to get up a few scenes, a mere70 trifle. We have had such incessant71 rains almost since October began, that we have been nearly confined to the house for days together. I have hardly taken out a gun since the 3rd. Tolerable sport the first three days, but there has been no attempting anything since. The first day I went over Mansfield Wood, and Edmund took the copses beyond Easton, and we brought home six brace72 between us, and might each have killed six times as many, but we respect your pheasants, sir, I assure you, as much as you could desire. I do not think you will find your woods by any means worse stocked than they were. _I_ never saw Mansfield Wood so full of pheasants in my life as this year. I hope you will take a day's sport there yourself, sir, soon."

For the present the danger was over, and Fanny's sick feelings subsided73; but when tea was soon afterwards brought in, and Sir Thomas, getting up, said that he found that he could not be any longer in the house without just looking into his own dear room, every agitation was returning. He was gone before anything had been said to prepare him for the change he must find there; and a pause of alarm followed his disappearance74. Edmund was the first to speak--

"Something must be done," said he.

"It is time to think of our visitors," said Maria, still feeling her hand pressed to Henry Crawford's heart, and caring little for anything else. "Where did you leave Miss Crawford, Fanny?"

Fanny told of their departure, and delivered their message.

"Then poor Yates is all alone," cried Tom. "I will go and fetch him. He will be no bad assistant when it all comes out."

To the theatre he went, and reached it just in time to witness the first meeting of his father and his friend. Sir Thomas had been a good deal surprised to find candles burning in his room; and on casting his eye round it, to see other symptoms of recent habitation and a general air of confusion in the furniture. The removal of the bookcase from before the billiard-room door struck him especially, but he had scarcely more than time to feel astonished at all this, before there were sounds from the billiard-room to astonish him still farther. Some one was talking there in a very loud accent; he did not know the voice--more than talking--almost hallooing. He stepped to the door, rejoicing at that moment in having the means of immediate communication, and, opening it, found himself on the stage of a theatre, and opposed to a ranting75 young man, who appeared likely to knock him down backwards76. At the very moment of Yates perceiving Sir Thomas, and giving perhaps the very best start he had ever given in the whole course of his rehearsals77, Tom Bertram entered at the other end of the room; and never had he found greater difficulty in keeping his countenance. His father's looks of solemnity and amazement78 on this his first appearance on any stage, and the gradual metamorphosis of the impassioned Baron79 Wildenheim into the well-bred and easy Mr. Yates, making his bow and apology to Sir Thomas Bertram, was such an exhibition, such a piece of true acting, as he would not have lost upon any account. It would be the last-- in all probability--the last scene on that stage; but he was sure there could not be a finer. The house would close with the greatest eclat80.

There was little time, however, for the indulgence of any images of merriment. It was necessary for him to step forward, too, and assist the introduction, and with many awkward sensations he did his best. Sir Thomas received Mr. Yates with all the appearance of cordiality which was due to his own character, but was really as far from pleased with the necessity of the acquaintance as with the manner of its commencement. Mr. Yates's family and connexions were sufficiently known to him to render his introduction as the "particular friend," another of the hundred particular friends of his son, exceedingly unwelcome; and it needed all the felicity of being again at home, and all the forbearance it could supply, to save Sir Thomas from anger on finding himself thus bewildered in his own house, making part of a ridiculous exhibition in the midst of theatrical81 nonsense, and forced in so untoward a moment to admit the acquaintance of a young man whom he felt sure of disapproving82, and whose easy indifference83 and volubility in the course of the first five minutes seemed to mark him the most at home of the two.

Tom understood his father's thoughts, and heartily84 wishing he might be always as well disposed to give them but partial expression, began to see, more clearly than he had ever done before, that there might be some ground of offence, that there might be some reason for the glance his father gave towards the ceiling and stucco of the room; and that when he inquired with mild gravity after the fate of the billiard-table, he was not proceeding42 beyond a very allowable curiosity. A few minutes were enough for such unsatisfactory sensations on each side; and Sir Thomas having exerted himself so far as to speak a few words of calm approbation52 in reply to an eager appeal of Mr. Yates, as to the happiness of the arrangement, the three gentlemen returned to the drawing-room together, Sir Thomas with an increase of gravity which was not lost on all.

"I come from your theatre," said he composedly, as he sat down; "I found myself in it rather unexpectedly. Its vicinity to my own room--but in every respect, indeed, it took me by surprise, as I had not the smallest suspicion of your acting having assumed so serious a character. It appears a neat job, however, as far as I could judge by candlelight, and does my friend Christopher Jackson credit." And then he would have changed the subject, and sipped85 his coffee in peace over domestic matters of a calmer hue86; but Mr. Yates, without discernment to catch Sir Thomas's meaning, or diffidence, or delicacy87, or discretion88 enough to allow him to lead the discourse89 while he mingled90 among the others with the least obtrusiveness91 himself, would keep him on the topic of the theatre, would torment92 him with questions and remarks relative to it, and finally would make him hear the whole history of his disappointment at Ecclesford. Sir Thomas listened most politely, but found much to offend his ideas of decorum, and confirm his ill-opinion of Mr. Yates's habits of thinking, from the beginning to the end of the story; and when it was over, could give him no other assurance of sympathy than what a slight bow conveyed.

"This was, in fact, the origin of _our_ acting," said Tom, after a moment's thought. "My friend Yates brought the infection from Ecclesford, and it spread--as those things always spread, you know, sir--the faster, probably, from _your_ having so often encouraged the sort of thing in us formerly93. It was like treading old ground again."

Mr. Yates took the subject from his friend as soon as possible, and immediately gave Sir Thomas an account of what they had done and were doing: told him of the gradual increase of their views, the happy conclusion of their first difficulties, and present promising94 state of affairs; relating everything with so blind an interest as made him not only totally unconscious of the uneasy movements of many of his friends as they sat, the change of countenance, the fidget, the hem11! of unquietness, but prevented him even from seeing the expression of the face on which his own eyes were fixed--from seeing Sir Thomas's dark brow contract as he looked with inquiring earnestness at his daughters and Edmund, dwelling95 particularly on the latter, and speaking a language, a remonstrance96, a reproof97, which _he_ felt at his heart. Not less acutely was it felt by Fanny, who had edged back her chair behind her aunt's end of the sofa, and, screened from notice herself, saw all that was passing before her. Such a look of reproach at Edmund from his father she could never have expected to witness; and to feel that it was in any degree deserved was an aggravation98 indeed. Sir Thomas's look implied, "On your judgment, Edmund, I depended; what have you been about?" She knelt in spirit to her uncle, and her bosom99 swelled to utter, "Oh, not to _him_! Look so to all the others, but not to _him_!"

Mr. Yates was still talking. "To own the truth, Sir Thomas, we were in the middle of a rehearsal when you arrived this evening. We were going through the three first acts, and not unsuccessfully upon the whole. Our company is now so dispersed100, from the Crawfords being gone home, that nothing more can be done to-night; but if you will give us the honour of your company to-morrow evening, I should not be afraid of the result. We bespeak101 your indulgence, you understand, as young performers; we bespeak your indulgence."

"My indulgence shall be given, sir," replied Sir Thomas gravely, "but without any other rehearsal." And with a relenting smile, he added, "I come home to be happy and indulgent." Then turning away towards any or all of the rest, he tranquilly102 said, "Mr. and Miss Crawford were mentioned in my last letters from Mansfield. Do you find them agreeable acquaintance?"

Tom was the only one at all ready with an answer, but he being entirely103 without particular regard for either, without jealousy either in love or acting, could speak very handsomely of both. "Mr. Crawford was a most pleasant, gentleman-like man; his sister a sweet, pretty, elegant, lively girl."

Mr. Rushworth could be silent no longer. "I do not say he is not gentleman-like, considering; but you should tell your father he is not above five feet eight, or he will be expecting a well-looking man."

Sir Thomas did not quite understand this, and looked with some surprise at the speaker.

"If I must say what I think," continued Mr. Rushworth, "in my opinion it is very disagreeable to be always rehearsing. It is having too much of a good thing. I am not so fond of acting as I was at first. I think we are a great deal better employed, sitting comfortably here among ourselves, and doing nothing."

Sir Thomas looked again, and then replied with an approving smile, "I am happy to find our sentiments on this subject so much the same. It gives me sincere satisfaction. That I should be cautious and quick-sighted, and feel many scruples104 which my children do _not_ feel, is perfectly105 natural; and equally so that my value for domestic tranquillity, for a home which shuts out noisy pleasures, should much exceed theirs. But at your time of life to feel all this, is a most favourable106 circumstance for yourself, and for everybody connected with you; and I am sensible of the importance of having an ally of such weight."

Sir Thomas meant to be giving Mr. Rushworth's opinion in better words than he could find himself. He was aware that he must not expect a genius in Mr. Rushworth; but as a well-judging, steady young man, with better notions than his elocution would do justice to, he intended to value him very highly. It was impossible for many of the others not to smile. Mr. Rushworth hardly knew what to do with so much meaning; but by looking, as he really felt, most exceedingly pleased with Sir Thomas's good opinion, and saying scarcely anything, he did his best towards preserving that good opinion a little longer.

该如何描述这伙人惊恐失措的狼狈相呢?对大多数人来说,这是个惊骇万分的时刻。托马斯爵士已回到了家里!大家立即对此深信不疑。谁也不会认为这是讹诈或误传。从朱莉娅的表情可以看出,这是无可辩驳的事实。经过最初的张皇惊叫之后,有半分钟光景大家都一声不响,个个吓得脸蛋变了样,直瞪瞪地盯着别人,几乎人人都觉得这次打击真是太糟糕,太可怕,来得太不是时候!耶茨先生也许认为只不过是晚上的排练给令人恼火地打断了,拉什沃思先生或许认为这是幸事,但是其他人却个个沮丧,都有几分自咎之感,或莫名的惊恐。这些人都在盘算:“我们会落个什么样的下场?现在该怎么办?”一阵可怕的沉默。与此同时,每个人都听到了开门声和脚步声,足以证明大事不好,越发感到心惊胆战。

朱莉娅是第一个挪动脚步,第一个开口说话。嫉妒和愤懑之情暂时搁置起来,共患难中又收起了自私之心。但是,就在她来到门口的时候,弗雷德里克正在情意绵绵地倾听阿加莎的道白,把她的手压在他的心口。朱莉娅一见到这个场面,见到尽管她已宣布了这可怕的消息,弗雷德里克仍然保持原来的姿势,抓着她姐姐的手不放,她那颗受到伤害的心又给刺痛了,刚才吓白了的脸又气得通红,她转身走出房去,嘴里说:“我才用不着害怕见他呢。”

她这一走,众人如梦方醒。那兄弟俩同时走上前来,觉得不能按兵不动。他们之间只需几句话就足够了。这件事不容再有什么分歧:他们必须马上到客厅里去。玛丽亚抱着同样的想法跟他们一起去,而且此刻三人中数她最有勇气。原来,刚才把朱莉娅气走的那个场面,现在对她倒是最惬意的支持。在这样一个时刻,一个面对特殊考验的重要时刻,亨利·克劳福德依然握着她的手不放,足以打消她长期以来的怀疑和忧虑。她觉得这是忠贞不渝的爱的征兆,不由得心花怒放,连父亲也不怕去见了。他们只顾往外走,拉什沃思先生反复问他们:“我也去吗?我是不是最好也去?我也去是否合适?”他们理也不理。不过,他们刚走出门去,亨利·克劳福德便来回答他急迫的提问,鼓动他一定要赶紧去向托马斯爵士表示敬意,于是他便喜冲冲地紧跟着出了门。

这时,剧场上只剩下了范妮,还有克劳福德兄妹和耶茨先生。表哥、表姐全然不管她,她自己也不敢奢望托马斯爵士对她会像对自己的孩子们一样疼爱,因此她也乐于留在后边,定一定心。尽管事情全不怪她,但她生性正直,比其他人还要忐忑不安,提心吊胆。她快要昏过去了。她过去对姨父一贯的畏惧感又复原了;与此同时,让他眼见着这般局面,她又同情他,也同情几乎所有这帮人——而对埃德蒙的忧虑更是无法形容。她找了个座位,心里尽转着这些可怕的念头,浑身直打哆嗦。而那三人此时已无所顾忌,便发起牢骚来,埋怨托马斯爵士这么早就不期而归,真是一件倒霉透顶的事。他们毫不怜悯这可怜的人,恨不得他在路上多花一倍时间,或者还没离开安提瓜。

克劳福德兄妹俩比耶茨先生更了解这家人,更清楚爵士这一归来会造成什么危害,因此一谈起这件事来,也就更加激愤。他们知道戏是肯定演不成了,觉得他们的计划马上就会彻底告吹。而耶茨先生却认为这只是暂时中断,只是晚上的一场灾难而已。他甚至觉得等喝完了茶,迎接托马斯爵士的忙乱场面结束后,他可以悠闲自得地观赏时,还可以继续排练。克劳福德兄妹俩听了不禁大笑。两人很快就商定,现在最好悄悄走掉,让这家人自己去折腾。他们还建议耶茨先生随他们一起回家,在牧师住宅消磨一个晚上。可是耶茨先生过去交往的人中,没有一个把听父母的话或家人之间要赤诚当做一回事,因而也就看不出有溜之大吉的必要。于是,他谢了他们,说道:“我还是不走为好,既然老先生回来了,我要大大方方地向他表示敬意。再说,我们都溜走了也是对人家的不尊重。”

范妮刚刚镇定了一些,觉得继续待在这里似乎有些失敬。这时,她把这个问题想清楚了。那兄妹俩又托她代为表示歉意,她便在他们准备离去之际走出房去,去履行面见姨父的可怕使命。

好像一眨眼工夫,她就来到了客厅门口。她在门外停了停,想给自己鼓鼓勇气,但她知道勇气是来不了的。她硬着头皮开了门,客厅里的灯火以及那一家人,豁然出现在她眼前。她走进屋来,听见有人提到自己的名字。这时,托马斯爵士正在四下环顾,问道:“范妮呢?我怎么没看见我的小范妮?”等一看到她,便朝她走去,那个亲切劲儿,真叫她受宠若惊、刻骨铭心。他管她叫亲爱的范妮,亲切地吻她,喜不自禁地说她长了好高啊!范妮说不清自己心里是什么滋味,眼也不知道往哪里看是好。她真是百感交集。托马斯爵士从没这么亲切过,从没对她这样亲切。他的态度好像变了,由于欣喜激动的缘故,说起话来也不慢声慢气了,过去那可怕的威严似乎不见了,变得慈祥起来了。他把范妮领到灯光跟前,又一次端详她——特意问了问她身体可好,接着又自我纠正说,他实在没有必要问,因为她的外表可以充分说明问题。范妮先前那张苍白的脸上这时泛起了艳丽的红晕,托马斯爵士的看法一点也不错,她不仅增进了健康,而且出落得越来越美了。接着爵士又问起她家人的情况,特别问起威廉的情况。姨父这么和蔼可亲,范妮责备自己以前为什么不爱他,还把他从海外归来视为不幸。她鼓起勇气抬眼望着他的脸,发现他比以前瘦了,由于劳累和热带气候的缘故,人变黑了,也憔悴了。这时,她心里更是怜惜不已,并且想起来真替他难过:还不知道有多少意想不到的恼人的事在等着他。

一家人按照托马斯爵士的吩咐围着炉火坐下,托马斯爵士还真成了大家活力的源泉。他最有权利滔滔不绝地说话。久离家园,现在又回到家中,回到妻子儿女中间,心里一兴奋,嘴里也就特别爱说话。他想把自己漂洋过海的一桩桩见闻都讲给大家听,乐于回答两个儿子提出的每个问题,几乎是不等提问就回答。他在安提瓜的事情后来办得顺利快当,他没等着坐班轮,而是趁机搭乘一条私人轮船去了利物浦,然后直接从利物浦回到家。他坐在伯特伦夫人身边,怀着由衷的喜悦,环视着周围的一张张面庞,一股脑儿讲述了他办的大大小小的事情,他来来去去的行踪——不过,在讲述的过程中,他不止一次地夹上两句:尽管他事先没有通知,但回来后看到一家人都在这里,真是感到幸运——他在路上虽然盼望如此,但又不敢抱这样的希望。他也没有忘记拉什沃思先生,先是非常友好地接待他,跟他热情地握手,现在又对他特意关照,把他看做与曼斯菲尔德关系最密切的亲朋之一。拉什沃思先生的外表没有令人生厌的地方,托马斯爵士已经喜欢上他了。

这一圈人里,没有一个人像伯特伦夫人那样自始至终带着不折不扣的喜悦,倾听丈夫讲述他的经历。她看到丈夫回来真是高兴至极。丈夫的突然归来使她心花怒放,二十年来都几乎不曾这样激动过。头几分钟,她激动得几乎不知如何是好,随后依然十分兴奋,但能清醒地收起针线活,推开身边的叭儿狗,把沙发上余下的地方全腾给丈夫,并把注意力也全集中到丈夫身上。她没有为任何人担忧的事,不会给她的愉快心情投下阴影。丈夫在海外期间,她自己过着无可指摘的生活,织了不少毛毯,还织了许多花边。她不仅能坦然地为自己的行为担保,而且可以坦然地为所有的年轻人担保,保证他们个个都是行为端正,干的都是有益的事情。她现在又见到丈夫,听他谈笑风生,又悦耳又赏心,感到十分惬意。因此,她开始意识到,假如丈夫推迟归期的话,那朝思暮想的日子该有多么可怕,她怎么能忍受得了。

诺里斯太太绝对不如她妹妹来得快乐。她倒并非担心家里弄成这个样子,托马斯爵士知道后会责备。她已经失去了理智,刚才她妹夫进来的时候,她只是出于本能的谨慎,赶紧收起了拉什沃思先生的红缎子斗篷,此外几乎再无其他惊慌的表现。不过,托马斯爵士回来的方式却令她气恼。她被撇在一边,没起任何作用。托马斯爵士没有先请她走出房来,第一个跟他相见,然后由她把这喜讯传遍全家,他大概比较相信妻子儿女的神经受得起这场惊喜,回来后不找亲友却找管家,几乎是跟管家同时进入客厅。诺里斯太太一向相信,托马斯爵士不管回到家来还是死在外边,消息总得由她来公布于众,可她觉得自己给剥夺了这一职权。现在她想张罗一番,但又没有什么事需要她张罗。她想显示一下她的作用,但眼下什么也不需要,只需要安静和沉默。托马斯爵士要是同意吃饭,她就会去找女管家,令人讨厌地吩咐这吩咐那,并给男仆下达任务,责令他们东奔西跑。但是托马斯爵士坚决不吃晚饭,他什么都不要吃,等到喝茶时再说——等到喝茶时吃点茶点。可诺里斯太太还是不时地劝他来点什么,就在他正讲到他回归英国途中最精彩的一段,他们的船得到警报可能遇到一艘法国武装民船的时候,她突然插嘴要他喝汤。“亲爱的托马斯爵士,你喝碗汤肯定要比喝茶好得多。你就喝碗汤吧。”

托马斯爵士依然无动于衷。“还是那样关心大家的安适,亲爱的诺里斯太太,”他答道。“我真的只等着喝茶,别的什么都不要。”

“那好吧,伯特伦夫人,你这就叫上茶吧,你催一催巴德利,他今天晚上好像拖拖拉拉的。”伯特伦夫人还是照着她的意思办了,托马斯爵士继续讲他的故事。

最后,终于停顿了下来。托马斯爵士把一时能想到的话讲完了,便乐滋滋地环顾四周的亲人,时而看看这个,时而瞧瞧那个,似乎够他满足的了。然而沉默的时间不长。伯特伦夫人由于过于兴奋,不由得话就多起来了。她也不顾孩子们听了心里会是什么滋味,便说:“托马斯爵士,你知道这些年轻人近来在搞什么娱乐活动吗?他们在演戏。我们大家都在为演戏的事忙活。”

“真的啊!你们在演什么戏呀?”

“噢!他们会全都告诉你的。”

“很快会全都告诉你的,”汤姆急忙叫道,一边装出一副毫不在乎的样子。“不过,用不着现在就向父亲唠叨这件事。我们明天再向您细说吧,爸爸。我们只是在上个星期由于没事可干,想给母亲逗逗趣,排练了几场,实在算不了什么。从10月以来,几乎一直在下雨,我们差不多给连日闷在家里。从3号到今天,我简直就没动过一支枪。月初那头两天还多少打了些猎物,但随后就什么也搞不成了。头一天我去了曼斯菲尔德树林,埃德蒙去了伊斯顿那边的矮树丛,总共打回了六对野鸡。其实,我们一个人就能打六倍这么多。不过.您放心好了,我们尽量遵照您的心意,爱护您的野鸡。我想,您会发现您林子里的野鸡决不比以往少。我长到这么大,还从没见过曼斯菲尔德树林里的野鸡像今年这样多。我希望您最近能去打一天猎,爸爸。”

危险暂时过去了,范妮也稍微放了心。但是,不久茶上来之后,托马斯爵士站起来,说他回来了还得去看看他自己的房间,顿时人人又紧张起来。还没来得及跟他说一声房里有些变化,让他有个思想准备,他已经走了。他出去以后,客厅里的人都吓得闷声不响。埃德蒙第一个开口。

“必须想个办法。”他说。

“该想想我们的客人,”玛丽亚说。她仍然觉得自己的手被按在亨利·克劳福德的心口,对别的事情都不在乎。“范妮,你把克劳福德小姐留在哪儿了?”

范妮说他们走了,并把他们的话转告了一下。

“那只剩下可怜的耶茨一个人了,”汤姆嚷道。“我去把他领来。等事情败露以后,他还能帮我们解解围呢。”

汤姆向剧场走去,到了那里刚好看到他父亲和他朋友初次见面的情景。托马斯爵士看到自己房里烛光通明,再往四下一看,发现有近来被人占用的迹象,家具呈现一片杂乱无章的景象,不由得大吃一惊。尤其引他注目的,是弹子房门前的书橱给搬走了。他对这一切惊犹未定,又听到弹子房里有动静,使他越发惊异。有人在那里大声说话——他听不出是谁的声音——还不仅是说话——几乎是吆喝。他朝门口走去,当时还觉得挺高兴,反正有门相通。他一开门,发现自己竟然站在剧场的舞台上,迎面站着一个年轻人,在扯着嗓子念台词,那架势好像要把他打翻在地。就在耶茨看清了托马斯爵士,并表现出比哪次排练表演得都出色的猛地一惊时,汤姆·伯特伦从房间的另一头进来了。有生以来,他从未觉得这样难以做到不动声色。他父亲破例第一遭上戏台,愕然板着一副面孔,惊慨激昂的维尔登海姆男爵渐渐变成了彬彬有礼、笑容可掬的耶茨先生,向托马斯·伯特伦爵士又鞠躬又道歉,那样子活像真的在演戏,他说什么也不愿错过。这将是最后一场——十有八九是这个舞台上的最后一场,不过他相信这是精彩无比的一场,全场会爆发出雷鸣般的掌声。

不过,他没有闲暇沉湎于惬意的想象。他必须走上前去,帮助介绍一下。尽管心里狼狈不堪,他还是尽力而为了。托马斯爵士出于他的为人之道,热情洋溢地欢迎耶茨先生,但是非要结识这样一个人,而且以这样的方式来结识,还真让他心里大为不快。其实,爵士倒也很了解耶茨先生的家人及其亲友,因此,当他儿子把耶茨先生介绍成自己“特别要好的朋友”(他上百个“特别要好的朋友”中的又一个)时,他心里反感至极。他在自己家里受到这样的捉弄,在乌七八糟的舞台上上演了这样可笑的一幕,在这样不幸的时刻被迫去认识一个他不喜欢的年轻人,而在最初五分钟里,这家伙却从容不迫满不在乎,说起话来滔滔不绝,似乎比托马斯爵士更像是这家的人,托马斯爵士只是因为刚回到家正在兴头上,对什么事都能多忍耐三分,才没有发作。

汤姆明白父亲是怎么想的,真心希望他始终能保持良好的心情,不要彻底发作。他现在比什么时候看得都清楚:父亲确有理由生气——他注视天花板和墙上的泥灰并非没有缘故;他也算是出于好奇,一本正经地询问弹子台到哪里去了。双方都有些不愉快,不过只持续了几分钟。耶茨先生热切地请求他对布置是否合适发表意见,他勉强地说了几句不冷不热表示赞同的话,于是三个人一起回到客厅。这时托马斯爵士更加郁郁不乐,这一点人人都注意到了。

“我是从你们的剧场回来的,”他坐下时平静地说道。“我役有料到会闯进剧场。紧挨着我的房间——不过真是完全出乎我的意料,我丝毫没有想到你们演得这么郑重其事。就烛光下见到的情况看来,好像布置得很漂亮,我的朋友克里斯托弗·杰克逊给你们干得不错。”随后,他本想换个话题,平心静气地边喝咖啡边聊些比较平静的家庭事务。但是,耶茨先生没有洞察力,闹不明白托马斯爵士的意思。他身为外人毫无冒昧唐突之感,一点也不畏首畏尾,不懂谦虚谨慎,不会体念别人,非要引着托马斯爵士继续谈演戏的事,拿这方面的问题和言词纠缠他,最后还把他在埃克尔斯福德遇到的扫兴的事原原本本地讲给他听。托马斯爵士客客气气地听着,但觉得耶茨先生很不懂规矩,越听越加深对他的不良印象。听完之后,只是微微鞠了个躬,没做别的表示。

“其实,我们的演戏就是由此引起的,”汤姆经过一番思索,说道。“我的朋友耶茨从埃克尔斯福德带来了这传染病,您知道,这类事情总是要到处感染的,因而也就感染了我们——您以前经常鼓励我们开展这种活动,所以对我们的感染就更快,就像轻车走熟路一样。”

耶茨先生迫不及待地从他朋友那里抢过这个话题,立即向托马斯爵士述说了他们已经做过和正在进行的事情,对他讲起了他们的计划是怎样逐步扩充的,他们起初遇到的困难是怎样圆满解决的,目前的局面如何一片大好。他讲得兴致勃勃,全然没有意识到在座的许多朋友已经坐立不安,脸上红一阵白一阵,身子动来动去,嘴里不住地咳嗽!可他对这一切全都视而不见,连他目不转睛地望着的那张面孔上的表情都看不清楚——看不见托马斯爵士在紧蹙着眉头以急切的探询的目光瞅着他的两个女儿和埃德蒙,尤其是瞅着埃德蒙,这目光像是会说话似的,形成一种责备,一种训斥,埃德蒙倒能心领神会。范妮也有同样痛切的感受,便把自己的椅子移到了姨妈的沙发后面,避开了人们的注意,但却看见了面前发生的一切。她从没料到会眼见着姨父用这种责备的目光来对待埃德蒙。她觉得根本不应该这样对待他,真为他受到这样的责备而恼火。托马斯爵士的目光是在说:“埃德蒙,我本来指望你是有主见的。你在干什么来着?”范妮的心灵跪倒在姨父面前,气鼓鼓地说道:“噢!别这样对待他。拿这种目光去看其他所有的人,但不要这样看他!”

耶茨先生还在滔滔不绝。“托马斯爵士,说实话,今天晚上你到家的时候,我们正在排练。我们先排练前三幕,总的说来,还不算不成功。克劳福德兄妹已经回家去了,我们的班子现在凑不齐了,今天晚上演不成了。不过明天晚上你要是肯赏光的话,我想不会有问题。您知道,我们都是年轻人演戏,请求您的包涵。我们请求您的包涵。”

“我会包涵的,先生,”托马斯爵士板着脸答道,“不过,不要再排练了。”接着温和地笑了笑,补充说道:“我回到家来就是想要快活,想要包涵。”随即转过脸去,像是朝着某人又像是朝着众人,平静地说道:“你们从曼斯菲尔德写给我的最后几封信中,都提到了克劳福德先生和克劳福德小姐。你们觉得和他们交往愉快吗?”

在场的只有汤姆一个人能爽快地回答这个问题,但他并不特别关注这两个人,无论在情场上还是在演戏上对他们都不嫉妒,因此尽可以宽怀大度地夸赞两人。“克劳福德先生举止非常文雅,很有绅士气派。他妹妹是个温柔漂亮、文雅活泼的姑娘。”

拉什沃思先生再也不能沉默了。“总的说来,我倒并不觉得他没有绅士气派。不过,你应该告诉你父亲,他的身高不超过五英尺八英寸,不然的话,你父亲会以为他仪表堂堂呢。”

托马斯爵士不大明白这番话的意思,带着几分莫名其妙的神情望着说话人。

“如果要我实话实说的话,”拉什沃思先生继续说道,“我觉得总是排练是很讨厌的。好东西吃多了也倒胃口。我不像一开始那样喜欢演戏了。我认为大家舒舒服服地坐在这里,什么事情也不做,要比演戏好得多。”

托马斯爵士又看了看他,然后赞许地笑着答道:“我很高兴发现我们在这个问题上的看法大为一致,这使我由衷地感到高兴。我应该谨慎,目光敏锐,考虑到我的孩子考虑不到的许多问题,这是理所当然的。同样理所当然的是,我应该远比他们更重视家庭的安静,重视家中不搞吵吵闹闹的娱乐。不过,你这样的年龄就有这样的想法,这对你个人,对每一个与你有关系的人来说,都是很值得称道的事。能有这样一个志同道合的人,我觉得真是难能可贵。”

托马斯爵士本想用更漂亮的字眼赞扬一下拉什沃思先生的见解,只可惜找不到这样的字眼。他知道他不能指望拉什沃思先生是什么天才,但觉得他是个明白是非、踏实稳重的青年,虽然不善言辞,头脑却很清楚,因此他很器重他。在座的许多人听了忍不住想笑。拉什沃思先生面对这种局面简直不知如何是好。不过,托马斯爵士的好评使他喜不自禁,他喜形于色,几乎一言不发,想尽情多玩味一下这番好评。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 consternation 8OfzB     
n.大为吃惊,惊骇
参考例句:
  • He was filled with consternation to hear that his friend was so ill.他听说朋友病得那么厉害,感到非常震惊。
  • Sam stared at him in consternation.萨姆惊恐不安地注视着他。
2 exclamations aea591b1607dd0b11f1dd659bad7d827     
n.呼喊( exclamation的名词复数 );感叹;感叹语;感叹词
参考例句:
  • The visitors broke into exclamations of wonder when they saw the magnificent Great Wall. 看到雄伟的长城,游客们惊叹不已。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • After the will has been read out, angry exclamations aroused. 遗嘱宣读完之后,激起一片愤怒的喊声。 来自辞典例句
3 spoke XryyC     
n.(车轮的)辐条;轮辐;破坏某人的计划;阻挠某人的行动 v.讲,谈(speak的过去式);说;演说;从某种观点来说
参考例句:
  • They sourced the spoke nuts from our company.他们的轮辐螺帽是从我们公司获得的。
  • The spokes of a wheel are the bars that connect the outer ring to the centre.辐条是轮子上连接外圈与中心的条棒。
4 countenance iztxc     
n.脸色,面容;面部表情;vt.支持,赞同
参考例句:
  • At the sight of this photograph he changed his countenance.他一看见这张照片脸色就变了。
  • I made a fierce countenance as if I would eat him alive.我脸色恶狠狠地,仿佛要把他活生生地吞下去。
5 appalling iNwz9     
adj.骇人听闻的,令人震惊的,可怕的
参考例句:
  • The search was hampered by appalling weather conditions.恶劣的天气妨碍了搜寻工作。
  • Nothing can extenuate such appalling behaviour.这种骇人听闻的行径罪无可恕。
6 blessing UxDztJ     
n.祈神赐福;祷告;祝福,祝愿
参考例句:
  • The blessing was said in Hebrew.祷告用了希伯来语。
  • A double blessing has descended upon the house.双喜临门。
7 corroborating b17b07018d744b60aa2a7417d1b4f5a2     
v.证实,支持(某种说法、信仰、理论等)( corroborate的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • Neither can one really conclude much from a neat desk, unless there is further corroborating evidence. 实际上,我们也无法从一张整洁的办公桌中得出什么结论,除非还有其它证据进一步证实。 来自互联网
8 jealousy WaRz6     
n.妒忌,嫉妒,猜忌
参考例句:
  • Some women have a disposition to jealousy.有些女人生性爱妒忌。
  • I can't support your jealousy any longer.我再也无法忍受你的嫉妒了。
9 narrative CFmxS     
n.叙述,故事;adj.叙事的,故事体的
参考例句:
  • He was a writer of great narrative power.他是一位颇有记述能力的作家。
  • Neither author was very strong on narrative.两个作者都不是很善于讲故事。
10 swelled bd4016b2ddc016008c1fc5827f252c73     
增强( swell的过去式和过去分词 ); 肿胀; (使)凸出; 充满(激情)
参考例句:
  • The infection swelled his hand. 由于感染,他的手肿了起来。
  • After the heavy rain the river swelled. 大雨过后,河水猛涨。
11 hem 7dIxa     
n.贴边,镶边;vt.缝贴边;(in)包围,限制
参考例句:
  • The hem on her skirt needs sewing.她裙子上的褶边需要缝一缝。
  • The hem of your dress needs to be let down an inch.你衣服的折边有必要放长1英寸。
12 stoutest 7de5881daae96ca3fbaeb2b3db494463     
粗壮的( stout的最高级 ); 结实的; 坚固的; 坚定的
参考例句:
  • The screams of the wounded and dying were something to instil fear into the stoutest heart. 受伤者垂死者的尖叫,令最勇敢的人都胆战心惊。
13 peculiar cinyo     
adj.古怪的,异常的;特殊的,特有的
参考例句:
  • He walks in a peculiar fashion.他走路的样子很奇特。
  • He looked at me with a very peculiar expression.他用一种很奇怪的表情看着我。
14 utterly ZfpzM1     
adv.完全地,绝对地
参考例句:
  • Utterly devoted to the people,he gave his life in saving his patients.他忠于人民,把毕生精力用于挽救患者的生命。
  • I was utterly ravished by the way she smiled.她的微笑使我完全陶醉了。
15 inquiry nbgzF     
n.打听,询问,调查,查问
参考例句:
  • Many parents have been pressing for an inquiry into the problem.许多家长迫切要求调查这个问题。
  • The field of inquiry has narrowed down to five persons.调查的范围已经缩小到只剩5个人了。
16 humble ddjzU     
adj.谦卑的,恭顺的;地位低下的;v.降低,贬低
参考例句:
  • In my humble opinion,he will win the election.依我拙见,他将在选举中获胜。
  • Defeat and failure make people humble.挫折与失败会使人谦卑。
17 agitation TN0zi     
n.搅动;搅拌;鼓动,煽动
参考例句:
  • Small shopkeepers carried on a long agitation against the big department stores.小店主们长期以来一直在煽动人们反对大型百货商店。
  • These materials require constant agitation to keep them in suspension.这些药剂要经常搅动以保持悬浮状态。
18 disposition GljzO     
n.性情,性格;意向,倾向;排列,部署
参考例句:
  • He has made a good disposition of his property.他已对财产作了妥善处理。
  • He has a cheerful disposition.他性情开朗。
19 innocence ZbizC     
n.无罪;天真;无害
参考例句:
  • There was a touching air of innocence about the boy.这个男孩有一种令人感动的天真神情。
  • The accused man proved his innocence of the crime.被告人经证实无罪。
20 habitual x5Pyp     
adj.习惯性的;通常的,惯常的
参考例句:
  • He is a habitual criminal.他是一个惯犯。
  • They are habitual visitors to our house.他们是我家的常客。
21 dread Ekpz8     
vt.担忧,忧虑;惧怕,不敢;n.担忧,畏惧
参考例句:
  • We all dread to think what will happen if the company closes.我们都不敢去想一旦公司关门我们该怎么办。
  • Her heart was relieved of its blankest dread.她极度恐惧的心理消除了。
22 compassion 3q2zZ     
n.同情,怜悯
参考例句:
  • He could not help having compassion for the poor creature.他情不自禁地怜悯起那个可怜的人来。
  • Her heart was filled with compassion for the motherless children.她对于没有母亲的孩子们充满了怜悯心。
23 solicitude mFEza     
n.焦虑
参考例句:
  • Your solicitude was a great consolation to me.你对我的关怀给了我莫大的安慰。
  • He is full of tender solicitude towards my sister.他对我妹妹满心牵挂。
24 vent yiPwE     
n.通风口,排放口;开衩;vt.表达,发泄
参考例句:
  • He gave vent to his anger by swearing loudly.他高声咒骂以发泄他的愤怒。
  • When the vent became plugged,the engine would stop.当通风口被堵塞时,发动机就会停转。
25 lamenting 6491a9a531ff875869932a35fccf8e7d     
adj.悲伤的,悲哀的v.(为…)哀悼,痛哭,悲伤( lament的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • Katydids were lamenting fall's approach. 蝈蝈儿正为秋天临近而哀鸣。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  • Lamenting because the papers hadn't been destroyed and the money kept. 她正在吃后悔药呢,后悔自己没有毁了那张字条,把钱昧下来! 来自英汉文学 - 败坏赫德莱堡
26 premature FPfxV     
adj.比预期时间早的;不成熟的,仓促的
参考例句:
  • It is yet premature to predict the possible outcome of the dialogue.预言这次对话可能有什么结果为时尚早。
  • The premature baby is doing well.那个早产的婴儿很健康。
27 untoward Hjvw1     
adj.不利的,不幸的,困难重重的
参考例句:
  • Untoward circumstances prevent me from being with you on this festive occasion.有些不幸的事件使我不能在这欢庆的时刻和你在一起。
  • I'll come if nothing untoward happens.我要是没有特殊情况一定来。
28 mischief jDgxH     
n.损害,伤害,危害;恶作剧,捣蛋,胡闹
参考例句:
  • Nobody took notice of the mischief of the matter. 没有人注意到这件事情所带来的危害。
  • He seems to intend mischief.看来他想捣蛋。
29 inevitably x7axc     
adv.不可避免地;必然发生地
参考例句:
  • In the way you go on,you are inevitably coming apart.照你们这样下去,毫无疑问是会散伙的。
  • Technological changes will inevitably lead to unemployment.技术变革必然会导致失业。
30 rehearsal AVaxu     
n.排练,排演;练习
参考例句:
  • I want to play you a recording of the rehearsal.我想给你放一下彩排的录像。
  • You can sharpen your skills with rehearsal.排练可以让技巧更加纯熟。
31 bustle esazC     
v.喧扰地忙乱,匆忙,奔忙;n.忙碌;喧闹
参考例句:
  • The bustle and din gradually faded to silence as night advanced.随着夜越来越深,喧闹声逐渐沉寂。
  • There is a lot of hustle and bustle in the railway station.火车站里非常拥挤。
32 propriety oRjx4     
n.正当行为;正当;适当
参考例句:
  • We hesitated at the propriety of the method.我们对这种办法是否适用拿不定主意。
  • The sensitive matter was handled with great propriety.这件机密的事处理得极为适当。
33 parental FL2xv     
adj.父母的;父的;母的
参考例句:
  • He encourages parental involvement in the running of school.他鼓励学生家长参与学校的管理。
  • Children always revolt against parental disciplines.孩子们总是反抗父母的管束。
34 penetrated 61c8e5905df30b8828694a7dc4c3a3e0     
adj. 击穿的,鞭辟入里的 动词penetrate的过去式和过去分词形式
参考例句:
  • The knife had penetrated his chest. 刀子刺入了他的胸膛。
  • They penetrated into territory where no man had ever gone before. 他们已进入先前没人去过的地区。
35 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  • This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  • There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
36 sufficiently 0htzMB     
adv.足够地,充分地
参考例句:
  • It turned out he had not insured the house sufficiently.原来他没有给房屋投足保险。
  • The new policy was sufficiently elastic to accommodate both views.新政策充分灵活地适用两种观点。
37 justified 7pSzrk     
a.正当的,有理的
参考例句:
  • She felt fully justified in asking for her money back. 她认为有充分的理由要求退款。
  • The prisoner has certainly justified his claims by his actions. 那个囚犯确实已用自己的行动表明他的要求是正当的。
38 fatigue PhVzV     
n.疲劳,劳累
参考例句:
  • The old lady can't bear the fatigue of a long journey.这位老妇人不能忍受长途旅行的疲劳。
  • I have got over my weakness and fatigue.我已从虚弱和疲劳中恢复过来了。
39 miserable g18yk     
adj.悲惨的,痛苦的;可怜的,糟糕的
参考例句:
  • It was miserable of you to make fun of him.你取笑他,这是可耻的。
  • Her past life was miserable.她过去的生活很苦。
40 thither cgRz1o     
adv.向那里;adj.在那边的,对岸的
参考例句:
  • He wandered hither and thither looking for a playmate.他逛来逛去找玩伴。
  • He tramped hither and thither.他到处流浪。
41 vessel 4L1zi     
n.船舶;容器,器皿;管,导管,血管
参考例句:
  • The vessel is fully loaded with cargo for Shanghai.这艘船满载货物驶往上海。
  • You should put the water into a vessel.你应该把水装入容器中。
42 proceeding Vktzvu     
n.行动,进行,(pl.)会议录,学报
参考例句:
  • This train is now proceeding from Paris to London.这次列车从巴黎开往伦敦。
  • The work is proceeding briskly.工作很有生气地进展着。
43 proceedings Wk2zvX     
n.进程,过程,议程;诉讼(程序);公报
参考例句:
  • He was released on bail pending committal proceedings. 他交保获释正在候审。
  • to initiate legal proceedings against sb 对某人提起诉讼
44 promptly LRMxm     
adv.及时地,敏捷地
参考例句:
  • He paid the money back promptly.他立即还了钱。
  • She promptly seized the opportunity his absence gave her.她立即抓住了因他不在场给她创造的机会。
45 pointed Il8zB4     
adj.尖的,直截了当的
参考例句:
  • He gave me a very sharp pointed pencil.他给我一支削得非常尖的铅笔。
  • She wished to show Mrs.John Dashwood by this pointed invitation to her brother.她想通过对达茨伍德夫人提出直截了当的邀请向她的哥哥表示出来。
46 liking mpXzQ5     
n.爱好;嗜好;喜欢
参考例句:
  • The word palate also means taste or liking.Palate这个词也有“口味”或“嗜好”的意思。
  • I must admit I have no liking for exaggeration.我必须承认我不喜欢夸大其词。
47 enjoyment opaxV     
n.乐趣;享有;享用
参考例句:
  • Your company adds to the enjoyment of our visit. 有您的陪同,我们这次访问更加愉快了。
  • After each joke the old man cackled his enjoyment.每逢讲完一个笑话,这老人就呵呵笑着表示他的高兴。
48 animated Cz7zMa     
adj.生气勃勃的,活跃的,愉快的
参考例句:
  • His observations gave rise to an animated and lively discussion.他的言论引起了一场气氛热烈而活跃的讨论。
  • We had an animated discussion over current events last evening.昨天晚上我们热烈地讨论时事。
49 irreproachably d8550deb5f0690a0e9330283d02a49ca     
adv.不可非难地,无过失地
参考例句:
50 narratives 91f2774e518576e3f5253e0a9c364ac7     
记叙文( narrative的名词复数 ); 故事; 叙述; 叙述部分
参考例句:
  • Marriage, which has been the bourne of so many narratives, is still a great beginning. 结婚一向是许多小说的终点,然而也是一个伟大的开始。
  • This is one of the narratives that children are fond of. 这是孩子们喜欢的故事之一。
51 lengthened 4c0dbc9eb35481502947898d5e9f0a54     
(时间或空间)延长,伸长( lengthen的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • The afternoon shadows lengthened. 下午影子渐渐变长了。
  • He wanted to have his coat lengthened a bit. 他要把上衣放长一些。
52 approbation INMyt     
n.称赞;认可
参考例句:
  • He tasted the wine of audience approbation.他尝到了像酒般令人陶醉的听众赞许滋味。
  • The result has not met universal approbation.该结果尚未获得普遍认同。
53 judgment e3xxC     
n.审判;判断力,识别力,看法,意见
参考例句:
  • The chairman flatters himself on his judgment of people.主席自认为他审视人比别人高明。
  • He's a man of excellent judgment.他眼力过人。
54 instinctive c6jxT     
adj.(出于)本能的;直觉的;(出于)天性的
参考例句:
  • He tried to conceal his instinctive revulsion at the idea.他试图饰盖自己对这一想法本能的厌恶。
  • Animals have an instinctive fear of fire.动物本能地怕火。
55 vexed fd1a5654154eed3c0a0820ab54fb90a7     
adj.争论不休的;(指问题等)棘手的;争论不休的问题;烦恼的v.使烦恼( vex的过去式和过去分词 );使苦恼;使生气;详细讨论
参考例句:
  • The conference spent days discussing the vexed question of border controls. 会议花了几天的时间讨论边境关卡这个难题。
  • He was vexed at his failure. 他因失败而懊恼。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
56 dependence 3wsx9     
n.依靠,依赖;信任,信赖;隶属
参考例句:
  • Doctors keep trying to break her dependence of the drug.医生们尽力使她戒除毒瘾。
  • He was freed from financial dependence on his parents.他在经济上摆脱了对父母的依赖。
57 defrauded 46b197145611d09ab7ea08b6701b776c     
v.诈取,骗取( defraud的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • He defrauded his employers of thousands of dollars. 他诈取了他的雇主一大笔钱。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • He defrauded them of their money. 他骗走了他们的钱。 来自辞典例句
58 tranquillity 93810b1103b798d7e55e2b944bcb2f2b     
n. 平静, 安静
参考例句:
  • The phenomenon was so striking and disturbing that his philosophical tranquillity vanished. 这个令人惶惑不安的现象,扰乱了他的旷达宁静的心境。
  • My value for domestic tranquillity should much exceed theirs. 我应该远比他们重视家庭的平静生活。
59 housekeeper 6q2zxl     
n.管理家务的主妇,女管家
参考例句:
  • A spotless stove told us that his mother is a diligent housekeeper.炉子清洁无瑕就表明他母亲是个勤劳的主妇。
  • She is an economical housekeeper and feeds her family cheaply.她节约持家,一家人吃得很省。
60 despatch duyzn1     
n./v.(dispatch)派遣;发送;n.急件;新闻报道
参考例句:
  • The despatch of the task force is purely a contingency measure.派出特遣部队纯粹是应急之举。
  • He rushed the despatch through to headquarters.他把急件赶送到总部。
61 resolutely WW2xh     
adj.坚决地,果断地
参考例句:
  • He resolutely adhered to what he had said at the meeting. 他坚持他在会上所说的话。
  • He grumbles at his lot instead of resolutely facing his difficulties. 他不是果敢地去面对困难,而是抱怨自己运气不佳。
62 intervals f46c9d8b430e8c86dea610ec56b7cbef     
n.[军事]间隔( interval的名词复数 );间隔时间;[数学]区间;(戏剧、电影或音乐会的)幕间休息
参考例句:
  • The forecast said there would be sunny intervals and showers. 预报间晴,有阵雨。
  • Meetings take place at fortnightly intervals. 每两周开一次会。
63 recital kAjzI     
n.朗诵,独奏会,独唱会
参考例句:
  • She is going to give a piano recital.她即将举行钢琴独奏会。
  • I had their total attention during the thirty-five minutes that my recital took.在我叙述的35分钟内,他们完全被我吸引了。
64 immediate aapxh     
adj.立即的;直接的,最接近的;紧靠的
参考例句:
  • His immediate neighbours felt it their duty to call.他的近邻认为他们有责任去拜访。
  • We declared ourselves for the immediate convocation of the meeting.我们主张立即召开这个会议。
65 exhausted 7taz4r     
adj.极其疲惫的,精疲力尽的
参考例句:
  • It was a long haul home and we arrived exhausted.搬运回家的这段路程特别长,到家时我们已筋疲力尽。
  • Jenny was exhausted by the hustle of city life.珍妮被城市生活的忙乱弄得筋疲力尽。
66 joyfully joyfully     
adv. 喜悦地, 高兴地
参考例句:
  • She tripped along joyfully as if treading on air. 她高兴地走着,脚底下轻飘飘的。
  • During these first weeks she slaved joyfully. 在最初的几周里,她干得很高兴。
67 elation 0q9x7     
n.兴高采烈,洋洋得意
参考例句:
  • She showed her elation at having finally achieved her ambition.最终实现了抱负,她显得十分高兴。
  • His supporters have reacted to the news with elation.他的支持者听到那条消息后兴高采烈。
68 acting czRzoc     
n.演戏,行为,假装;adj.代理的,临时的,演出用的
参考例句:
  • Ignore her,she's just acting.别理她,她只是假装的。
  • During the seventies,her acting career was in eclipse.在七十年代,她的表演生涯黯然失色。
69 affected TzUzg0     
adj.不自然的,假装的
参考例句:
  • She showed an affected interest in our subject.她假装对我们的课题感到兴趣。
  • His manners are affected.他的态度不自然。
70 mere rC1xE     
adj.纯粹的;仅仅,只不过
参考例句:
  • That is a mere repetition of what you said before.那不过是重复了你以前讲的话。
  • It's a mere waste of time waiting any longer.再等下去纯粹是浪费时间。
71 incessant WcizU     
adj.不停的,连续的
参考例句:
  • We have had incessant snowfall since yesterday afternoon.从昨天下午开始就持续不断地下雪。
  • She is tired of his incessant demands for affection.她厌倦了他对感情的不断索取。
72 brace 0WzzE     
n. 支柱,曲柄,大括号; v. 绷紧,顶住,(为困难或坏事)做准备
参考例句:
  • My daughter has to wear a brace on her teeth. 我的女儿得戴牙套以矫正牙齿。
  • You had better brace yourself for some bad news. 有些坏消息,你最好做好准备。
73 subsided 1bda21cef31764468020a8c83598cc0d     
v.(土地)下陷(因在地下采矿)( subside的过去式和过去分词 );减弱;下降至较低或正常水平;一下子坐在椅子等上
参考例句:
  • After the heavy rains part of the road subsided. 大雨过后,部分公路塌陷了。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • By evening the storm had subsided and all was quiet again. 傍晚, 暴风雨已经过去,四周开始沉寂下来。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
74 disappearance ouEx5     
n.消失,消散,失踪
参考例句:
  • He was hard put to it to explain her disappearance.他难以说明她为什么不见了。
  • Her disappearance gave rise to the wildest rumours.她失踪一事引起了各种流言蜚语。
75 ranting f455c2eeccb0d93f31e63b89e6858159     
v.夸夸其谈( rant的现在分词 );大叫大嚷地以…说教;气愤地)大叫大嚷;不停地大声抱怨
参考例句:
  • Mrs. Sakagawa stopped her ranting. 坂川太太戛然中断悲声。 来自辞典例句
  • He was ranting about the murder of his dad. 他大叫她就是杀死他父亲的凶手。 来自电影对白
76 backwards BP9ya     
adv.往回地,向原处,倒,相反,前后倒置地
参考例句:
  • He turned on the light and began to pace backwards and forwards.他打开电灯并开始走来走去。
  • All the girls fell over backwards to get the party ready.姑娘们迫不及待地为聚会做准备。
77 rehearsals 58abf70ed0ce2d3ac723eb2d13c1c6b5     
n.练习( rehearsal的名词复数 );排练;复述;重复
参考例句:
  • The earlier protests had just been dress rehearsals for full-scale revolution. 早期的抗议仅仅是大革命开始前的预演。
  • She worked like a demon all through rehearsals. 她每次排演时始终精力过人。 来自《简明英汉词典》
78 amazement 7zlzBK     
n.惊奇,惊讶
参考例句:
  • All those around him looked at him with amazement.周围的人都对他投射出惊异的眼光。
  • He looked at me in blank amazement.他带着迷茫惊诧的神情望着我。
79 baron XdSyp     
n.男爵;(商业界等)巨头,大王
参考例句:
  • Henry Ford was an automobile baron.亨利·福特是一位汽车业巨头。
  • The baron lived in a strong castle.男爵住在一座坚固的城堡中。
80 eclat 7kbzV     
n.显赫之成功,荣誉
参考例句:
  • He a diplomat of great eclat.他是个声望显赫的外交家。
  • They gave him more eclat than he really deserved.他并不真得值得他们给他那么多的荣誉。
81 theatrical pIRzF     
adj.剧场的,演戏的;做戏似的,做作的
参考例句:
  • The final scene was dismayingly lacking in theatrical effect.最后一场缺乏戏剧效果,叫人失望。
  • She always makes some theatrical gesture.她老在做些夸张的手势。
82 disapproving bddf29198e28ab64a272563d29c1f915     
adj.不满的,反对的v.不赞成( disapprove的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  • Mother gave me a disapproving look. 母亲的眼神告诉我她是不赞成的。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • Her father threw a disapproving glance at her. 她父亲不满地瞥了她一眼。 来自《简明英汉词典》
83 indifference k8DxO     
n.不感兴趣,不关心,冷淡,不在乎
参考例句:
  • I was disappointed by his indifference more than somewhat.他的漠不关心使我很失望。
  • He feigned indifference to criticism of his work.他假装毫不在意别人批评他的作品。
84 heartily Ld3xp     
adv.衷心地,诚恳地,十分,很
参考例句:
  • He ate heartily and went out to look for his horse.他痛快地吃了一顿,就出去找他的马。
  • The host seized my hand and shook it heartily.主人抓住我的手,热情地和我握手。
85 sipped 22d1585d494ccee63c7bff47191289f6     
v.小口喝,呷,抿( sip的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • He sipped his coffee pleasurably. 他怡然地品味着咖啡。
  • I sipped the hot chocolate she had made. 我小口喝着她调制的巧克力热饮。 来自辞典例句
86 hue qdszS     
n.色度;色调;样子
参考例句:
  • The diamond shone with every hue under the sun.金刚石在阳光下放出五颜六色的光芒。
  • The same hue will look different in different light.同一颜色在不同的光线下看起来会有所不同。
87 delicacy mxuxS     
n.精致,细微,微妙,精良;美味,佳肴
参考例句:
  • We admired the delicacy of the craftsmanship.我们佩服工艺师精巧的手艺。
  • He sensed the delicacy of the situation.他感觉到了形势的微妙。
88 discretion FZQzm     
n.谨慎;随意处理
参考例句:
  • You must show discretion in choosing your friend.你择友时必须慎重。
  • Please use your best discretion to handle the matter.请慎重处理此事。
89 discourse 2lGz0     
n.论文,演说;谈话;话语;vi.讲述,著述
参考例句:
  • We'll discourse on the subject tonight.我们今晚要谈论这个问题。
  • He fell into discourse with the customers who were drinking at the counter.他和站在柜台旁的酒客谈了起来。
90 mingled fdf34efd22095ed7e00f43ccc823abdf     
混合,混入( mingle的过去式和过去分词 ); 混进,与…交往[联系]
参考例句:
  • The sounds of laughter and singing mingled in the evening air. 笑声和歌声交织在夜空中。
  • The man and the woman mingled as everyone started to relax. 当大家开始放松的时候,这一男一女就开始交往了。
91 obtrusiveness 2fc698141358f142958cd08df0d4926b     
参考例句:
92 torment gJXzd     
n.折磨;令人痛苦的东西(人);vt.折磨;纠缠
参考例句:
  • He has never suffered the torment of rejection.他从未经受过遭人拒绝的痛苦。
  • Now nothing aggravates me more than when people torment each other.没有什么东西比人们的互相折磨更使我愤怒。
93 formerly ni3x9     
adv.从前,以前
参考例句:
  • We now enjoy these comforts of which formerly we had only heard.我们现在享受到了过去只是听说过的那些舒适条件。
  • This boat was formerly used on the rivers of China.这船从前航行在中国内河里。
94 promising BkQzsk     
adj.有希望的,有前途的
参考例句:
  • The results of the experiments are very promising.实验的结果充满了希望。
  • We're trying to bring along one or two promising young swimmers.我们正设法培养出一两名有前途的年轻游泳选手。
95 dwelling auzzQk     
n.住宅,住所,寓所
参考例句:
  • Those two men are dwelling with us.那两个人跟我们住在一起。
  • He occupies a three-story dwelling place on the Park Street.他在派克街上有一幢3层楼的寓所。
96 remonstrance bVex0     
n抗议,抱怨
参考例句:
  • She had abandoned all attempts at remonstrance with Thomas.她已经放弃了一切劝戒托马斯的尝试。
  • Mrs. Peniston was at the moment inaccessible to remonstrance.目前彭尼斯顿太太没功夫听她告状。
97 reproof YBhz9     
n.斥责,责备
参考例句:
  • A smart reproof is better than smooth deceit.严厉的责难胜过温和的欺骗。
  • He is impatient of reproof.他不能忍受指责。
98 aggravation PKYyD     
n.烦恼,恼火
参考例句:
  • She stirred in aggravation as she said this. 她说这句话,激动得过分。
  • Can't stand the aggravation, all day I get aggravation. You know how it is." 我整天都碰到令人发火的事,你可想而知这是什么滋味。” 来自教父部分
99 bosom Lt9zW     
n.胸,胸部;胸怀;内心;adj.亲密的
参考例句:
  • She drew a little book from her bosom.她从怀里取出一本小册子。
  • A dark jealousy stirred in his bosom.他内心生出一阵恶毒的嫉妒。
100 dispersed b24c637ca8e58669bce3496236c839fa     
adj. 被驱散的, 被分散的, 散布的
参考例句:
  • The clouds dispersed themselves. 云散了。
  • After school the children dispersed to their homes. 放学后,孩子们四散回家了。
101 bespeak EQ7yI     
v.预定;预先请求
参考例句:
  • Today's events bespeak future tragedy.今天的事件预示着未来的不幸。
  • The tone of his text bespeaks certain tiredness.他的笔调透出一种倦意。
102 tranquilly d9b4cfee69489dde2ee29b9be8b5fb9c     
adv. 宁静地
参考例句:
  • He took up his brush and went tranquilly to work. 他拿起刷子,一声不响地干了起来。
  • The evening was closing down tranquilly. 暮色正在静悄悄地笼罩下来。
103 entirely entirely     
ad.全部地,完整地;完全地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The fire was entirely caused by their neglect of duty. 那场火灾完全是由于他们失职而引起的。
  • His life was entirely given up to the educational work. 他的一生统统献给了教育工作。
104 scruples 14d2b6347f5953bad0a0c5eebf78068a     
n.良心上的不安( scruple的名词复数 );顾虑,顾忌v.感到于心不安,有顾忌( scruple的第三人称单数 )
参考例句:
  • I overcame my moral scruples. 我抛开了道德方面的顾虑。
  • I'm not ashamed of my scruples about your family. They were natural. 我并未因为对你家人的顾虑而感到羞耻。这种感觉是自然而然的。 来自疯狂英语突破英语语调
105 perfectly 8Mzxb     
adv.完美地,无可非议地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The witnesses were each perfectly certain of what they said.证人们个个对自己所说的话十分肯定。
  • Everything that we're doing is all perfectly above board.我们做的每件事情都是光明正大的。
106 favourable favourable     
adj.赞成的,称赞的,有利的,良好的,顺利的
参考例句:
  • The company will lend you money on very favourable terms.这家公司将以非常优惠的条件借钱给你。
  • We found that most people are favourable to the idea.我们发现大多数人同意这个意见。


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