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Chapter 10 BACK WITH THE FAIR-FOLK AGAIN
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Chapter 10 BACK WITH THE FAIR-FOLK AGAIN
  THE four of them, with Timmy capering1 behind, ran to meet Jo. She beamed at everyone.
  'Hallo, Anne, hallo, George! Pleased to meet you again! This isn't half a surprise!'
  'Jo! How did you get those horses?' said Dick, taking one by the bridle2.
  'Easy,' grinned Jo. 'I just told Uncle Fredo all about you - what wonders you were - and all you didfor me - and wasn't I shocked when I heard they'd turned you out of your field! I let go then!
  I told them just what I thought of them, treating my best friends like that!'
  'Did you really, Jo?' said George, doubtfully.
  'Didn't you hear me?' demanded Jo. 'I yelled like anything at Uncle Fredo, and then his wife, my AuntAnita, she yelled at him too - and then we both yelled at everyone.'
  'It must have been quite a yelling match,' said Julian. 'And the result was that you got your way, andgot the horses to take back our caravans4, Jo?'
  'Well, when Aunt Anita told me they'd taken your caravans into the next field and left them there, andwouldn't lend you horses to bring them back, I told them all a few things,' said Jo. 'I said - no, I'dbetter not tell you what I said. I wasn't very polite.'
  'I bet you weren't' said Dick, who had already had a little experience of Jo's wild tongue the yearbefore.
  'And when I told them how my father went to prison, and you got me a home with somebody nicewho looks after me, they were sorry they'd treated you roughly,' said Jo. 'And so I told Uncle Fredo Iwas going to catch two horses and bring your caravans back into the field again.'
  'I see,' said Julian. 'And the fair-folk just let you?'
  'Oh, yes,' said Jo. 'So let's hitch5 them in, Julian, and go back at once. Isn't that the farmer coming overthere?'
  It was, and he looked pretty grim. Julian hurriedly put one horse into the shafts6 of the girls'
  caravan3, and Dick backed the other horse into the shafts of the second caravan. The farmer came 42up and watched.
  'So you thought you'd get horses after all, did you?' he said. 'I thought you would telling me a lot ofpoppycock about being stranded7 here and not being able to get away!'
  'Grrrrrrrr,' said Timmy at once, but he was the only one who made any reply!
  'Gee-up!' said Jo, taking the reins8 of the horse pulling the girls' caravan. 'Hup there! Git along, willyou?'
  The horse got along, and Jo wickedly drove him so near to the farmer that he had to move back in ahurry. He growled9 something at her. Timmy, appearing round the caravan, growled back.
  The farmer stood back further, and watched the two caravans going down the hillside, out throughthe wide gap in the hedge, and down the lane.
  They came to the field-gate and Anne opened it. In went the horses, straining now, because they weregoing uphill, and the vans were heavy. At last they arrived in the corner where the vans had stoodbefore. Julian backed them over the same bit of ground.
  He unhitched the horses, and threw the reins of the second horse to Dick. 'We'll take them backourselves,' he said.
  So the two boys walked the horses over to Alfredo, who was pegging10 up some washing on a line.
  It seemed a most unsuitable thing for a fire-eater to do, but Alfredo didn't seem to mind.
  'Mr. Alfredo, thank you for lending us the horses,' said Julian, in his politest tones. 'Shall we tie themup anywhere, or set them loose?'
  Alfredo turned round, and took some pegs11 out of his large mouth. He looked rather ashamed.
  'Set them loose,' he said. He hesitated before he put the pegs back into his mouth. 'We didn't knowyou were friends with my niece,' he said. 'She told us all about you. You should have told us youknew her.'
  'And how could he do that when he didn't know she was your niece?' shouted Mrs. Alfredo from thecaravan door. 'Fredo, you have no brains, not a single brain do you have. Ahhhhhh! Now you dropmy best blouse on the ground!'
  She ran out at top speed, and Alfredo stared in alarm. Fortunately she had no saucepan with her thistime. She turned to the two amused boys.
  'Alfredo is sorry he took your caravans away,' she said, 'are you not, Fredo?'
  'Well! It was you who...' began Alfredo, with a look of astonishment12. But he wasn't allowed to finish.
  His dark little wife gave him a violent nudge, and spoke13 again herself, her words tumbling 43over one another.
  'Pay no attention to this big bad man! He has no brains. He can only eat fire, and that is a poor thingto do! Now Jo, she has brains. Now, are you not glad that you are back again in your corner?'
  'I should have felt gladder if you had all been friendly to us,' said Julian. 'I'm afraid we don't feel likestopping here any longer, though. We shall probably leave tomorrow.'
  'Now there, Fredo, see what you have done! You have chased away these nice children!' cried Mrs.
  Alfredo. 'They have manners, these boys, a thing you know nothing about, Fredo. You should learnfrom them, Fredo, you should...'
  Fredo took some pegs from his mouth to make an indignant answer, but his wife suddenly gave ashriek and ran to her caravan. 'Something burns! Something burns!'
  Alfredo gave a hearty14 laugh, a loud guffaw15 that surprised the boys. 'Ha! She bakes today, and burnsher cake! She has no brains, that woman! No brains at all!'
  Julian and Dick turned to go. Alfredo spoke to them in a low voice. 'You can stay here now, here inthis field. You are Jo's friend. That is enough for us.'
  'It may be,' said Julian. 'But it's not quite enough for us, I'm afraid. We shall leave tomorrow.'
  The boys went back to the caravans. Jo sat on the grass with George and Anne, eagerly telling themof her life with a very nice family. 'But they won't let me wear shorts or be a boy,' she ended sadly.
  'That's why I wear a skirt now. Could you lend me some shorts, George?'
  'No, I couldn't,' said George, firmly. Jo was quite enough like her as it was, without wearing shorts!
  'Well, you seem to have turned over a new leaf, Jo. Can you read and write yet?'
  'Almost,' said Jo, and turned her eyes away. She found lessons very difficult, for she had never beento school when she lived with her gypsy father. She looked back again with bright eyes.
  'Can I stay with you?' she said. 'My foster-mother would let me, I know - if it was you I was with.'
  'Didn't you tell her you were coming here?' said Dick. 'That was unkind, Jo.'
  'I never thought,' said Jo. 'You send her a card for me, Dick.'
  'Send one yourself,' said George at once. 'You said you could write.'
  Jo took no notice of that remark. 'Can I stay with you?' she said. 'I won't sleep in the caravans, I'lldoss down underneath16. I always did that when the weather was fine, and I lived with my Dad in hiscaravan. It would be a change for me now not to live in a house. I like lots of things in 44houses, though I never thought I would - but I shall always like sleeping rough best.'
  'Well - you could stay here with us, if we were going to stay,' said Julian. 'But I don't much feelinclined to, now we've had such an unfriendly welcome from everyone.'
  'I'll tell everyone to be kind to you,' said Jo at once, and got up as if she meant to go then and there toforce everyone into kindness!
  Dick pushed her down. 'No. We'll stay here one more day and night, and make up our mindstomorrow. What do you say, Julian?'
  'Right,' said Julian. He looked at his watch. 'Let's go and celebrate Jo's coming with a few ice-creams.
  And I expect you two girls have got some shopping to do, haven't you?'
  'Yes,' said Anne, and fetched the shopping bags. They set off down the hill, the five of them andTimmy. As they passed the snake-man he called out cheerily to them: 'Good morning! Nice day, isn'tit?'
  After the surliness and sulkiness the children had got from the fair-folk up till then, this came as asurprise. Anne smiled, but the boys and George merely nodded and passed by. They were not soforgiving as Anne!
  They passed the rubber-man, bringing back water. Behind him came the rope-man. Both of themnodded to the children, and the sad-looking rubber-man actually gave a brief grin.
  Then they saw Bufflo, practising with his whip - crack-crack-crack! He came over to them. 'If you'dlike a crack with my whip, you're welcome any time,' he said to Julian.
  'Thanks,' said Julian, politely but stiffly. 'But we're probably leaving tomorrow.'
  'Keep your hair on!' said Bufflo, feeling snubbed.
  'I would if you'd let me,' said Julian at once, rubbing his hand over the top of his head where Bufflohad stripped off a few up-standing hairs.
  'Ho, ho!' guffawed17 Bufflo and then stopped abruptly18, afraid he had given offence. Julian grinned athim. He rather liked Bufflo, with his mop of yellow hair and lazy drawl.
  'You stay on with us,' said Bufflo. 'I'll lend you a whip.'
  'We're probably leaving tomorrow,' repeated Julian. He nodded to him, and went on with the others.
  'I'm beginning to feel I'd rather like to stay after all,' said George. 'It makes such a difference if peopleare friendly.'
  'Well, we're not staying,' said Julian, shortly. 'I've practically made up my mind - but we'll just 45wait till tomorrow. It's a - a matter of pride with me. You girls don't understand quite how I feel aboutthe whole thing.'
  They didn't. Dick understood, though, and he agreed with Julian. They went on down to the villageand made their way to the ice-cream shop.
  They had a very pleasant day. They had a wonderful lunch on the grass by their caravans - and totheir surprise Mrs. Alfredo presented them with a sponge sandwich she had made. Anne thanked hervery much indeed to make up for a certain stiffness in the thanks of the two boys.
  'You might have said a bit more,' she said reproachfully to them. 'She really is a kind little woman.
  Honestly I wouldn't mind staying on now.'
  But Julian was curiously19 obstinate20 about it. He shook his head. 'We go tomorrow,' he said.
  'Unless something unexpected happens to make us stay. And it won't.'
  But Julian was quite wrong. Something unexpected did happen. Something really very peculiarindeed.

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1 capering d4ea412ac03a170b293139861cb3c627     
v.跳跃,雀跃( caper的现在分词 );蹦蹦跳跳
参考例句:
  • The lambs were capering in the fields. 羊羔在地里欢快地跳跃。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The boy was Capering dersively, with obscene unambiguous gestures, before a party of English tourists. 这个顽童在一群英国旅游客人面前用明显下流的动作可笑地蹦蹦跳跳着。 来自辞典例句
2 bridle 4sLzt     
n.笼头,束缚;vt.抑制,约束;动怒
参考例句:
  • He learned to bridle his temper.他学会了控制脾气。
  • I told my wife to put a bridle on her tongue.我告诉妻子说话要谨慎。
3 caravan OrVzu     
n.大蓬车;活动房屋
参考例句:
  • The community adviser gave us a caravan to live in.社区顾问给了我们一间活动住房栖身。
  • Geoff connected the caravan to the car.杰弗把旅行用的住屋拖车挂在汽车上。
4 caravans 44e69dd45f2a4d2a551377510c9ca407     
(可供居住的)拖车(通常由机动车拖行)( caravan的名词复数 ); 篷车; (穿过沙漠地带的)旅行队(如商队)
参考例句:
  • Old-fashioned gypsy caravans are painted wooden vehicles that are pulled by horses. 旧式的吉卜赛大篷车是由马拉的涂了颜色的木质车辆。
  • Old-fashioned gypsy caravans are painted wooden vehicles. 旧时的吉普赛大篷车是涂了颜色的木质车辆。
5 hitch UcGxu     
v.免费搭(车旅行);系住;急提;n.故障;急拉
参考例句:
  • They had an eighty-mile journey and decided to hitch hike.他们要走80英里的路程,最后决定搭便车。
  • All the candidates are able to answer the questions without any hitch.所有报考者都能对答如流。
6 shafts 8a8cb796b94a20edda1c592a21399c6b     
n.轴( shaft的名词复数 );(箭、高尔夫球棒等的)杆;通风井;一阵(疼痛、害怕等)
参考例句:
  • He deliberately jerked the shafts to rock him a bit. 他故意的上下颠动车把,摇这个老猴子几下。 来自汉英文学 - 骆驼祥子
  • Shafts were sunk, with tunnels dug laterally. 竖井已经打下,并且挖有横向矿道。 来自辞典例句
7 stranded thfz18     
a.搁浅的,进退两难的
参考例句:
  • He was stranded in a strange city without money. 他流落在一个陌生的城市里, 身无分文,一筹莫展。
  • I was stranded in the strange town without money or friends. 我困在那陌生的城市,既没有钱,又没有朋友。
8 reins 370afc7786679703b82ccfca58610c98     
感情,激情; 缰( rein的名词复数 ); 控制手段; 掌管; (成人带着幼儿走路以防其走失时用的)保护带
参考例句:
  • She pulled gently on the reins. 她轻轻地拉着缰绳。
  • The government has imposed strict reins on the import of luxury goods. 政府对奢侈品的进口有严格的控制手段。
9 growled 65a0c9cac661e85023a63631d6dab8a3     
v.(动物)发狺狺声, (雷)作隆隆声( growl的过去式和过去分词 );低声咆哮着说
参考例句:
  • \"They ought to be birched, \" growled the old man. 老人咆哮道:“他们应受到鞭打。” 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • He growled out an answer. 他低声威胁着回答。 来自《简明英汉词典》
10 pegging e0267dc579cdee0424847f2cd6cd6cb6     
n.外汇钉住,固定证券价格v.用夹子或钉子固定( peg的现在分词 );使固定在某水平
参考例句:
  • To write a novel,one must keep pegging away at it consistently. 要写小说,必须不断辛勤劳动。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • She was pegging the clothes out on the line to dry. 她正在把衣服夹在晒衣绳上晾干。 来自辞典例句
11 pegs 6e3949e2f13b27821b0b2a5124975625     
n.衣夹( peg的名词复数 );挂钉;系帐篷的桩;弦钮v.用夹子或钉子固定( peg的第三人称单数 );使固定在某水平
参考例句:
  • She hung up the shirt with two (clothes) pegs. 她用两只衣夹挂上衬衫。 来自辞典例句
  • The vice-presidents were all square pegs in round holes. 各位副总裁也都安排得不得其所。 来自辞典例句
12 astonishment VvjzR     
n.惊奇,惊异
参考例句:
  • They heard him give a loud shout of astonishment.他们听见他惊奇地大叫一声。
  • I was filled with astonishment at her strange action.我对她的奇怪举动不胜惊异。
13 spoke XryyC     
n.(车轮的)辐条;轮辐;破坏某人的计划;阻挠某人的行动 v.讲,谈(speak的过去式);说;演说;从某种观点来说
参考例句:
  • They sourced the spoke nuts from our company.他们的轮辐螺帽是从我们公司获得的。
  • The spokes of a wheel are the bars that connect the outer ring to the centre.辐条是轮子上连接外圈与中心的条棒。
14 hearty Od1zn     
adj.热情友好的;衷心的;尽情的,纵情的
参考例句:
  • After work they made a hearty meal in the worker's canteen.工作完了,他们在工人食堂饱餐了一顿。
  • We accorded him a hearty welcome.我们给他热忱的欢迎。
15 guffaw XyUyr     
n.哄笑;突然的大笑
参考例句:
  • All the boys burst out into a guffaw at the joke.听到这个笑话,男孩子们发出一阵哄笑。
  • As they guffawed loudly,the ticket collector arrived.他们正哈哈大笑的时候,检票员到了。
16 underneath VKRz2     
adj.在...下面,在...底下;adv.在下面
参考例句:
  • Working underneath the car is always a messy job.在汽车底下工作是件脏活。
  • She wore a coat with a dress underneath.她穿着一件大衣,里面套着一条连衣裙。
17 guffawed 2e6c1d9bb61416c9a198a2e73eac2a39     
v.大笑,狂笑( guffaw的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • They all guffawed at his jokes. 他们听了他的笑话都一阵狂笑。
  • Hung-chien guffawed and said, "I deserve a scolding for that! 鸿渐哈哈大笑道:“我是该骂! 来自汉英文学 - 围城
18 abruptly iINyJ     
adv.突然地,出其不意地
参考例句:
  • He gestured abruptly for Virginia to get in the car.他粗鲁地示意弗吉尼亚上车。
  • I was abruptly notified that a half-hour speech was expected of me.我突然被通知要讲半个小时的话。
19 curiously 3v0zIc     
adv.有求知欲地;好问地;奇特地
参考例句:
  • He looked curiously at the people.他好奇地看着那些人。
  • He took long stealthy strides. His hands were curiously cold.他迈着悄没声息的大步。他的双手出奇地冷。
20 obstinate m0dy6     
adj.顽固的,倔强的,不易屈服的,较难治愈的
参考例句:
  • She's too obstinate to let anyone help her.她太倔强了,不会让任何人帮她的。
  • The trader was obstinate in the negotiation.这个商人在谈判中拗强固执。


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