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Chapter 26
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Next day we moved Strickland. It needed a good deal of firmness and still more patience to induce him to come, but he was really too ill to offer any effective resistance to Stroeve's entreaties1 and to my determination. We dressed him, while he feebly cursed us, got him downstairs, into a cab, and eventually to Stroeve's studio. He was so exhausted2 by the time we arrived that he allowed us to put him to bed without a word. He was ill for six weeks. At one time it looked as though he could not live more than a few hours, and I am convinced that it was only through the Dutchman's doggedness that he pulled through. I have never known a more difficult patient. It was not that he was exacting3 and querulous; on the contrary, he never complained, he asked for nothing, he was perfectly4 silent; but he seemed to resent the care that was taken of him; he received all inquiries5 about his feelings or his needs with a jibe6, a sneer7, or an oath. I found him detestable, and as soon as he was out of danger I had no hesitation8 in telling him so.

"Go to hell, " he answered briefly9.

Dirk Stroeve, giving up his work entirely10, nursed Strickland with tenderness and sympathy. He was dexterous11 to make him comfortable, and he exercised a cunning of which I should never have thought him capable to induce him to take the medicines prescribed by the doctor. Nothing was too much trouble for him. Though his means were adequate to the needs of himself and his wife, he certainly had no money to waste; but now he was wantonly extravagant12 in the purchase of delicacies13, out of season and dear, which might tempt14 Strickland's capricious appetite. I shall never forget the tactful patience with which he persuaded him to take nourishment15. He was never put out by Strickland's rudeness; if it was merely sullen16, he appeared not to notice it; if it was aggressive, he only chuckled17. When Strickland, recovering somewhat, was in a good humour and amused himself by laughing at him, he deliberately18 did absurd things to excite his ridicule19. Then he would give me little happy glances, so that I might notice in how much better form the patient was. Stroeve was sublime20.

But it was Blanche who most surprised me. She proved herself not only a capable, but a devoted21 nurse. There was nothing in her to remind you that she had so vehemently22 struggled against her husband's wish to bring Strickland to the studio. She insisted on doing her share of the offices needful to the sick. She arranged his bed so that it was possible to change the sheet without disturbing him. She washed him. When I remarked on her competence23, she told me with that pleasant little smile of hers that for a while she had worked in a hospital. She gave no sign that she hated Strickland so desperately24. She did not speak to him much, but she was quick to forestall25 his wants. For a fortnight it was necessary that someone should stay with him all night, and she took turns at watching with her husband. I wondered what she thought during the long darkness as she sat by the bedside. Strickland was a weird26 figure as he lay there, thinner than ever, with his ragged27 red beard and his eyes staring feverishly28 into vacancy29; his illness seemed to have made them larger, and they had an unnatural30 brightness.

"Does he ever talk to you in the night?" I asked her once.

"Never. "

"Do you dislike him as much as you did?"

"More, if anything. "

She looked at me with her calm gray eyes. Her expression was so placid31, it was hard to believe that she was capable of the violent emotion I had witnessed.

"Has he ever thanked you for what you do for him?"

"No, " she smiled.

"He's inhuman32. "

"He's abominable33. "

Stroeve was, of course, delighted with her. He could not do enough to show his gratitude34 for the whole-hearted devotion with which she had accepted the burden he laid on her. But he was a little puzzled by the behaviour of Blanche and Strickland towards one another.

"Do you know, I've seen them sit there for hours together without saying a word?"

On one occasion, when Strickland was so much better that in a day or two he was to get up, I sat with them in the studio. Dirk and I were talking. Mrs. Stroeve sewed, and I thought I recognised the shirt she was mending as Strickland's. He lay on his back; he did not speak. Once I saw that his eyes were fixed35 on Blanche Stroeve, and there was in them a curious irony36. Feeling their gaze, she raised her own, and for a moment they stared at one another. I could not quite understand her expression. Her eyes had in them a strange perplexity, and perhaps -- but why? -- alarm. In a moment Strickland looked away and idly surveyed the ceiling, but she continued to stare at him, and now her look was quite inexplicable37.

In a few days Strickland began to get up. He was nothing but skin and bone. His clothes hung upon him like rags on a scarecrow. With his untidy beard and long hair, his features, always a little larger than life, now emphasised by illness, he had an extraordinary aspect; but it was so odd that it was not quite ugly. There was something monumental in his ungainliness. I do not know how to express precisely38 the impression he made upon me. It was not exactly spirituality that was obvious, though the screen of the flesh seemed almost transparent39, because there was in his face an outrageous40 sensuality; but, though it sounds nonsense, it seemed as though his sensuality were curiously41 spiritual. There was in him something primitive42. He seemed to partake of those obscure forces of nature which the Greeks personified in shapes part human and part beast, the satyr and the faun. I thought of Marsyas, whom the god flayed43 because he had dared to rival him in song. Strickland seemed to bear in his heart strange harmonies and unadventured patterns, and I foresaw for him an end of torture and despair. I had again the feeling that he was possessed44 of a devil; but you could not say that it was a devil of evil, for it was a primitive force that existed before good and ill.

He was still too weak to paint, and he sat in the studio, silent, occupied with God knows what dreams, or reading. The books he liked were queer; sometimes I would find him poring over the poems of Mallarme, and he read them as a child reads, forming the words with his lips, and I wondered what strange emotion he got from those subtle cadences45 and obscure phrases; and again I found him absorbed in the detective novels of Gaboriau. I amused myself by thinking that in his choice of books he showed pleasantly the irreconcilable46 sides of his fantastic nature. It was singular to notice that even in the weak state of his body he had no thought for its comfort. Stroeve liked his ease, and in his studio were a couple of heavily upholstered arm-chairs and a large divan47. Strickland would not go near them, not from any affectation of stoicism, for I found him seated on a three-legged stool when I went into the studio one day and he was alone, but because he did not like them. For choice he sat on a kitchen chair without arms. It often exasperated48 me to see him. I never knew a man so entirely indifferent to his surroundings.

 

第二天我们就去给思特里克兰德搬家。劝说他搬到施特略夫家里来需要绝大的毅力和更多的耐心,幸而思特里克兰德病得实在太重,对于施特略夫的央求和我的决心都做不出有效的抵抗了。在他的软弱无力的咒骂声中,我们给他穿好衣服,扶着他走下楼梯,安置在一辆马车里,最后终于把他弄到施特略夫的画室里。当我们到达以后,他已经一点气力也没有了,只好一言不发地由我们把他放在一张床上。他的病延续了六个星期。有一段日子看上去他连几个钟头也活不过去了,我毫不怀疑,他之所以能够活下来完全要归功这位荷兰画家任劳任怨的护理。我从来也没有见到过比他更难伺候的病人。倒不是说他挑剔、抱怨;恰恰相反,他从来也不诉苦,从来不提出什么要求,他躺在那里一语不发。但是他似乎非常厌恨你对他的照顾;谁要是问一问他觉得怎么样、有什么需要,他轻则挖苦你一句,重则破口大骂。我发现这个人实在让人厌恶,他刚一脱离危险,我就把我的想法告诉了他。

“见鬼去吧,你,”他一点不客气地回敬了我一句。

戴尔克·施特略夫把自己的工作全部撂下,整天服侍病人,又体贴,又关切。他的手脚非常利索,把病人弄得舒舒服服。大夫开了药,他总是连哄带骗地劝病人按时服用,我从来没想到他的手段这么巧妙。无论做什么事他都不嫌麻烦。尽管他的收入一向只够维持夫妻两人的生活,从来就不宽裕,现在他却大手大脚,购买时令已过、价钱昂贵的美味,想方设法叫思特里克兰德多吃一点东西(他的胃口时好时坏,叫人无法捉摸)。我什么时候也忘不了他劝说思特里克兰德增加营养的那种耐心和手腕。不论思特里克兰德对他多么没礼貌,他也从来不动火。如果对方只是郁闷懊丧,他就假装看不到;如果对方顶撞他,他只是一笑置之。当思特里克兰德身体好了一些,情绪高起来,嘲笑他几句开开心,他就做出一些滑稽的举动来,故意给对方更多讥笑的机会。他会高兴地递给我几个眼色,叫我知道病人已经大有起色了。施特略夫实在是个大好人。

但是更使我感到吃惊的还是勃朗什。她证明了自己不仅是一个能干的、而且是一个专心致志的护士。你再也不会想到她曾一度激烈地反对过自己的丈夫,坚决不同意把思特里克兰德带回到家里来。病人需要照料的地方很多,她坚持要尽到自己一部分责任。她整理病人的床铺,尽量做到在撤换床单时不惊扰病人。她给病人洗浴。当我称赞她的能干时,她脸上露出惯有的微笑,告诉我她曾经在一家医院做过一段事。她丝毫不让人看出来,她曾经那样讨厌过思特里克兰德。她同他说话不多,但是不管他有什么需要,她都很快地就能知道。有两个星期思特里克兰德整夜都需要有人看护,她就和她丈夫轮班守夜。我真想知道,在她坐在病床旁边度过漫漫长夜时心里在想些什么。思特里克兰德躺在床上,样子古怪怕人,他的身躯比平常更加削瘦,红色的胡子乱成一团,眼睛兴奋地凝视着半空;因为生病,他的眼睛显得非常大,炯炯发光,但那光亮显得很不自然。

“夜里他跟你说过话吗?”有一次我问她。

“从来没有。”

“你还象过去那样不喜欢他吗?”

“比以前更厉害了。”

她用一双安详的、灰色的眼睛望着我。她的神色非常恬静,我很难相信她居然能象那次我看到的那样大发脾气。

“你替他做了这么多事,他谢过你吗?”

“没有。”她笑了笑说。

“这人真不通人情。”

“简直太可恶了。”

施特略夫对她自然非常满意。她这样把他撂给她的挑子担了过来,而且全心全意地履行自己的职责,他无论怎样做也无法表示对她的感激。但是他对勃朗什同思特里克兰德彼此的关系又有些不解。

“你知道,我看见过他们在一起坐了好几个钟头,谁也一句话不说。”

有一次我和这一家人一同坐在画室里,这时思特里克兰德的身体已经快好了,再过一两天就要起床了。戴尔克同我闲聊。施特略夫太太在缝补什么;她缝的东西我是认得的,那是思特里克兰德的一件衬衣。思特里克兰德仰面躺着,一句话也不说。有一次我看到他的目光停在勃朗什·施特略夫身上,带着一种奇怪的嘲弄神情。勃朗什感到他正在看自己,抬起眼睛,他们俩彼此凝视了一会儿。我不知道为什么她脸上会有这样的表情。她的目光里有一种奇怪的困惑,也许是——但为什么啊? ——惊惧的神色。思特里克兰德马上把眼睛移开了,开始悠闲地打量起天花板来;但是她却一直注视着他,脸上的神情更加不可解释了。

几天以后,思特里克兰德就下地了。他瘦得只剩下皮包骨头,衣服穿在身上就象稻草人披着一件破褂子似的。他的胡须凌乱,头发很长,鼻子眼睛本来就生得比一般人大,因为害过这场病,更显得大了一号;他的整个外表非常奇特,因为太古怪了,反而不显得那么丑陋。他的笨拙的形体给人以高大森严之感。我真不知道该如何确切地表达他给我的印象。最触目的一点倒不一定是他的裸露无遗的精神世界(虽然屏蔽着他精神的肉体几乎象是透明的),而是他脸上的那种蛮野的欲念。说来也许荒谬,这种肉欲又好象是空灵的,使你感到非常奇异。他身上散发着一种原始性;希腊人曾用半人半兽的形象,象生着马尾的森林之神啊,长着羊角、羊腿的农牧神啊,来表现大自然的这种神秘的力量,思特里克兰德身上就有这样一种力量。他使我想到马尔塞亚斯①,因为他居然敢同大神比赛音乐,所以被活剥了皮。思特里克兰德的心里好象怀着奇妙的和弦同未经探索过的画面。我预见到他的结局将是遭受痛苦的折磨和绝望。我心里又产生了一种他被魔鬼附体的感觉;但你却不能说这是邪恶的魔鬼,因为这是在宇宙混沌、善恶未分之前就存在的一种原始的力量。

①马尔塞亚斯是古代小亚细亚弗里吉亚国的一个吹笛人,同阿波罗比赛吹笛失败,被大神杀死。

他身体仍然很弱,不能作画。他沉默不语地坐在画室里,天晓得脑子里在想什么。有时候他也看书。他喜欢看的书都很怪;有时候我发现他在阅读马拉美②的诗。他读书的样子就象小孩子一样,动着嘴唇一个字一个字地拼读。我很想知道那些精巧的韵律和晦涩的诗句给他一些什么奇怪的感情。另外一些时候我发现他浸沉在嘉包里奥③的侦探小说里。我想,他对书的选择表现出组成他怪诞性格的不可调和的方面;我对自己的这个想法感到很有趣。尽管他的身体很弱,但是仍象往常一样,从不讲求舒适,这真是他奇怪的个性。施特略夫喜欢把起居环境弄得舒服一些,画室里摆着一对非常柔软的扶手椅和一张长沙发椅。思特里克兰德从来不坐这些椅子;他并不是矫揉造作,故意表示甘于艰苦,而是因为不喜欢它们。有一次我来看他,画室里只有他一个人,我发现他正坐在一只三脚凳上。如果叫他选择的话,他会喜欢不带扶手的硬背椅。他的这种习性常常叫我很恼火。我从来没有见过哪个人这么不关心周围的生活环境的。

②斯台凡·马拉美(1842—1898),法国象征派诗人。

③艾米尔·嘉包里奥(1835—1873),法国最早的侦探小说家。


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 entreaties d56c170cf2a22c1ecef1ae585b702562     
n.恳求,乞求( entreaty的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  • He began with entreaties and ended with a threat. 他先是恳求,最后是威胁。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The tyrant was deaf to the entreaties of the slaves. 暴君听不到奴隶们的哀鸣。 来自《简明英汉词典》
2 exhausted 7taz4r     
adj.极其疲惫的,精疲力尽的
参考例句:
  • It was a long haul home and we arrived exhausted.搬运回家的这段路程特别长,到家时我们已筋疲力尽。
  • Jenny was exhausted by the hustle of city life.珍妮被城市生活的忙乱弄得筋疲力尽。
3 exacting VtKz7e     
adj.苛求的,要求严格的
参考例句:
  • He must remember the letters and symbols with exacting precision.他必须以严格的精度记住每个字母和符号。
  • The public has been more exacting in its demands as time has passed.随着时间的推移,公众的要求更趋严格。
4 perfectly 8Mzxb     
adv.完美地,无可非议地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The witnesses were each perfectly certain of what they said.证人们个个对自己所说的话十分肯定。
  • Everything that we're doing is all perfectly above board.我们做的每件事情都是光明正大的。
5 inquiries 86a54c7f2b27c02acf9fcb16a31c4b57     
n.调查( inquiry的名词复数 );疑问;探究;打听
参考例句:
  • He was released on bail pending further inquiries. 他获得保释,等候进一步调查。
  • I have failed to reach them by postal inquiries. 我未能通过邮政查询与他们取得联系。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
6 jibe raBz0     
v.嘲笑,与...一致,使转向;n.嘲笑,嘲弄
参考例句:
  • Perhaps I should withdraw my jibe about hot air.或许我应当收回对热火朝天的嘲笑。
  • What he says does not jibe with what others say.他所说的与其他人说的不一致。
7 sneer YFdzu     
v.轻蔑;嘲笑;n.嘲笑,讥讽的言语
参考例句:
  • He said with a sneer.他的话中带有嘲笑之意。
  • You may sneer,but a lot of people like this kind of music.你可以嗤之以鼻,但很多人喜欢这种音乐。
8 hesitation tdsz5     
n.犹豫,踌躇
参考例句:
  • After a long hesitation, he told the truth at last.踌躇了半天,他终于直说了。
  • There was a certain hesitation in her manner.她的态度有些犹豫不决。
9 briefly 9Styo     
adv.简单地,简短地
参考例句:
  • I want to touch briefly on another aspect of the problem.我想简单地谈一下这个问题的另一方面。
  • He was kidnapped and briefly detained by a terrorist group.他被一个恐怖组织绑架并短暂拘禁。
10 entirely entirely     
ad.全部地,完整地;完全地,彻底地
参考例句:
  • The fire was entirely caused by their neglect of duty. 那场火灾完全是由于他们失职而引起的。
  • His life was entirely given up to the educational work. 他的一生统统献给了教育工作。
11 dexterous Ulpzs     
adj.灵敏的;灵巧的
参考例句:
  • As people grow older they generally become less dexterous.随着年龄的增长,人通常会变得不再那么手巧。
  • The manager was dexterous in handling his staff.那位经理善于运用他属下的职员。
12 extravagant M7zya     
adj.奢侈的;过分的;(言行等)放肆的
参考例句:
  • They tried to please him with fulsome compliments and extravagant gifts.他们想用溢美之词和奢华的礼品来取悦他。
  • He is extravagant in behaviour.他行为放肆。
13 delicacies 0a6e87ce402f44558508deee2deb0287     
n.棘手( delicacy的名词复数 );精致;精美的食物;周到
参考例句:
  • Its flesh has exceptional delicacies. 它的肉异常鲜美。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  • After these delicacies, the trappers were ready for their feast. 在享用了这些美食之后,狩猎者开始其大餐。 来自英汉非文学 - 民俗
14 tempt MpIwg     
vt.引诱,勾引,吸引,引起…的兴趣
参考例句:
  • Nothing could tempt him to such a course of action.什么都不能诱使他去那样做。
  • The fact that she had become wealthy did not tempt her to alter her frugal way of life.她有钱了,可这丝毫没能让她改变节俭的生活习惯。
15 nourishment Ovvyi     
n.食物,营养品;营养情况
参考例句:
  • Lack of proper nourishment reduces their power to resist disease.营养不良降低了他们抵抗疾病的能力。
  • He ventured that plants draw part of their nourishment from the air.他大胆提出植物从空气中吸收部分养分的观点。
16 sullen kHGzl     
adj.愠怒的,闷闷不乐的,(天气等)阴沉的
参考例句:
  • He looked up at the sullen sky.他抬头看了一眼阴沉的天空。
  • Susan was sullen in the morning because she hadn't slept well.苏珊今天早上郁闷不乐,因为昨晚没睡好。
17 chuckled 8ce1383c838073977a08258a1f3e30f8     
轻声地笑( chuckle的过去式和过去分词 )
参考例句:
  • She chuckled at the memory. 想起这件事她就暗自发笑。
  • She chuckled softly to herself as she remembered his astonished look. 想起他那惊讶的表情,她就轻轻地暗自发笑。
18 deliberately Gulzvq     
adv.审慎地;蓄意地;故意地
参考例句:
  • The girl gave the show away deliberately.女孩故意泄露秘密。
  • They deliberately shifted off the argument.他们故意回避这个论点。
19 ridicule fCwzv     
v.讥讽,挖苦;n.嘲弄
参考例句:
  • You mustn't ridicule unfortunate people.你不该嘲笑不幸的人。
  • Silly mistakes and queer clothes often arouse ridicule.荒谬的错误和古怪的服装常会引起人们的讪笑。
20 sublime xhVyW     
adj.崇高的,伟大的;极度的,不顾后果的
参考例句:
  • We should take some time to enjoy the sublime beauty of nature.我们应该花些时间去欣赏大自然的壮丽景象。
  • Olympic games play as an important arena to exhibit the sublime idea.奥运会,就是展示此崇高理念的重要舞台。
21 devoted xu9zka     
adj.忠诚的,忠实的,热心的,献身于...的
参考例句:
  • He devoted his life to the educational cause of the motherland.他为祖国的教育事业贡献了一生。
  • We devoted a lengthy and full discussion to this topic.我们对这个题目进行了长时间的充分讨论。
22 vehemently vehemently     
adv. 热烈地
参考例句:
  • He argued with his wife so vehemently that he talked himself hoarse. 他和妻子争论得很激烈,以致讲话的声音都嘶哑了。
  • Both women vehemently deny the charges against them. 两名妇女都激烈地否认了对她们的指控。
23 competence NXGzV     
n.能力,胜任,称职
参考例句:
  • This mess is a poor reflection on his competence.这种混乱情况说明他难当此任。
  • These are matters within the competence of the court.这些是法院权限以内的事。
24 desperately cu7znp     
adv.极度渴望地,绝望地,孤注一掷地
参考例句:
  • He was desperately seeking a way to see her again.他正拼命想办法再见她一面。
  • He longed desperately to be back at home.他非常渴望回家。
25 forestall X6Qyv     
vt.抢在…之前采取行动;预先阻止
参考例句:
  • I left the room to forestall involvements.我抢先离开了这房间以免受牵累。
  • He followed this rule in order to forestall rumors.他遵守这条规矩是为了杜绝流言蜚语。
26 weird bghw8     
adj.古怪的,离奇的;怪诞的,神秘而可怕的
参考例句:
  • From his weird behaviour,he seems a bit of an oddity.从他不寻常的行为看来,他好像有点怪。
  • His weird clothes really gas me.他的怪衣裳简直笑死人。
27 ragged KC0y8     
adj.衣衫褴褛的,粗糙的,刺耳的
参考例句:
  • A ragged shout went up from the small crowd.这一小群人发出了刺耳的喊叫。
  • Ragged clothing infers poverty.破衣烂衫意味着贫穷。
28 feverishly 5ac95dc6539beaf41c678cd0fa6f89c7     
adv. 兴奋地
参考例句:
  • Feverishly he collected his data. 他拼命收集资料。
  • The company is having to cast around feverishly for ways to cut its costs. 公司迫切须要想出各种降低成本的办法。
29 vacancy EHpy7     
n.(旅馆的)空位,空房,(职务的)空缺
参考例句:
  • Her going on maternity leave will create a temporary vacancy.她休产假时将会有一个临时空缺。
  • The vacancy of her expression made me doubt if she was listening.她茫然的神情让我怀疑她是否在听。
30 unnatural 5f2zAc     
adj.不自然的;反常的
参考例句:
  • Did her behaviour seem unnatural in any way?她有任何反常表现吗?
  • She has an unnatural smile on her face.她脸上挂着做作的微笑。
31 placid 7A1yV     
adj.安静的,平和的
参考例句:
  • He had been leading a placid life for the past eight years.八年来他一直过着平静的生活。
  • You should be in a placid mood and have a heart-to- heart talk with her.你应该心平气和的好好和她谈谈心。
32 inhuman F7NxW     
adj.残忍的,不人道的,无人性的
参考例句:
  • We must unite the workers in fighting against inhuman conditions.我们必须使工人们团结起来反对那些难以忍受的工作条件。
  • It was inhuman to refuse him permission to see his wife.不容许他去看自己的妻子是太不近人情了。
33 abominable PN5zs     
adj.可厌的,令人憎恶的
参考例句:
  • Their cruel treatment of prisoners was abominable.他们虐待犯人的做法令人厌恶。
  • The sanitary conditions in this restaurant are abominable.这家饭馆的卫生状况糟透了。
34 gratitude p6wyS     
adj.感激,感谢
参考例句:
  • I have expressed the depth of my gratitude to him.我向他表示了深切的谢意。
  • She could not help her tears of gratitude rolling down her face.她感激的泪珠禁不住沿着面颊流了下来。
35 fixed JsKzzj     
adj.固定的,不变的,准备好的;(计算机)固定的
参考例句:
  • Have you two fixed on a date for the wedding yet?你们俩选定婚期了吗?
  • Once the aim is fixed,we should not change it arbitrarily.目标一旦确定,我们就不应该随意改变。
36 irony P4WyZ     
n.反语,冷嘲;具有讽刺意味的事,嘲弄
参考例句:
  • She said to him with slight irony.她略带嘲讽地对他说。
  • In her voice we could sense a certain tinge of irony.从她的声音里我们可以感到某种讥讽的意味。
37 inexplicable tbCzf     
adj.无法解释的,难理解的
参考例句:
  • It is now inexplicable how that development was misinterpreted.当时对这一事态发展的错误理解究竟是怎么产生的,现在已经无法说清楚了。
  • There are many things which are inexplicable by science.有很多事科学还无法解释。
38 precisely zlWzUb     
adv.恰好,正好,精确地,细致地
参考例句:
  • It's precisely that sort of slick sales-talk that I mistrust.我不相信的正是那种油腔滑调的推销宣传。
  • The man adjusted very precisely.那个人调得很准。
39 transparent Smhwx     
adj.明显的,无疑的;透明的
参考例句:
  • The water is so transparent that we can see the fishes swimming.水清澈透明,可以看到鱼儿游来游去。
  • The window glass is transparent.窗玻璃是透明的。
40 outrageous MvFyH     
adj.无理的,令人不能容忍的
参考例句:
  • Her outrageous behaviour at the party offended everyone.她在聚会上的无礼行为触怒了每一个人。
  • Charges for local telephone calls are particularly outrageous.本地电话资费贵得出奇。
41 curiously 3v0zIc     
adv.有求知欲地;好问地;奇特地
参考例句:
  • He looked curiously at the people.他好奇地看着那些人。
  • He took long stealthy strides. His hands were curiously cold.他迈着悄没声息的大步。他的双手出奇地冷。
42 primitive vSwz0     
adj.原始的;简单的;n.原(始)人,原始事物
参考例句:
  • It is a primitive instinct to flee a place of danger.逃离危险的地方是一种原始本能。
  • His book describes the march of the civilization of a primitive society.他的著作描述了一个原始社会的开化过程。
43 flayed 477fd38febec6da69d637f7ec30ab03a     
v.痛打( flay的过去式和过去分词 );把…打得皮开肉绽;剥(通常指动物)的皮;严厉批评
参考例句:
  • He was so angry he nearly flayed his horse alive. 他气得几乎把马活活抽死。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  • The teacher flayed the idle students. 老师严责那些懒惰的学生。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
44 possessed xuyyQ     
adj.疯狂的;拥有的,占有的
参考例句:
  • He flew out of the room like a man possessed.他像着了魔似地猛然冲出房门。
  • He behaved like someone possessed.他行为举止像是魔怔了。
45 cadences 223bef8d3b558abb3ff19570aacb4a63     
n.(声音的)抑扬顿挫( cadence的名词复数 );节奏;韵律;调子
参考例句:
  • He delivered his words in slow, measured cadences. 他讲话缓慢而抑扬顿挫、把握有度。
  • He recognized the Polish cadences in her voice. 他从她的口音中听出了波兰腔。 来自辞典例句
46 irreconcilable 34RxO     
adj.(指人)难和解的,势不两立的
参考例句:
  • These practices are irreconcilable with the law of the Church.这种做法与教规是相悖的。
  • These old concepts are irreconcilable with modern life.这些陈旧的观念与现代生活格格不入。
47 divan L8Byv     
n.长沙发;(波斯或其他东方诗人的)诗集
参考例句:
  • Lord Henry stretched himself out on the divan and laughed.亨利勋爵伸手摊脚地躺在沙发椅上,笑着。
  • She noticed that Muffat was sitting resignedly on a narrow divan-bed.她看见莫法正垂头丧气地坐在一张不宽的坐床上。
48 exasperated ltAz6H     
adj.恼怒的
参考例句:
  • We were exasperated at his ill behaviour. 我们对他的恶劣行为感到非常恼怒。
  • Constant interruption of his work exasperated him. 对他工作不断的干扰使他恼怒。


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